Tag Archives: Workers

Higher Work Comp Claims Costs for Older Workers

Before this site goes dark, here is a post I could not ignore from my friend, Maria Todd.

Those of you in work comp who sneered at my idea because I did not have any “credibility”, I dare you to challenge Maria. She has more experience in these matters than many of you put together, and a PhD to boot.

And if you find my comments disturbing, too bad! I’ve had to put up with your lousy treatment of me for four years.

Here’s the link:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/aon-workers-compensation-claim-costs-increase-mature-k-todd-mha-phd?trk=hb_ntf_MEGAPHONE_ARTICLE_POST

 

Deaf, Dumb and Blind, part Deux

Back in June, I wrote a post with the above mentioned title. Then, I was on a rant, now I am just reporting what my fellow blogger, Joe Paduda has written about today regarding a report from the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) on the various state workers’ compensation systems.

This report harks back to one conducted in 1972 on the state of workers’ compensation then, but as Joe points out today, seeking a return to that Commission report and to that decades-old recommendations is absurd.

Rather than give you my take on this meeting from yesterday, here is Joe’s article. I always give credit where it is due, and he is due a lot of credit for his reporting.

It would seem that not only is the workers’ comp industry deaf, dumb and blind, but so is the federal government, if we are to take Joe at his word.

And in the meantime, who gets hurt while these eggheads, bureaucrats, nincompoops and sticks-in-the-muds do more study, research, look back forty years and pine for an economy and workforce that no longer exists? The injured workers.

And who, in the meantime, while the insurers, employers, and various stakeholders gouge and game the system, gets hurt, disabled or even dies? The injured workers.

It seems to me that the only thing that matters to the eggheads, bureaucrats, nincompoops, sticks-in-the-muds, insurers, employers, and various stakeholders is, how to screw the worker, save money by not paying adequate wages and benefits, make more profits off of someone’s disability, and not the care and treatment of the one who is disabled and forced into poverty.

Here is the perfect example of the state of affairs in workers’ comp, both inside and outside the industry:

hear-no-evil-see-no-evil-speak-no-evil

 

GoFundMe??? Really!!!

Here is a case of an injured worker who was denied work comp when he fell down some stairs at work, and now had to have his wife start a GoFundMe account.

A former co-worker of mine when I worked for a large insurance broker also fell going down stairs in the building we worked in, and he did not have this problem.

THIS IS UNCONSCIONABLE. THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT COMP IS FOR. FAMILIES SHOULD NOT HAVE TO GO BROKE IF SOMEONE SLIPS AND FALLS DOWN A FLIGHT OF STAIRS ON THE WORK PREMISES.

This is the result of too many cooks and too many lawyers mucking up the system, which forces the carriers or the employers to deny or seek the denial of benefits.

If any of you feel charitable, here is the link to the GoFundMe page:

https://www.gofundme.com/2n5y8apc

Now you know why I call my blog “Transforming Workers’ Comp”. This has to stop.

Cut the C**P!

For my 300th article, I want to address the medical travel industry and its failure to rid itself of the crooks, liars, shysters, and phonies who prey upon the desperate.

Case in point, the article last Wednesday in the New York Times by Gail Kolata about one man’s experience getting stem cell therapy through medical travel.

This case is endemic of the industry’s impotence to police itself and get rid of those medical providers and hucksters who use slick promotional material to sell useless and often dangerous treatments or dubious procedures.

But what do you expect from an industry whose major organization is merely a conduit for funneling money into the pockets of the organization’s founders and their friends?

What do you expect from an industry that emphasizes attending conferences and not on standardizing the laws and processes for the provision of medical care across national borders.

When I started this blog over three years ago, I had high hopes that the industry would listen to what I had to say, and to at least consider offering medical travel to injured workers in the US. But as happened with the workers’ comp industry, no one has stepped up and offered to work with me.

I’m not mad at everyone in the industry. Many of you are very nice people and work very hard, but your focus is on such medical care as dentistry, cancer, cosmetic/plastic surgery, and other treatments not available in the US, or too expensive.

But helping those who are injured on the job, and many of whom are from many of the countries in this hemisphere who offer medical travel services, should be something some of you might want to do.

It was my hope that this industry would offer me a chance to change direction, but that has not happened, and now I am not sure if it ever will.  There does not seem to be any financial or employment opportunities here, just a lot of conferences and hyperbole.

Prove me wrong.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Comp Blog is now viewed all over the world in over 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

“Florida, We Have a Problem”

Tuesday, Judge David Langham, Deputy Chief Judge of Compensation Claims for the Florida Office of Judges of Compensation Claims and Division of Administrative Hearings, wrote a rather lengthy post about the differences between cost-shifting and case-shifting in workers’ comp.

Much of what the Judge wrote were subjects that I already discussed in a number of previous posts about cost-shifting and case-shifting, so I won’t go into it here. I am only focusing on the parts that relate to Florida workers’ comp. You can read the entire article yourselves.

But what caught my attention was what he said about Florida and what the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) reported in some of their studies on these issues.

As Judge Langham wrote this week, he wrote a post two years ago that asked the question “Why Does Surgery Cost Double in Workers’ Compensation?”

Judge Langham noted in that post that Florida employers have been documented paying almost double for shoulder or knee surgery that is paid for under workers’ compensation, compared to group health costs.

The implication of case-shifting in Florida, he says, could arguably be a doubling of cost.

He cited a WCRI report released earlier this year that suggests however that case-shifting is perhaps not as likely in Florida.

According to the report, Judge Langham continues, “as of July 2011, six states had workers’ comp medical fee schedules with rates within 15% of Medicare rates. They were California, Massachusetts, Florida, North Carolina, New York and Hawaii.”

However, Judge Langham pointed out that the WCRI concluded that case-shifting is more likely in states where the workers’ compensation fee schedule is 20% or more above the group health rates, and not in Florida.

Judge Langham stated that this analysis of workers’ compensation fee schedules does not appear to include analysis of the reimbursement rates for hospitals, and that It also seems contradictory to the assertions that Florida workers’ compensation costs for various surgeries have been documented as roughly double the group health rates (100% higher, not 15% higher).

Injured workers who missed work in the Florida workers’ compensation system could be compensated in 2016 at a rate as high as $862.51 per week, the “maximum compensation rate.”

So, if recovery from such a “soft-tissue” injury required ten weeks off-work, he wrote, the case-shifting to workers’ compensation might add another four to nine thousand dollars to the already doubled cost of surgical repair under workers’ compensation.

This could be directly borne by the employer if the employer is self-insured for workers’ compensation; or, if the employer has purchased workers’ compensation insurance, the effect on the employer would be indirect in the form of potentially increased premium costs for workers’ compensation following such events and payments, Judge Langham states.

According to WCRI, the Judge quotes, “policymakers have always focused on the impact (workers’ compensation) fee schedules have on access to care as well as utilization of services.

This has been a two-part analysis, he says:

First, fee schedules have to be sufficient such that physicians are willing to provide care in the workers’ compensation system; and second, the reimbursement cannot be too high, or perhaps overutilization is encouraged.

Lastly, Judge Langham points out that the disparity between costs has also been noted in discussions of “medical tourism.”

The last question he posits is this, “might medical decision makers direct care to more efficient providers, across town, across state lines?”

What about national borders?


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Blog is now viewed all over the world in 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Florida State Supreme Court Upholds Law’s Validity

Following up on what I reported on earlier this week, the Supreme Court of Florida unanimously decided not to review Daniel Stahl v. Hialeah Hospital, according to Business Insurance’s Stephanie Goldberg.

In my previous post, I mentioned that the 1st District Court of Appeal had ruled that attorney fee schedules violated state law.

But the Court of Appeal also ruled back in March in the above referenced case, that the workers comp system was an adequate exclusive remedy, Ms. Goldberg said in her article.

The State Supreme Court accepted jurisdiction to review the decision, and said in its ruling that, “after further consideration and hearing oral argument in this case, we have determined that we should exercise our discretion and discharge jurisdiction.”

So for the time being, it would seem that Florida’s Workers’ Compensation law is constitutional, and until other cases that are pending are resolved (see my articles, “Constitutionality of Workers’ Comp Challenged: What that could mean for Medical Travel“, “Update on Constitutionality of Work Comp in Florida“, and “Advocacy Group Petitions Florida Supreme Court to Review Work Comp Constitutionality“), Florida’s injured workers will still have something to protect them.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Blog is now viewed all over the world in 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Fee Schedules May Increase Number of Work Comp Claims

The Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) published a new study that examined whether fee schedules increase the number of workers’ compensation claims.

In previous reports, the WCRI found that in many states, workers’ compensation pays higher prices than group health.

Another study they issued, found that in some states, workers’ compensation prices were two to four times higher than group health prices.

Moreover, in most states, WCRI found, the workers’ compensation systems rely heavily on the treating physician to determine whether a specific patient’s injury is work-related or not.

Dr. Olesya Fomenko, the author of the report and an economist at WCRI, said that, “Policymakers have always focused on the impact fee schedules have on access to care as well as utilization of services. This study shines a light on an issue that policymakers and other system stakeholders might not be thinking of, which is that physicians may call an injury work-related in order to receive a higher reimbursement for care he or she provides to the patient.”

Two of the findings from the study are as follows:

  • If the cause of injury is not straightforward (e.g., soft tissue conditions), case-shifting is more common in the states with higher workers’ compensation reimbursement rates. In particular, the study estimated that a 20 percent growth in workers’ compensation payments for physician services provided during an office visit increases the number of soft tissue injuries being called work-related by 6 percent.
  • There was no evidence of case-shifting from group health to workers’ compensation for patients with conditions for which causation is more certain (e.g., fractures, lacerations, and contusions).

What does this mean?

It means that physicians seeking higher reimbursements are classifying some injuries as work-related, and that there is no evidence of case-shifting from group health where the cause is more determinable.

What it also means is that no matter what the industry tries to do to lower medical costs, there is always a way for physicians and other stakeholders to do the opposite for their own benefit.

And given that, you have to wonder why the industry is deaf, dumb and blind to alternatives that apply basic economic laws to saving money. If you can get a good or service at the same or better quality, and at lower cost, no matter where that is, you go there.

It works that way when buying cars in one state, when the buyer lives in another state, and it should work that way with medical care, particularly regarding surgery.

The industry should not listen to certain individuals who dismiss this idea, and call the locations where better or equal care can be obtained at lower cost, “Turkishmaninacanstans“.

It demeans the hard work and dedication of medical professionals and business people who have spent years and money on building a business to provide health care that is affordable and of the highest quality.

It insults the education and training of doctors, nurses, and medical technicians in those countries who otherwise might not be working in such a highly respect profession as medicine.

It only proves that the author of that canard is a coward, a racist, and dead wrong.