Tag Archives: Third year anniversary

Three Years and Counting

Today, October 29, 2015, marks three years since I began writing this blog.

Before you offer your congratulations, let me tell you that the third year has been the hardest year to write for.

Why that is so is because there has been less written in the blogosphere about workers’ comp that is new and different from all the other years I have been writing.

After writing about the opioid abuse issue, the constitutionality of the exclusive remedy provision of the “grand bargain”, and the expansion of opt-out, among other challenges facing workers’ comp. there isn’t a whole hell of a lot that hasn’t been discussed ad infinitum.

You may have noticed that some of my posts more recently have shifted into the health care arena, and I have attempted to tie those issue to workers’ comp and implementing medical travel.

I have tried this year to get brokers, carriers, and employers to contact me personally by including an action statement at the end of every post, but even those had to be discarded when there was no response.

Yet, I persist in writing. Perhaps I am doing exactly what I have criticized the industry for doing, that is, doing the same thing over and over again, and expecting different results. However, in my case, I firmly believe that what I am doing is right, and have been fortunate this year to finally find some independent person who has the same idea (more on that at a later date).

One thing I have noticed is that as I re-publish my previous posts through Twitter and LinkedIn, especially with the help of Buffer, that I have been getting a few more views, and a few more “likes” on my articles than I did when they were first published.

I would prefer that I get more attention to what I am advocating and can turn my writing into a profitable venture that will provide me with steady income, but most importantly, give injured workers and their employers the opportunity to get better medical care and to save money.

The savings may not be there on a one-to-one basis, but in the aggregate, it may pay off, especially as health care costs in the US continue to rise unabated.

And I have continued to defend my idea to those of limited vision and understanding, because I know the direction human society is going, and I know that one day, it will not matter where one gets medical care, or any other service. A little known part of the TPP now being considered is called TISA, the Trade in Services Agreement, which I have been told, will be signed into law in the near future.

What impact that will have on the transfer of services is yet unknown, but many believe it will open up markets for such services as medical travel, as other trade agreements have opened up markets for goods and capital transfers, not to mention jobs.

So, I am optimistic that somehow this will happen. In the meantime, I continue to write as long as my fingers and brain allow me to write. Thank you for sticking with me these past three years.