Tag Archives: Medical Travel

Trends in Workers’ Compensation Claims: Some Things to Think About for Medical Travel

It is rare that I post articles from the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) on this blog, and it has been some time since I discussed workers’ comp and medical travel in the same post, so I thought that this would be a good time to do so.

NCCI is the premier source for data collection in the workers’ compensation industry. Their focus is more involved with the factors that drive the cost of workers’ comp insurance, rather than specific issues in workers’ comp that one might find from reading the reports of the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI).

As the article will note, there has been a decrease in frequency of claims, but an increase in severity. Claim frequency is defined by NCCI as the number of claims involving lost wage benefits paid, divided by earned premium. For those of you in the health care and medical travel worlds, just know that it means there are more claims reported to insurance carriers.

Claim severity, on the other hand, is defined as losses incurred, divided by the number of claims, for lost wage benefits paid. This will be of importance to the medical travel industry, as they have found a +16% increase in medical severity from 2011 to 2016.

I will let you read the rest of the article here.

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Medical Travel/Health Care Thought Leader Seeks Opportunities

 

Medical Travel/HealthCare Thought Leader and Blogger, seeks opportunities to speak, write, and collaborate on projects to bring about greater participation of patients to global medical travel facilities.

NOTE: I am not a physician, nor do I have patients or clients to refer to you. I am seeking persons already engaged in medical travel who want to expand into a new market. I offer my services in an administrative or managerial capacity.

Experience:

Over five and a half years experience creating, maintaining, and analyzing current issues in Medical Travel, Health Care, and other topics.

Over six years research into the Medical Travel industry.

Promoted the implementation of medical travel into Workers’ Compensation insurance industry.

Analyzed the cost of healthcare and the options of alternative treatments abroad.

Presented White Paper to Medical Travel conference in Mexico in Nov. 2014.

Extensive experience in Insurance and Claims Management, especially in medical-related claims (Workers’ Compensation).

Strong administrative and financial skills.

Education:

Master’s in Health Administration, 2011

Interested in working remotely, willing to travel, willing to write and speak at conferences, has valid US passport.

Resume can be found here.

Blog: richardkrasner.wordpress.com

Phone number: +1 561-603-1685 (mobile)

 

U.S. Near Bottom, Hong Kong and Singapore at Top of Health Havens – Bloomberg

Want medical care without quickly draining your fortune? Try Singapore or Hong Kong as your healthy havens.

Source: U.S. Near Bottom, Hong Kong and Singapore at Top of Health Havens – Bloomberg

Botched Beauty: The Dark Side of Medical Travel

Richard’s Note: The episode of The Doctors TV show mentioned below is not a complete episode. There are multiple videos on the website of the show. It will take some patience to watch them all. Sorry for the confusion.

While channel surfing, I came across the Fox program, The Doctors. They were investigating botched surgeries performed as part of a medical travel experience. One woman died as a result of an uncertified physician and facility; the other woman cannot have plastic surgery on her posterior again after a botched Brazilian butt lift.

The woman who died was the aunt of one of the audience members.

Here is the video of the episode that aired today. I suggest the industry leaders watch this.

https://www.thedoctorstv.com/episodes/doctors-investigate-botched-beauty-across-border-can-you-buy-better-body-another-country

All parties responsible for medical travel must do a better job of policing and cleaning up the industry. This cannot keep happening without anyone doing anything about it. That is why it is not seeing an increase in patients going overseas. It’s your fault, so take responsibility. CLEAN UP YOUR ACT.

Growing General Surgeon Shortage

On the heels of my recent post, Free Medical School Tuition Could Solve Physician Shortage, comes a new article about the shortage of general surgeons.

Friday, Reuters Health reported about a new study in the US that projected that the shortage of general surgeons in the US will get worse as the number of doctors entering the workforce fails to keep pace with population growth.

The study’s researchers predicted shortages based on their estimates of population growth by 2050, and by the number of medical schools and hospital-sponsored general surgery trainee positions.

  • By 2050, there will be a deficit of 7,047 general surgeons nationwide
  • That is higher than the shortage of 6,000 they predicted a decade ago based on the pace of population growth and new surgeons entering the job market at that time.

The lead study author, Dr. E. Christopher Ellison of Ohio State University, was quoted as saying, “Leaders in surgery have predicted a pending shortage in the general surgery workforce for more than 10 years.”

Dr. Ellison also said that, “the impact of the general surgeon shortages on patients is measured in the timeliness of care and the consequences of delays in care.”

The study was published in the journal Surgery, and the researchers noted that there should be about 7.5 general surgeons for every 100,000 people, to maintain acceptable access to surgical care.

According to the study, the number of general surgery resident positions and the number of residents completing their training has been rising in the US, but these increases have been insufficient to maintain the ideal number of surgeons for the population.

The authors stated, that if anything, the projected shortage is an underestimate.

Dr. Ellison: “We have not considered the impact of the aging population on the surgeon’s workload…Patients 65 years and older are more likely to need general surgery services, and as that segment of the population increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the demands for general surgeons.”

Ellison also added, that because most general surgeons practice in metropolitan areas, the impact of the shortage will be more keenly felt by rural communities.

The researchers assumed, in calculating the projected shortage, that some young trainees would choose subspecialties like vascular or transplant surgery, instead of general surgery. They assumed, also, that general surgeons would work for 30 years before retiring.

Two possibilities can be reached from the findings of the study: one, it is possible that the researchers have over- or under-estimated how many general surgeons will enter the profession each year and how many years they will remain on the job; and two, it is also possible that population growth estimates might change again, altering the shortage projections.

Dr. Anupam Jena, a Harvard Medical School researcher and a physician at Massachusetts General Hospital said the following: “Because there are fixed high costs to developing a general surgical practice in a more remotely populated area, we observe fewer practices in these areas. I wouldn’t call this a shortage per se, but I do think it’s a problem that as a society we need to figure out solutions to.”

Dr. Jena was not part of the study. Two solutions offered by Dr. Jena, however, were identifying ways for rural patients who need surgical care to be promptly evaluated and treated at medical centers several hours away, or it might involve encouraging graduates of both American and foreign medical training programs to work in remote parts of the country.

I’ve discussed the projected shortage of physicians in the past, but this is the first time, a specific specialty of physicians has been studied for a projected shortage specifically. And as in the past, I have suggested that medical travel could alleviate the shortage, especially in workers’ compensation.

Either we follow the suggestions of Dr. Jena and others, or we consider looking abroad for the solution to a growing problem — a shortage of general surgeons.

 

Am. Chamber of Commerce Seals Medical Travel Collaboration Agreement

An article from a recent connection of mine.

The Medical Travel collaboration agreement puts AMCHAMDR membership available to connect service opportunities and solutions to medical travelers.

Source: Am. Chamber of Commerce Seals Medical Travel Collaboration Agreement

Major Surgery Wait Times for Workers’ Comp: Can Medical Travel Assist?

Last week, the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) released their FlashReport — Time from Injury to Medical Treatment: How States Compare, and I requested a copy.

While the report is rather lengthy, covering slightly more than fifty pages, I decided to focus on one aspect of the report that related to the length of time from injury to medical treatment with major surgery.

The report examined the time from injury to treatment in 18 states, and each of the services studied were ranked by median number of days from injury to medical service for each service. The report looked at claims from 2015/2016 with more than seven days lost time.

I wanted to make the medical travel industry aware that major surgery under workers’ compensation was not something that happened immediately after an on-the-job injury, and to alert the industry to figure out how they can improve the wait times for such surgeries.

Here is the summary of key findings from the report:

  • Considerable variation across states in the time from injury to first treatment for physical medicine and “specialty” services such as major radiology and pain management injections across injury types.
  • Patterns in time to first medical treatment were fairly consistent for some states; that is, some states tended to show shorter or longer time to first treatment across injuries and services.
  • Little variation in time to first medical treatment for “entry” services (such as emergency, office visits, and minor radiology) for most injury types.
  • Initial medical treatment was slightly faster for objective injuries (like fractures) than for subjective injuries (like sprains and strains).
  • Timing of medical services varies by type of injury, likely a reflection of different treatment patterns.

Based on the analytical approach WCRI used for other services, they identified Indiana, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wisconsin as having a shorter median number of days to the first major surgery.

California, Georgia, Iowa, North Carolina, and Texas had the longest median number of days to first major surgery and was based on the number of days average in rank order. Arkansas and Louisiana were excluded due to small cell size.

Major surgery was ranked third by type of non-entry service by maximum number of days from injury to first medical service: 118 days. Major surgery was ranked sixth by percentage of claims receiving medical services by maximum number of days at: 36.5%. Indiana had that distinction.

Major surgery was defined by WCRI as including invasive surgical procedures, as opposed to surgical treatments and pain management injections. The most frequent surgeries in this service group include, but are not limited to, arthroscopic surgeries of the shoulder or knee, laminectomies, laminotomies, discectomies, carpel tunnel surgeries, neuroplasty, and hernia repair.

Five types of injuries had the maximum medium number of days from injury to first major surgery: Neurologic spine pain, Inflammations, Upper extremity neurologic, Other sprains and strains, and Knee derangements.

The table below illustrates the maximum for each injury with the corresponding minimum, in order of maximum number of days.

Type of Injury

Maximum

Minimum

State

Neurologic spine pain

187

105

CA

Inflammations

173

96

CA

Upper extremity neurologic

169

85

CA

Other sprains and strains

140

69

CA

Knee derangements

133

52

CA

What does this mean?

This report is by no means conclusive as it relates to length of time for major surgery in the other states that were not analyzed. Yet, it is instructive to both the workers’ comp industry and the medical travel industry that given predicted shortages of both physicians and nurses, it would be prudent to explore other avenues so that the maximum wait times can be lowered, which would enable the injured employee to return to work faster.

Not doing so will be more expensive in the long run and will be detrimental to the well-being of the patient.

To purchase a copy of the report, click here.