Tag Archives: Workers’ Compensation

The Further Adventures of Ashley Furniture in Medical Travel

Readers of this blog will remember two previous articles I linked to back in October 2017 and November 2017 about the Ashley Furniture Company’s foray into Medical Travel.

Now comes a new article, courtesy of Kaiser Health News, that shows just how American patients are saving money by having surgery in Cancun, Mexico for procedures such as knee surgery (are you listening, Workers’ Compsters?)

Not only are the patients traveling to Cancun, but so are the physicians from the US.  As pictured below, Donna Ferguson, the wife of one of Ashley’s employees, is shown in the hospital in Cancun, along with her doctors, one of whom will be performing knee replacement surgery. As stated in the article, all she had to do was walk out of her hotel, and into the Galenia Hospital through a short hallway.

Donna Ferguson, center, of Ecru, Miss., had no contact with Milwaukee surgeon Dr. Thomas Parisi, left, before meeting him in Cancun the day before he performed her knee replacement surgery. (Rocco Saint-Mleux for KHN)

Donna’s surgeon, Dr. Thomas Parisi, from Milwaukee, had flown to Cancun the day before. To get this surgery, which she was getting for free, she would also receive a check when she got home. (I’ve said this before, but you never listened)

According to the article, the employees of Ashley receive a $5,000 payment from the company, and all their travel costs are covered. They use this option because they have no out-of-pocket copayments or deductibles, so it made financial sense for both a highly trained orthopedist and a patient from Mississippi to leave the US and meet at an upscale Mexican hospital. (Let’s see Trump try to built a wall to stop that!)

Dr. Parisi spent less than 24 hours in Cancun, so no one could accuse him of slacking off to play golf, and was paid $2,700, which as the article stated, was three times what he would have gotten from Medicare. The cost of the surgery for Ashley was less than half of what it would have been in the US.

To understand better, just why Ashley is doing this for their employees and their families, let’s look at what the average knee replacement would cost in the US: about $30,000 — sometimes double or triple that; whereas in Mexico, at Galenia, it was only $12,000. according to Dr. Gabriela Flores Teón, the hospital’s medical director.

The standard charge for the night at Galenia is $300, compared to an average of $2,000 at US hospitals, said Dr. Flores.

But besides the big savings on the surgery, there was also savings on the cost of the medical device, made by a subsidiary of the Band-Aid people, J&J, in New Jersey. The implant cost $3,500 in Mexico, but nearly $8,000 in the US, Flores continued.

In case you WC hotshots were wondering, Galenia Hospital is not some fleabag hospital on the cheap. It is accredited by the international affiliation of the Joint Commission (JCI). They set the standards for hospitals in the US.

However, so that doctors and patients could feel comfortable with surgery, NASH (North American Speciality Hospital) based in Denver, and who has organized treatment for dozens of American patients at Galenia since 2017, along with Galenia, worked to go beyond those standards.

In the two SPOTLIGHT articles referenced above, the manager of global benefits and health at Ashley, Marcus Gagnon said, “We’ve had an overwhelming positive reaction from employees who have gone,”

The company has also sent about 140 employees or dependents for treatments at a hospital in Costa Rica, and together, the foreign medical facilities have saved Ashley $3.2 million in health care costs, said Gagnon. (Wake up, you WC guys! Why are you being so stubborn?)

Gagnon continued, “Even after the incentive payments and travel expenses, we still save about half the cost of paying for care in the United States,” “It’s been a nice option — not a magic bullet — but a nice option.”

So, if Ashley can do it, and if HSM could do it too, the so could you. Not all the hospitals outside of the US are fleabags. Galenia in Cancun is one example. Bumrungrad in Thailand is another, and there are plenty more around the world that cater to medical travel.

The whole point of my advocacy for medical travel and workers’ comp was so that American workers and their dependents like Donna could travel abroad and see what the world is really like, so that political, hate-filled rallies and incidents we are seeing everyday since the election of a white supremacist to the presidency, would not take place.

How else will the American worker learn about the real world beyond his borders if not this way? Certainly not from Fox News.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.”

― Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad / Roughing It

 

Cross-Border Health Care – Insurance Industry Finally Takes Notice

Readers of this blog have no doubt read my first post on cross-border health care, Cross-Border Health Care a Reality in California, among others. Many of them dealt with getting medical care under workers’ compensation, and the others were confined to the health care space.

Thanks to fellow blogger, Joe Paduda, who sent me a copy of the following Quick Take from the GB Journal, a publication of Gallagher Bassett, the issue of cross-border health care, especially in workers’ comp (my idea originally) is finally getting traction in the industry.

Not that I am blowing my horn, mind you, but it would have been nice to get some recognition a few years back when I started writing.

Well, anyway, here is the item from GB Journal:

Quick Take 2:
Cross Border Health Care

Employers in Arizona and California’s huge agriculture business figured this out a long time ago. For many employees who are either Mexican nationals or who have extensive family connections in northern Mexico, getting needed medical treatment in Mexico can be both more convenient and much more cost effective than treatment north of the border. Your humble correspondent set up group health PPO networks in Mexicali and Tijuana for seasonal farm workers back in the 80s. They worked remarkably well and provided this generally underserved group with excellent care at affordable rates. A recent article in Risk & Insurance’s online service describes how the same concept is now being used for treatment under workers’ compensation. 

Yes, this is legal under California law. (The R&I article does not mention Arizona comp law.) The author makes specific reference to the Mexican HMO Sistemas Medicos Nacionales, S.A. de C.V. (SIMNSA), which is – an important point – licensed by the State of California. In addition to lower costs and convenience, treating in Mexico can have additional advantages for injured workers who are not fluent in English and who feel more comfortable in a familiar cultural setting. Getting medical treatment in Mexico is not suitable for all claims or all employees, obviously, but if you have a significant comp exposure close to our southern border, you might want to check this out with your comp carrier or TPA, if you have not already.

If you want any additional information, or would like to explore this option for your workers’ comp needs, contact me and I will work with you to put together a plan for you.

Medical Travel/Health Care Thought Leader Seeks Opportunities

 

Medical Travel/HealthCare Thought Leader and Blogger, seeks opportunities to speak, write, and collaborate on projects to bring about greater participation of patients to global medical travel facilities.

NOTE: DUE TO SEVERE FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL DISTRESS, I AM SEEKING IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITIES IN MEDICAL TRAVEL. PLEASE RESPOND IF YOU CAN OFFER ASSISTANCE, AS THIS IS A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH.

BE ADVISED : I am not a physician, nor do I have patients or clients to refer to you. I am seeking persons already engaged in medical travel who want to expand into a new market. I offer my services in an administrative or managerial capacity.

Experience:

Over six years experience creating, maintaining, and analyzing current issues in Medical Travel, Health Care, and other topics.

Over six years research into the Medical Travel industry.

Promoted the implementation of medical travel into Workers’ Compensation insurance industry.

Analyzed the cost of healthcare and the options of alternative treatments abroad.

Presented White Paper to Medical Travel conference in Mexico in Nov. 2014.

Extensive experience in Insurance and Claims Management, especially in medical-related claims (Workers’ Compensation).

Strong administrative and financial skills.

Education:

Master’s in Health Administration, 2011

Interested in working remotely, willing to travel, willing to write and speak at conferences, has valid US passport.

Resume can be found here.

Blog: richardkrasner.wordpress.com

Phone number: +1 561-603-1685 (mobile)

 

Opt-Out: The Final Word?

For the first post of the new year, I want to return to a well-worn subject, thanks to Joe Paduda, who published his predictions for workers’ comp last week: Opt-Out in workers’ comp.

In part 2 of Joe’s predictions, he predicted that Opt-Out will not gain any traction, and that Opt-Out is a solution in search of a problem. By that, Joe means that workers’ comp is working well overall, and that costs are under control, employers don’t see it as an issue, and there is no political constituency that wants to make it happen.

Joe rightly points out that the problems facing work comp are tiny compared to other issues state legislatures are dealing with — such as taxes, school funding, gerrymandering, Medicaid expansion, rural hospital funding, industrial and economic development, natural disaster preparation and recovery.

However, Joe’s friend, Jennifer Wolf Horesjh, Executive Director of the IAIABC (International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions) believes that advocates are working diligently to promote Opt-Out/Non-subscription.

In my comment to Joe, I said the following: “The Koch Brothers and the companies behind ARAWC are free-market, libertarians who don’t want government social insurance programs like work comp. You are probably correct that it won’t happen, but that won’t stop them from trying.”

Whether Joe is right or wrong in his prediction, will have to wait until the end of this year. But since it is only a prediction, time will tell if Opt-Out moves forward. Thus the title of this piece has a question mark, because we don’t know what the final word is on the subject.

The Road to Recovery: Post-Acute Care in Workers Compensation

The following is directed towards all those engaged in medical travel and have been following my blog for some time. Sorry I haven’t been writing in a while. I either did not see anything to write about, or just wasn’t in the mood.

But the article below should be of extreme interest to all of you who deal with post-acute care and after care, even though you are not involved as of yet in workers’ comp.

As the original focus of the blog was transforming workers’ comp, this should be read by those of you who have followed my ideas on the subject. Let me know what you think.

NCCI, for those of you not familiar with them, is the organization responsible for collecting and distributing data about the American workers’ comp industry, what is driving the costs of comp, and of claims, and other financial data relevant to the industry’s function.

Here is the link to their article:

Source: The Road to Recovery: Post-Acute Care in Workers Compensation

At the Bottom: A Work Comp Perspective on the Need for Single Payer

It is rare when someone from the work comp blogosphere crosses into health care and advocates that the US learn from other countries that have universal health care, in whatever form it takes in those countries.

Tom Lynch of Lynch Ryan’s Workers’ Comp Insider blog, did just that with a very detailed analysis of the US health care system compared to that of other Organization for Economic and Cooperative Development (OECD) countries.

Here is Tom’s article:

What does a nation owe its citizens with respect to health care?

For nearly all members of the Organization for Economic and Cooperative Development (OECD), the answer is guaranteed, high-quality, universal care at reasonable, affordable cost. For OECD founding member America, the answer seems to have become an opportunity to access care, which may or may not be of high-quality at indeterminate, wildly fluctuating and geographically varying cost.

It is indisputable that the US devotes more of its GDP to health care than other countries. How much more? For that answer we can turn to many sources, roughly all saying the same thing. The OECD produces annual date, as does the World Health Organization, among others. Another reliable and respected source is The Commonwealth Fund, which conducted a study of eleven high income OECD members including the US. The collection of health care cost data lags, so data from this study is mostly from 2014. Here is the cost picture:

As you can see, in 1980, US spending was not much different from the other ten OECD countries in the study. While high, it was at least in the same universe. But now, at 50% more than Switzerland, our closest competitor in the “how much can we spend” sweepstakes”, we might be forgiven for asking, “What in the name of Hippocrates happened?” As if this weren’t enough, the 2014 GDP percentage of spend, 16.6%, has now risen to nearly 18%, according to the CMS.

So, what do we get for all that money? We ought to have the highest life expectancy, the lowest infant mortality rate and the best health care outcomes in the entire OECD. But we don’t.

For many readers, it is probably galling to see both the UK and Australia at the top of the health care system performance measure and at the bottom of the spending measure. In the early 2000s, each of these countries poured a significant amount of money into improving its performance, and the results speak for themselves.

Consider all of this mere background to the purpose of this blog post.

Last week, we wrote about the terrible, 40-year stagnation of real wage growth in the US, pointing out that in that period real wages in 1982-1984 constant dollars have risen only 4.5%. But, as we have seen, health care spending did not follow that trajectory. This has resulted in tremendous hardship for families as they have tried to keep pace with rising health care costs. For, just as US health care spending has risen dramatically since 1980, so has what families have to pay for it.

To put this in perspective, consider this. Since 1999 the US CPI has risen 54%, but, as the chart above shows, the cost of an employer offered family plan has risen 338%. If a family’s health care plan’s cost growth had been inflation-based, the total cost to employer and employee would be $8,898 in 2018, not $19,616. In 2018, the average family in an employer-based plan pays 30% of the plan’s cost ($6,850), plus a $2,000 deductible, plus co-pays that average $20 whenever health care is accessed, plus varying levels of co-pays for drugs.

On top of all that is the enormous difficulty people have in trying to navigate the dizzying health care system (if you can call it that). American health care is a dense forest of bewildering complexity, a many-headed Hydra that would make Hesiod proud, a labyrinthine geography in which even Theseus with his ball of string would find himself lost.

With wages and health care costs growing ever farther apart, America has a crisis of epic proportion. Yet all we can seem to do is shout at each other about it. When do you think that will end? When will we begin to answer the question that this post began with: What does a nation owe its citizens with respect to health care? When will our nation’s leaders realize we can actually learn from countries like Australia, the UK, Switzerland and all the other high performing, low cost members of the OECD? Continuing on the present course is no longer a viable option.

 

Note: You may be questioning The Commonwealth Fund’s research. To put your mind at ease about that, here are the study sources:

Our data come from a variety of sources. One is comparative survey research. Since 1998, The Commonwealth Fund, in collaboration with international partners, has supported surveys of patients and primary care physicians in advanced countries, collecting information for a standardized set of metrics on health system performance. Other comparative data are drawn from the most recent reports of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies, and the World Health Organization (WHO).

Link: http://workerscompinsider.com/2018/11/at-the-bottom-looking-up/

Six Years and Counting: Yet No Opportunities

Those of you who wished me congratulations the past few weeks were told that you were a little early, as yesterday, the 29th was my actual anniversary for beginning this blog.

To refresh your memory, I began this blog three days after returning from the 5th World Medical Tourism & Global Healthcare Congress in Hollywood, Florida.

You may also have noticed that the focus of the blog has shifted from workers’ compensation and medical travel to health care, especially as the debate here in the US has gotten more attention over the ACA and Single Payer, as well as the myriad schemes some are trying to force down the throats of Americans that keep the status quo.

The blog has been viewed nearly 40,000 times over the six years, but at no time have I ever made any money from it, yet that was my intention when I began. I thought my writing would convince someone of my talent and skills. Sadly, that has not happened.

In fact, there are days where only a handful of individuals view my blog, but I push on. How long that will continue, I don’t know, or is up to you.

You’ve no doubt seen my posts for positions or opportunities, so why don’t you reach out to me.

You know where to find me.