Tag Archives: socialism

Despicable!

“Capital is reckless of the health or length of life of the laborer, unless under compulsion from society.”

Karl Marx

“Our policy is to create a national health service in order to ensure that everybody in the country irrespective of means, age, sex or occupation shall have equal opportunities to benefit from the best and most up-to-date medical and allied services available.”

Winston Churchill

 

Here we have two quotes dealing with the same subject. The first quote is from the father of Scientific Socialism, i.e., Marxism and Communism, and the second quote is from the wartime Prime Minister of Great Britain, who was a staunch anti-Communist.

But what transpired today in Washington, is far from the view of Marx, or the view of Churchill. In other words, it is DESPICABLE!

Never before in the history of the United States, has the government of the people, by the people, and for the people ever taken away something the government gave them in the first place.

Not even the enactment of the 18th Amendment outlawing the sale and production of alcohol, stoops to the level of total disregard for the health and welfare of the American people. Alcohol was never something the government had to give to people, they produced it themselves. Our founding fathers were brewers and distillers of alcoholic beverages.

But the vote this afternoon represents a step towards a society this nation has not seen in many decades. You hear that Republicans want to take the country back. The obvious place they want to take us to is the 19th century, when no one had health care, there was no Medicare or Medicaid, or Social Security, Unemployment Insurance, and Workers’ Comp.

There are specific reasons for this, which I will discuss.

First, pure and simple, it is greed. They want the money dedicated for health care and the other medical plans for a huge tax cut for their wealthy friends.

Second, the health insurance companies can now get to pick and choose who they want to cover, what they will cover, and what they will charge you if you have a serious pre-existing condition or a life-threatening disease. We know this as adverse selection.

Third, they don’t believe in giving “entitlements” to anyone except the military and the wealthy.

Fourth, their libertarian, puritanical, Calvinism teaches them that the poor are undeserving of the benefits that money brings, so let them die, and who cares if they are poor, it is a sign of a moral failing.

Another quote from Churchill says that you can always trust the Americans to do the right thing after they have tried everything else.

Well, after today, we have tried everything else. We have given employers the right to offer health insurance to their employees, we have allowed private insurance companies to sell policies to individuals, and we have created separate health care plans for children, the elderly, the military and their families, members of Congress, and the poor.

But for all the reasons I have given above, and many more, this nation refuses to enact single payer health care, the only thing we haven’t tried, and the one form of universal health care every other Western nation provides its citizens.

One fellow blogger last year during the Democratic Primary, said that while he liked Bernie Sanders, he knew that the health insurance companies were not going to scrape their businesses and start from scratch.

But maybe they should. It is because the capitalist profit motive is at the heart of what, in the words of Walter Cronkite, our health care system really is. “America’s health care system is neither healthy, caring, nor a system.” Too many are profiting from other people’s misery, and driving many into poverty. This is the richest nation on Earth, and this is how we treat our fellow citizens.

It is strange that the Conservative Party of Great Britain believes in single payer, but the American Republican Party does not. The truth is, they are no longer the Republican Party but the Republican Libertarian Party.

Once upon a time, members of their right-wing decried the nation’s drift towards “Creeping Socialism.” With this vote, and with executive orders flowing from 1600 every day, we are witnessing “Creeping Fascism.’ The new Secretary of Labor comes from the fast food industry where workers were mistreated, and still are in some places.

Worker’s rights are being eroded with new overtime rules, wages are stagnant, unemployment is still too high despite what the government says.

One other reason for enacting single payer is that doing so will free employers from having to provide it to their employees, and workers over forty will not have to face losing their jobs and careers they spent their lives in.

We, as a nation, must decide; either we take away health care for millions of Americans, or we make sure everyone has it. There can be no half-measures. Many pundits have said the AHCA (Zombie Health Care Bill) will not pass the Senate, but that is what they said about the House of Representatives.

I hope the Senate will defeat this, but if they don’t, the only option left is single payer.

A History Lesson: What it Means for the Health Care and Workers’ Comp Industries

Allow me to take off my blogger’s cap, and put away my MHA degree, and write about something I do know a lot about, and that is American history. After all, the MA after my name means “Master of Arts”.

On September 6, 1901, President William McKinley, was shot by Leon Czolgosz, an anarchist, and died on September 14th. McKinley, who had been re-elected the previous November, was succeeded by his second Vice-President, Theodore Roosevelt.

When Roosevelt became the 26th President, the course of American history changed forever, or so it seemed, through most of the twentieth century. The fact that it did not completely change the course of history is the subject of this essay.

You are probably wondering what impact this all has on the American health care system, and workers’ compensation in particular.

The answer to that can be found in a statement made decades later by the anti-tax lobbyist and Bush 43 White House aide, Grover Norquist, who said, “his goal is to bring America back to what it was “up until Teddy Roosevelt, when the socialists took over…

It was Roosevelt who first proposed national health insurance that future presidents, both Republican (Nixon) and Democrats wanted to create. Roosevelt also passed the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1904, which created the FDA, and led to food and drug safety.

For several decades in the late 19th century, progressive reformers had unsuccessfully tried to change things, and not always peacefully, as the various riots and bombings and strikes can attest to.

But after Roosevelt, and after his defeat in the 1912 election, progressives moved closer to the Democratic Party, first under Woodrow Wilson, then twenty years later, under Teddy’s cousin, Franklin.

It was during Taft’s last years in office, and Wilson’s first years, when workers’ comp laws were enacted by states. And in the years to follow, such reforms as direct election of senators, the right to vote for women, end of child labor, the right of unions to strike and bargain collectively were won, and unemployment insurance, social security, welfare, and many other social programs were created.

But some thirty-five years ago, that began to change, when men like Norquist became President, Senators, and Congressmen, and a slow process of destroying the social safety net began.

We are seeing this in the resistance to, and threat of repeal of the ACA, the assault on statutory workers’ comp through the expansion of opt-out, and the corruption of the workers’ compensation system by carriers, employers, judges, lawyers, physicians, and service providers.

To illustrate this point, David De Paolo wrote today about responses to two previous posts he wrote, in which several respondents made threatening remarks towards persons’ unknown, who had heaped further injury on already injured workers.

While I do not advocate personal harm towards any one claims person (I was one myself a long time ago, and was threatened, or so I was told, but never by whom), I have expressed the opinion that those who inflict pain on those already in pain, are inviting trouble. But that is to be directed towards the system, not a person.

In response to an article by Jodi Mathy about the employee experience of claim management, I said that such action should be,

“Not against claims people, but against a system that causes pain to people who are already in pain. WC was supposed to ameliorate the harshness of the laissez-faire, industrial revolution, not redistribute wealth. If that was the case, claims awards would be in millions.”

To further drive home this point, I quoted the following:

Capital is reckless of the health or length of life of the laborer, unless under compulsion from society.”

Karl Marx

Now before any of you see red stars, or hammers and sickles before your eyes, calm down. I only quoted him because what he said was true when he wrote it, and could be true again in the future, if we allow ourselves to be deluded by those like Norquist who want to go back and party like it’s 1899.

So if you are afraid of socialism, just remember these inconvenient truths, or facts. One, many of us alive today would never have gone to college without socialism. Two, our parents would not have gone to college either, especially those who fought in WWII, Korea, and other conflicts. Three, our parents would not have been able to retire to Florida, Arizona, or anywhere else without Social Security, and would not have gotten medical care after 65 without Medicare, and if they were poor, Medicaid.

Four, all of you no doubt has flown for both business or pleasure. Do you not like the idea that there is a federal agency, the FAA that regulates airlines, and oversees airports? What about interstate highways, railroads, cruise ships, etc.? All of that because of socialism, although a limited form of socialism.

Last week, the GOP elected a new speaker, Paul Ryan. A while back, it occurred to me that since Ryan was a devotee of Ayn Rand, and Rand Paul was running for president, that there was a curious connection between the three of them. If you take Ayn Rand, then Rand Paul, then Paul Ryan, put their names together, you get “AynRandPaulRyan”, and if you take Ryan’s name, drop the “R” and move the “y” after the “a”, you get back to where you started.

It doesn’t mean anything, but it is curious, given their libertarian values.

And getting back to where we started, i.e., in 1789, is no way to run a modern, post-industrial society, so yes, history does matter, and both health care and workers’ comp will be the worse off if we forget it, as per Santayana.