Tag Archives: physicians

Beware Billionaires Against Medicare for All

This week, the former CEO of everyone’s favorite coffee house and time waster, Starbucks, declared that he was considering a run for president next year as an independent.

This announcement brought immediate response from both wings of the Democratic Party, as they said it would result in the re-election of the current occupant of the White House.

Even former NYC Mayor, Michael Bloomberg, another billionaire, said that he should not run.

However, as this is a blog about medical care, and not politics, I will leave the discussion as to the efficacy of an independent run for president by another billionaire for others.

What I do want to focus on is this overpaid former barista’s belief that the US cannot afford a Medicare for All, single-payer health care system.

Incidentally, this is also Bloomberg’s view as well.

But I do not think their opposition is based solely on the belief that Medicare for All, single-payer is too expensive. Rather, I believe they are afraid that after the results of last November’s midterm elections, the Democratic Party is poised to win back the White House and possibly the Senate, and that Medicare for All, in whatever form it takes, will be enacted.

I have written about the health care industry’s efforts to derail Medicare for All in previous posts. (See the following: https://wp.me/p2QJfz-QIyhttps://wp.me/p2QJfz-Jki, and https://wp.me/p2QJfz-WI5)

While I cannot accuse Schultz and Bloomberg of being in the pocket of the healthcare industry, it does look suspicious that now that the Democrats control the House, they are coming out against a health care plan that many Americans voted for when they voted for Democrats.

But billionaires should not be the ones deciding whether or not we enact Medicare for All. That should be up to the voters (patients and non-patients), their elected representatives, and most importantly, those in the medical profession who believe the time has come for Medicare for All, single-payer.

One such group are physicians themselves, as reported back in August in the magazine of the Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), which I was informed of this morning by a high school alumnus who posted the article on another alum’s Facebook post.

The article was originally posted in Jacobinmag.com.

Here is the link to the article by Meagan Day.

One caveat to progressives: Don’t assume that every American voter who is undecided, declared themselves as an independent, or are unhappy with their choice in the last presidential election, and his behavior and actions, will vote for your chosen candidate. That is why Schultz is contemplating running. And he can do a lot of damage to your plans for 2020.

 

 

Those Damn Models Again – Health Care As An Experiment in Bait & Switch

Another shout out to Dr. McCanne, who posted today about a study sponsored by the AMA and conducted by RAND that basically said that alternative payment models (APM) are affecting physicians, their practices and hospitals.

Here is the RAND Summary with key findings:

RAND
October 24, 2018
Effects of Health Care Payment Models on Physician Practice in the United States
By Mark W. Friedberg, et al
This report, sponsored by the American Medical Association (AMA), describes how alternative payment models (APMs) affect physicians, physicians’ practices, and hospital systems in the United States and also provides updated data to the original 2014 study. Payment models discussed are core payment (fee for service, capitation, episode-based and bundled), supplementary payment (shared savings, pay for performance, retainer-based), and combined payment (medical homes and accountable care organizations). The effects of changes since 2014 in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and of new alternative payment models (APMs), such as the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) Quality Payment Program (QPP), are also examined.
Key Findings
Payment models are changing at an accelerating pace
Physician practices, health systems, and consultants find it difficult to keep up with the proliferation of new models, with some calling for a “time out” to allow them to better adapt to current APMs.
Payment models are increasing in complexity
Alternative payment models have become increasingly complex since 2014. Practices that have invested in understanding complex APMs have found opportunities to earn financial awards for their preexisting quality — without materially changing patient care.
Risk aversion is more prominent among physician practices
Risk aversion among physician practices was more prominent. Risk-averse practices sought to avoid downside risk or to off-load downside risk to partners (e.g., hospitals and device manufacturers) when possible.
RAND press release

https://www.rand.org/news/press/2018/10/24.html

Here is the comment by Don McCanne:

There is much more here than a casual glance might imply. The search for value-based payment in health care, as opposed to paying for volume, has led to various payment models such as shared savings, accountable care organizations, bundled payments, pay for performance (P4P), medical homes, and other alternative payment models. How well is that working?
To date, most studies have been quite disappointing. Claims of cost savings are belied when considering the additional provider costs of information technology and human manpower devoted to these models, not to mention the high emotional cost of burnout. This RAND study shows that these models are increasing in complexity, making it difficult for the health delivery system to keep up. Even worse, they are inducing risk aversion. The health care providers are trying to avoid those who most need health care – the opposite of what our health care system should be delivering.
Much of the experimentation in delivery models has been centered around reward or punishment. But, as Alfie Kohn writes, “intrinsic motivation (wanting to do something for its own sake)… is the best predictor of high-quality achievement,” whereas “extrinsic motivation (for example, doing something in order to snag a goody)” can actually undermine intrinsic motivation. It has been observed by others that the personal satisfaction of achievement of patient health care goals is tremendously rewarding, whereas the token rewards based on meager quality measurements are often insulting because of the implication that somehow token payments are a greater motivator than fulfilling Hippocratic traditions. Even more insulting are the token penalties for falling on the wrong side of the bell curve simply as a result of making efforts to care for patients with greater medical or sociological difficulties.
Quoting Alfie Kohn again, “carrots or sticks… can never create a lasting commitment to an action or a value, and often they have exactly the opposite effect … contrary to hypothesis.” The RAND report suggests slowing down and working with these models some more while increasing investment in data management and analysis with the goal of increasing success with alternative payment models. No. These models are making things worse. It’s time to abandon them and get back with taking care of our patients. The payment model we need is an improved version of Medicare that takes care of everyone. Throw out the sticks and carrots.

 

But however we see it, from the point of view of carrots and sticks as not able to change behavior, or by introducing ever newer models of alternative payments, the end result is the same.

Health care suffers because of the wasteful, bureaucratic, and arbitrary imposition of models that only serve to make life for physicians and hospitals harder, and makes health care more expensive and complex.

As Dr. McCanne says above, throw out the carrots and the sticks. Get rid of the models that don’t work and go to a single payer system that is streamlined and less bureaucratic and arbitrary.

GSK is paying docs again — and patients are the worse off

A shout out to Maria Todd for bringing this to my attention.

This would not be happening if we did what every other Western nation does, and give our citizens universal health care that does not line the pockets of multinational corporations, drug companies, medical device manufacturers, and Wall Street investors.

Health care should not be subject to the pursuit of profit.

One of the world’s largest drug makers, GSK promised it would no longer pay doctors to promote its medicines. Now it says doing so put it at a disadvantage.

Source: GSK is paying docs again — and patients are the worse off

Botched Beauty: The Dark Side of Medical Travel

Richard’s Note: The episode of The Doctors TV show mentioned below is not a complete episode. There are multiple videos on the website of the show. It will take some patience to watch them all. Sorry for the confusion.

While channel surfing, I came across the Fox program, The Doctors. They were investigating botched surgeries performed as part of a medical travel experience. One woman died as a result of an uncertified physician and facility; the other woman cannot have plastic surgery on her posterior again after a botched Brazilian butt lift.

The woman who died was the aunt of one of the audience members.

Here is the video of the episode that aired today. I suggest the industry leaders watch this.

https://www.thedoctorstv.com/episodes/doctors-investigate-botched-beauty-across-border-can-you-buy-better-body-another-country

All parties responsible for medical travel must do a better job of policing and cleaning up the industry. This cannot keep happening without anyone doing anything about it. That is why it is not seeing an increase in patients going overseas. It’s your fault, so take responsibility. CLEAN UP YOUR ACT.

Physician practices seek help in transition to value-based care | Healthcare Dive

Follow-up to the last post and yesterday’s regarding CMS’ initiative for quality reporting.

See the link:

The report also found physicians are moving more toward independent and physician-led group practices after a six-year trend of doctors moving to hospitals.

Source: Physician practices seek help in transition to value-based care | Healthcare Dive

More doctors become hospital employees, facing noncompetes | Healthcare Dive

The proletarianization of physicians marches on. As you recall from my reviews of “Health Care under the Knife”, there has been a steady movement towards making physicians into employees of hospitals, or rather their proletarianization. Now it seems they are up against noncompetes, as the article below reports.

Here is the link to the article:

Legal experts say noncompete agreements are common practice for hospitals, and are usually enforceable. But physicians, and in some cases the courts, are pushing back.

Source: More doctors become hospital employees, facing noncompetes | Healthcare Dive

Number of Foreign Doctors Coming to US Dropping

As reported this morning in the weblog, Working Immigrants, the number of foreign born doctors wanting to come to the US is dropping, which may have a significant impact on the availability of doctors in certain parts of the country and in many hospitals and clinics, especially those that serve underserved and lower-income communities.

According to Working Immigrants, there are more than 247,000 doctors with medical degrees from foreign countries practicing in the US.

They make up slightly more than one-quarter of all doctors, and most are not US citizens, and are foreign-born as well.

One of the channels of immigration of foreign-born and foreign trained doctors is through graduate medical study. This year, just over 7,000 international medical graduates applied to study in the US, representing a downturn of 217 from last year, and nearly 400 from 2016.

Nearly 25% of residents across all medical fields were born outside the US in 2015, and in subspecialty residency programs, foreign medical graduates accounted for more than one-third of residents.

As I indicated above, foreign-trained doctors are more likely to practice in lower-income and disadvantaged communities than their American counterparts,

Where more than 30% of the population lives below the poverty rate, nearly one-third of the doctors are foreign-trained. And where per-capita income is below $15,000 per year, 42.5% of all doctors are foreign-trained. Finally, where 75% or more of the population is non-white, 36.2% of the doctors are foreign-trained.

This trend will most likely impact the predicted physician shortage that has been previously reported in this blog. In addition, it will add to the burden hospitals are facing in providing care as many of these immigrants work in hospitals to augment the staff shortages they already have.

If this trend continues thanks to current administration policy and xenophobia, the problem will only get worse. The reader should be aware that to even get into the US to practice medicine is a long and difficult process and many physicians do not get in to the country.

Instead of turning away good doctors from foreign countries, we should welcome them and keep them working in the areas of the country where they are practicing and providing care to those who otherwise would not have a doctor to go to.