Tag Archives: Medicare for All

Could Medicare for All Solve the healthcare cost problem? – Managed Care Matters

Following on the heels of yesterday’s post from Joe, today’s post covers the cost of healthcare, and what Medicare for All could do to solve it.

Recently, two billionaires, Former NY Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former barista-in-chief Howard Schultz have both said that the US cannot afford Medicare for All/Single Payer health care.

But if we look at Joe’s article, and his subsequent ones later this week, can we afford not to?

You decide.

Here’s Joe’s article:

This week we are unpacking Single Payer/Medicare for All to better understand the many variations of SP/MFA and now they are different, how those variations might work, and whether some version is a) politically viable and b) would solve the … Continue reading Could Medicare for All Solve the healthcare cost problem?

Source: Could Medicare for All Solve the healthcare cost problem? – Managed Care Matters

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What’s all this about Single Payer and Medicare For All? – Managed Care Matters

Once again, my fellow blogger, Joe Paduda hits it out of the ballpark in explaining Single Payer and Medicare For All.

Most of what you hear comes from politicians and a few billionaires, one running for President and one not; one a former barista, the other a former big city mayor.

But there is also a lot of misinformation and wrong information on the Internet, especially on social media sites like LinkedIn, where the professionals in the health care or insurance space spout off their opposition to Single Payer/Medicare For All mostly because it will disrupt their businesses and may even cost them their jobs. But never mind that millions of Americans can’t afford insurance, or have very little insurance to protect them in case of severe illness or disease.

These individuals are not physicians, nor are they executives with insurance companies, or hospitals; but rather, they are consultants and analysts who offer their services to the health care industry.

But not all commenters are in the health care field, many are just average business people or citizens who put their two cents into the discussion threads, without knowing what they are talking about, or without any facts to back up their argument.

One common refrain is that Single Payer/Medicare For All is government-controlled health care. It isn’t, it’s government financed health care, but to their minds, any time the government pays for something, they “control” it.

So, Joe’s article today is sorely need to clear up any misconceptions.

Here it is:

It’s the worst kind of government over-reach. It’s an easy solution to a huge problem that will cost nothing. And everything in between. Between now and Election Day you are going to hear a lot about Medicare for All and … Continue reading What’s all this about Single Payer and Medicare For All?

Source: What’s all this about Single Payer and Medicare For All? – Managed Care Matters

Benefits Industry Leaders Warned About Medicare for All

It is amazing, but not surprising that we are seeing more and more business leaders coming out to prevent Americans from getting single payer health care under an improved and expanded Medicare for All.

The following article from BenefitsPro.com is aimed at warning the benefits industry not to underestimate single payer, and advises them on how to deal with this.

Naturally, it is all about selling a product to make a profit from not covering all Americans, and only those who get their health insurance from their employers, since that is what the article discusses.

They don’t care about the millions who are uninsured, under-insured, or who can’t afford insurance, let alone the cost of prescription drugs and medically necessary treatments. What matters to them is how many benefit packages they can sell to employers.

One thing to note from the article, Nelson Griswold said the following at the NextGen Growth & Leadership Summit:

“Once a country has moved to government-controlled health care, it has never gone back. My prediction is that we’ll have single payer in five years.”

I hope he’s right, as far as his prediction is concerned. However, he is also right about one other thing, No country has or will give up their current system for the one we have here in the US. They would be crazy to do so, and we are crazy for not doing what they have been doing for many years, and they are doing ok with theirs.

Change is hard, but once change happens, people generally feel that the change was worth it, and that all the worrying and apprehension over that change was misplaced, misguided, and silly.

So it will be with Medicare for All. They said the same thing about Medicare, and they recruited a has-been actor who would later turn politician to scare the living daylights out of seniors with the phrase, “socialized medicine.” Now, many Americans like Medicare. And the term, “socialized medicine” has another meaning. It means that capitalist medicine is better than socialized medicine, but that too has been proven wrong.

Anyway, here’s the link to this warning shot across the bow of single payer from an unexpected sector of the medical-industrial complex and consulting industry.

https://www.benefitspro.com/2019/02/08/why-single-payer-may-be-closer-than-you-think-and-what-to-do-about-it/?kw=Why%20single-payer%20may%20be%20closer%20than%20you%20think%20%28and%20what%20to%20do%20about%20it%29&slreturn=20190113103133

 

Lower Prescription Drug Prices Lure Americans To Mexico To Buy Meds : Shots – Health News : NPR

Good morning all.

Thanks go out to Josef Woodman who tweeted the following today from NPR about prescription drugs and going across the Mexican border to buy them at lower cost.

This is in addition to the article I recently posted, Run for the Border (Not a Taco Bell Commercial).

So wall, or no wall, Americans are going to look for cheaper prescription drugs, either in Mexico or Canada, or elsewhere, until we allow the government to negotiate prices for medications under an improved and expanded Medicare for All.

But thanks to a former Louisiana congressman who left Congress to become the President and CEO of PhRMA, a pharmaceutical company lobbying group, Congress passed a bill that prevents Medicare from negotiating lower drug prices and bans the importation of identical, cheaper, drugs from Canada and elsewhere.

But it does not have to be this way. We can lower drug prices, but by allowing the government to negotiate them, and not giving the pharmaceutical industry huge giveaways.

Here is NPR’s article:

Faced with high U.S. prices for prescription drugs, some Americans cross the border to buy insulin pens and other meds. At least 1 insurer reimburses flights to the border to make such purchases easy.

Source: Lower Prescription Drug Prices Lure Americans To Mexico To Buy Meds : Shots – Health News : NPR

Hospital Mergers Improve Health? Evidence Shows the Opposite – The New York Times

Yesterday’s post, Hospital lobby ramps up ‘Medicare for all’ opposition | Healthcare Dive, suggested that moving towards an improved and expanded Medicare for All system would force hospitals to close, so the article below in today’s New York Times would seem to argue that the urge to merge does not improve health.

So on the one hand, if we adopt a democratic socialist approach to health care, hospitals may close; yet, if we allow them to follow capitalist economic laws regarding economies of scale, they don’t offer better care.

Perhaps, then it is better to try the democratic socialist approach, because the economies of scale approach has not worked, and let’s see if hospitals do close, or they see an increase in patients due to more people being covered.

Hospital lobby ramps up ‘Medicare for all’ opposition | Healthcare Dive

Sound the alarm bells, the health care industry is trying to prevent Americans from having the same kind of health care other Western industrialized countries give their citizens — universal health care; in this case, an improved and expanded Medicare-for-All.

Instead, they want to perpetuate the current system which by all accounts, is failing to provide quality health care at affordable costs, with better outcomes.

And the tactic they are using is fear-mongering of the worse kind, saying that if we move towards a Medicare-for-All system, the people who like their employer-based health care, or the hospitals, insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies, etc., will lose what they have, hospitals will close, and companies go bankrupt; in other words, they will lose huge profits the current broken system generates for them.

As the following article from Healthcare Dive reports, the hospital lobby is opposing this movement towards a more equitable system of health care in this country all for the purpose of protecting their bottom lines.

Don’t let them scare you. Universal health care is a right, not a privilege. We are the only Western industrial nation without such a system. People before profits. Health care for all, not for the few.

Here is the article:

As more Democratic presidential hopefuls embrace the idea, health systems and providers have picked up lobbying efforts arguing it would shutter hospitals.

Source: Hospital lobby ramps up ‘Medicare for all’ opposition | Healthcare Dive

Beware Billionaires Against Medicare for All

This week, the former CEO of everyone’s favorite coffee house and time waster, Starbucks, declared that he was considering a run for president next year as an independent.

This announcement brought immediate response from both wings of the Democratic Party, as they said it would result in the re-election of the current occupant of the White House.

Even former NYC Mayor, Michael Bloomberg, another billionaire, said that he should not run.

However, as this is a blog about medical care, and not politics, I will leave the discussion as to the efficacy of an independent run for president by another billionaire for others.

What I do want to focus on is this overpaid former barista’s belief that the US cannot afford a Medicare for All, single-payer health care system.

Incidentally, this is also Bloomberg’s view as well.

But I do not think their opposition is based solely on the belief that Medicare for All, single-payer is too expensive. Rather, I believe they are afraid that after the results of last November’s midterm elections, the Democratic Party is poised to win back the White House and possibly the Senate, and that Medicare for All, in whatever form it takes, will be enacted.

I have written about the health care industry’s efforts to derail Medicare for All in previous posts. (See the following: https://wp.me/p2QJfz-QIyhttps://wp.me/p2QJfz-Jki, and https://wp.me/p2QJfz-WI5)

While I cannot accuse Schultz and Bloomberg of being in the pocket of the healthcare industry, it does look suspicious that now that the Democrats control the House, they are coming out against a health care plan that many Americans voted for when they voted for Democrats.

But billionaires should not be the ones deciding whether or not we enact Medicare for All. That should be up to the voters (patients and non-patients), their elected representatives, and most importantly, those in the medical profession who believe the time has come for Medicare for All, single-payer.

One such group are physicians themselves, as reported back in August in the magazine of the Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), which I was informed of this morning by a high school alumnus who posted the article on another alum’s Facebook post.

The article was originally posted in Jacobinmag.com.

Here is the link to the article by Meagan Day.

One caveat to progressives: Don’t assume that every American voter who is undecided, declared themselves as an independent, or are unhappy with their choice in the last presidential election, and his behavior and actions, will vote for your chosen candidate. That is why Schultz is contemplating running. And he can do a lot of damage to your plans for 2020.