Tag Archives: Mexico

Trump Esta Loco: What it May Mean for Cross-Border Healthcare

In picking a fight with Mexico over the building of a wall on the US/Mexico border, the current illegitimate occupant of the Oval Office is not only threatening the relationship with our nearest neighbor to the South, but with our number two trading partner, as the following stats point out for 2016:

2016 : U.S. trade in goods with Mexico
Total 2016 Exports: 211,848.7
Imports: 270,647.2
Net: -58,798.6

Source: https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c2010.html

By threatening to slap a 20% import tax on goods from Mexico, including his ties, this so-called businessman, will hurt the very farmers who voted for him, as well as the workers who buy their household goods from Walmart and other low-cost outlets, as many parts or food items are made or grown in Mexico. When I spoke at a medical tourism conference in Reynosa in 2014, we drove along the border area where the maquiladoras are located and saw that one of them makes frozen food that is sold across the border. Want to pay 20% more for that frozen TV dinner?

Then there is all that cerveza and tequila and mescal, not to mention avocados and guacamole that will cost more. Stay very thirsty my friends, because it will cost you more to drink with the most interesting man in the world, and all thanks to the least interesting man in the world.

What then does this mean for cross-border medical care?

If Herr Trump gets his way, not only will Mexican goods get more expensive, but if we get into a trade war, look for costs of medical care south of the border to go up as well, or even slow to a crawl or not at all. There is a hospital being built in Tijuana with the assistance of Scripps Health, and as I’ve written about in the past, the Insurance Company of the West already writes workers’ comp policies to include cross-border healthcare for their insured’s whose employees live in Mexico, but work in California.

Since the passage of NAFTA, trade between the US and Mexico has increased, and the towns along the border have benefitted from it. Back then, the talk of building a NAFTA superhighway was met with strong and fierce resistance (I was living in Texas at the time), but I realized that we already had one. It’s called Interstate 35, and runs from the Canadian border to the Mexican border, as does Interstate 5 on the West Coast.

In two earlier posts, I discussed a case in Arizona where the injured worker received two benefits, one from Mexico and one from Arizona (https://richardkrasner.wordpress.com/2014/01/20/nafta-work-comp-and-cross-border-medical-care-a-legal-view/) and (https://richardkrasner.wordpress.com/2015/02/04/nafta-work-comp-and-cross-border-medical-care-a-legal-view-update/).

So before you book that trip to Cancun for your tummy tuck or face lift, check to see if there is a 20% tax imposed on your flight, hotel, food, etc., from either the US or Mexican governments. If so, thank the orange-haired son of an orangutan.

donaldtrump-orangutan

How Employers (and Medical Travel Facilitators) Can Deal With Zika

Teresa Bartlett, wrote last Friday in Insurance Thought Leadership.com about the precautions employers can take to avoid the Zika virus, and how to think about it.

She raises the following questions, and gives insightful answers:

  •  Where Is Zika Spreading?
  • What Are the Symptoms?
  • How Is Zika Treated?
  • What Special Precautions Should Be Taken by Pregnant Women?
  • What Should Employers Do?

The entire article can be read here.

Now that summer is almost upon us in the US, employers and those in other industries, like health care and medical travel, as well as the travel industry itself, should be fully aware of these facts.

Only time will tell before we have native cases of Zika here. You must be prepared.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Comp Blog is now viewed all over the world in over 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Cross-Border Health Care in California Expands

In my earlier posts on cross-border health care, “Cross-border Workers’ Compensation a Reality in California“, “NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View“, “NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View: Update“, and “Cross-border Health Care and the ACA“, I discussed the way some Mexican workers living in Mexico, but working in the US or traveling between the US and Mexico, have been able to get health care on both sides of the border.

An article in Fierce Healthcare.com last month,  says that Scripps Health will help run a hospital in Tijuana, along with Sistemas Medicos Nacionales S.A. de C.V. (SIMNSA).

SIMNSA is the medical insurer in Mexico that the Insurance Company of the West (ICW) contracted with some time ago to treat Mexican workers of ICW’s US insureds in the San Diego/Imperial Valley area of CA.

According to the article by Ilene MacDonald, the insurer will design, build and operate the facility, and will seek accreditation from the international arm of the Joint Commission, the Joint Commission International (JCI), and will be an affiliate of the Scripps Health Network.

Those who think that cross-border health care, whether general or work comp-related is not going to happen better think again, because it is, and while this is just now involving the areas along the US-Mexico border, with or without that stupid wall some jerk wants to build and have Mexico pay for, medical travel on this continent is moving forward.

The only thing that is not happening yet is travel further down into Mexico and into the other countries in Central and South America. But that will happen, no matter what you or any putz running for president says.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Blog is now viewed all over the world in 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

More on Zika and Medical Travel

Ian Youngman posted the following article on IMTJ.com last Friday.

http://www.imtj.com/articles/does-zika-pose-threat-medical-tourism/

This is in addition to the posts I wrote last month, “Will Zika Impact Medical Travel to Latin America?“, “Insurers’ Have Zika on Radar“, “OSHA To Weigh In On Interim Guidelines for Zika this Spring“, and “Zika to Cost Latin America and Caribbean $3.5B“.

 

‘Turkishmaninacanstan’ Strikes Back

Readers of this blog know that from time to time, I have had to criticize those in the workers’ comp industry for their short-sightedness, narrow-mindedness, excessive American Exceptionalism, “Know-nothingism”,  xenophobia and subtle racism.

But when a well-respected online journal re-posts an article by the chief anti-medical travel opponent in the workers’ comp world, it is high time that the medical travel industry speak up and defend itself.

As a tireless advocate for medical travel in workers’ comp, I am leading the charge that you, my friends around the world must do for yourselves.

You will notice the title of this post. This is what the individual in question calls those countries that provide medical travel services. Also, please note that by using this canard as my title, I am in no way insulting Turkey, or any other nation that markets their medical care to the world.

There is fair criticism of Turkey and many other countries in the medical travel industry, but those criticisms are meant to improve the services and to correct the mistakes of the past, and not to pass judgement on them.

But when someone uses a term such as ‘Turkishmaninacanstan’, it conjures up the worse images of third world poverty and backwardness in all aspects of life of the nations so broadly brushed with that epithet.

The individual who coined that despicable name is a self-styled, right-wing American conservative who lives on the gulf coast of the state of Florida, a region where many individuals like him retire to after their careers have declined to play golf.

While this individual may not be one of those just yet, the fact that he dismisses new ideas, that he insults the millions of men and women around the world who are trying to offer real low cost medical care at equal or better quality, that he insults the very nations who could use those resources they are spending to bring medical travelers to their countries as a way to improve their balance of trade and economic power in the global economy, when they could be used to raise the living standards of their poorest citizens, is something that can no longer go unanswered.

So, I ask all of you, doctors, nurses, travel agents, medical tourism promoters and facilitators who are legitimately trying to provide better medical care at lower cost to all of the world’s citizens, to speak up and tell this individual and those like him, that your countries are not ‘Turkishmaninacanstans’, and that you are developing world-class medical facilities that outshine those in his own country, and mine.

Basically, he is calling you con artists and frauds, and that is something that only you can stop.

 

 

 

 

Texas State House Seeks to Change Rules for Workers’ Comp

As reported this morning by Elena Mejia in the Houston Chronicle, members of a Texas State House committee are calling for major reforms to that state’s workers’ compensation program that would change coverage rules that now leave thousands of workers uninsured.

Yesterday, the House Committee on Business and Industry questioned state Insurance Department officials at length about employers who are now failing to provide coverage and continuing complaints about the state’s designated-doctor program.

Texas was the first and only state to allow employers to opt-out of the statutory workers’ comp system until Oklahoma passed legislation, that has since been ruled unconstitutional by the Oklahoma Workers’ Compensation Commission.

Testimony given before the committee indicated that participation by physicians in the Designated Doctor Program, in which state-approved doctors examine injured workers to decide claims in disputed cases, has dropped precipitously.

According to Stephen Norwood of the Texas Orthopedic Association, participation is down 67 percent, mostly because the state does not reimburse physicians enough for expenses to travel to remote locations.

Mr. Norwood stated that, “All this time away and expense often unexpectedly to remote locations doesn’t make it feasible for physicians to participate,”… “If you allowed proper specialists to evaluate several workers during same travel, you increase access of workers to more appropriate exams and more efficiency to physicians.”

This testimony caught my eye, as generally, I don’t write specifically about one state, but take an overall, big picture view of the issues surrounding workers’ comp and discuss how medical travel can be implemented to relieve those issues.

This would be a perfect scenario for such implementation, so that injured workers in remote parts of Texas can get their treatment in Mexico that may be less expensive to travel to, rather than to have physicians to take the time and expense to travel to those remote locations.

But I suspect that that solution will elude the Texas legislators like so many other issues have eluded them, such as allowing women the right to have abortions, or the right of all workers to be covered under a mandatory state workers’ comp system that is fair to both injured workers and their employers.

But that would be asking too much of them. Sort of like asking the village idiot from Texas to not think about going to war in two countries at the same time.

 

Cross-border Health Care and the ACA

From the ‘before you go to the WCRI conference’ department is an article about a subject not on the agenda in Boston this week, and since I convinced the WCRI that crossing the Hudson river is not medical travel, nonetheless, people are leaving the country and one US state for medical care, and not just for work-related issues.

Jim Arriola, COO of MediExcel Health in California, and Caitlin Gadel, an attorney at Seaton, Peters & Revnew, wrote an article this month in California Broker magazine (pg. 20-22), outlining how cross-border health plans in California are complying with many of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

You may recall that I wrote about cross-border health care, especially for workers’ comp, in my article, “Cross-border Workers’ Compensation a Reality in California“, as well as these two articles, “NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View” and “NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View: Update“.

According to the article, almost twenty years ago, the California Department of Managed Health Care (DMHC), began regulating a consumer driven phenomena for receiving employer-sponsored health coverage south of the border.

As stated in the article, on a daily basis, up to 40,000 workers cross the border from Mexico to work in California. These workers and their families live in Mexico, and prefer to get their medical care in Mexico.

Changes to the Knox-Keen HMO Act allowed US and Mexican health plans to establish cross-border coverage. Much of this is occurring in the San Diego and Imperial county area, as discussed in “Cross-border Workers’ Compensation a Reality in California” with the Mexican HMO, SIMNSA, as well as others such as Blue Shield of CA, Health Net, Cigna, Aetna, and MediExcel Health Plan.

Depending upon the benefits of the plan, some cross-border coverage plans have premiums that are 40% to 50% lower than those in California.

There are an estimated 60,000 enrollees in various health coverage plans in California, and some experts predict the total number will increase to over 100,000 as more employers offer coverage as a result of the ACA rules and regulations, according to Gadel and Arriola.

Gadel and Arriola report that many ACA provisions (as well as the thousands of pages of regulations), apply to cross-border coverage, especially if the coverage is not a qualified expatriate plan.

Gadel and Arriola advanced the idea that some brokers may be concerned whether a cross-border plan satisfies the ACA definition of a minimu-essential coverage (MEC) when the provider network is in Mexico.

They also said that legal experts have noted that under federal regulations, employer-sponsored plans approved by state regulators are MEC plans.

In order to receive approval from the DMHC, such plans must submit evidence of their compliance with ACA regulations.

Brokers, it is suggested by the authors should not offer cross-border plans exclusively because of the differences between cross-border plans and expatriate plans.

However, the authors note, because of the complexity of the ACA’s conflicting interpretations, some cross-border plans may have been erroneously classified themselves as group expatriate coverage.

The reality, they say, is that the vast majority of cross-border plans and their enrollees do not meet the federal criteria for expatriate classification.

My last post, “Borderless Healthcare: A Model for the Future of Medical Care in Workers’ Comp” was based upon a presentation given last Thursday about medical tourism to Mexico. So if there are health care plans in California providing cross-border health care into Mexico, and there is also cross-border workers’ comp occurring between California and Mexico, and in both of these cases, the mode of transporatation is generally automotive, and the presentation by Manatt, Phelps & Phillips requires airfare to Mexico, why is it that workers’ comp cannot do the same?

I don’t want to hear excuses, I want to hear why this industry refuses to join the 21st century, why it points to laws and statutes nearly a hundred years old that restrict injured workers to their own states or to the US for medical care requiring expensive orthopedic surgery, when there are less expensive and better alternatives a short flight away?

A fellow blogger wrote today about this industry’s failure to fully embrace technology, and the answer to his questions, and to mine were right there…if this industry were to change, the status quo would be undone and many companies would be forced to go out of business and their profits with them.

Our workers’ comp “system” mirrors the general health care system in many ways, as per this quote from Uncle Walter:

“America’s health care system is neither healthy, caring, nor a system.”

Walter Cronkite

It is a profit-making endevour that preys upon the sick and injured and lines the pockets of lawyers and vendors. That is why no one in this industry is listening to us…greed.