Tag Archives: Medical Travel

Health Care Top US Employer and What It Means for Medical Travel

Back to the real world of health care, et. al.

Last week, The Atlantic magazine reported that the US health care industry has supplanted manufacturing and retail to become the largest source of jobs in the US.

The article, by Derek Thompson, reports that for the first time in history, in the last quarter, there are now more jobs in health care than in the two industries that were the leading job engines of the 20th century.

According to Thompson, in 2000, there were 7 million more workers in manufacturing than in health care, and at the beginning of the Great Recession, there were 2.4 million more workers in retail than in health care.

Thompson says that there are three main drivers of the boom in health care jobs.

  • First, Americans as a group are getting older. By 2025, one-quarter of the workforce will be older than 55 (your humble blogger). This will have doubled in just 30 years. It will have a profound economic and political impact, such as declining productivity and electoral showdowns between a young, diverse workforce and an older, whiter retirement bloc. [True in the last election.] The most obvious effect of an aging population will be that it needs more care, and more workers to care for them.
  • Second, health care is publicly subsidized. The US spends hundreds of billions of dollars on Medicare, Medicaid, and benefits for government employees and veterans. [The recent tax bill passed will make substantial cuts to many of these programs, or outright privatize them.] The US also subsidizes private insurance through tax breaks for employers who sponsor health care.
  • Third, two of the most destabilizing forces for labor in the last generation have been globalization and automation. They have hurt manufacturing and retail by offshoring factories, replacing human arms with robotic limbs, and dooming fusty department stores. Health care is resistant to both. While globalization has revolutionized supply chains and created a global market for manufacturing labor, most health care is local. A Connecticut dentist isn’t selling her services to Portugal, and a physician’s receptionist in Lisbon isn’t directing her patient to Stamford. [I take exception here, as many of you will too. It seems Mr. Thompson has not heard of Medical Travel, both inbound and outbound, and therein lies your problem.]

Finally, the growth in health care employment is more located in administrative jobs than in physician jobs. The number of non-physicians has exploded in the last two decades. Most of these jobs are administrative such as receptionists and office clerks. It is not clear that these workers improve outcomes for patients.

Robert Kocher, a senior fellow at the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics at USC said the following, “Despite all this additional labor, the most meaningful difference in quality over the past 10 years is the recent reduction in 30-day hospital readmissions from an average of 19 percent to 17.8 percent.”

One other point Thompson notes, is that categories like retail and health care are imperfect approximations, and that some categories are too restrictive, and some are too broad. He points out that there are more jobs in leisure and hospitality than in health care. [Which would explain why some in Medical Travel are more like travel agents, than medical professionals.]

So, while there is good news about the position of health care employment in the US, the downside is, at least as far as Medical Travel is concerned, that globalization may not have as much of an impact on health care as I, and others have thought, and that portends bad news for the industry.

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S**thole Countries and Medical Travel

The comment yesterday that the current occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue said, is not only revolting, disgusting, sick and racist. It is also a threat to the national security of the United States, and to the economic health of the nation, and of the medical travel industry.

A host on the Fox News network defended what was said Thursday by saying that this is how forgotten men and women talk. If by “forgotten men and women” he means the men and women who lost their jobs because their wealthy bosses sent their jobs overseas or they were lost due to automation, then they only have to blame themselves for voting against their economic interests, and not the immigrants they blame for losing their jobs.

As to what this means for medical travel, think carefully about who travels from the US to other countries like India, Thailand, Singapore, Costa Rica, Mexico, and others, and not to mention those countries he did mention as “s**tholes”, especially in Africa, the Caribbean, and the Middle East (a region he did not mention yesterday, but has singled out for a Muslim ban).

And consider also what this means for inbound medical travel from those continents and countries that American hospitals might want to attract. Would you, as a citizen of those countries, travel to the US if that was what the leader of the US thought about you and your country? I don’t think so.

The notion that we should take in people from Norway (not that there is anything wrong with Norwegians, in fact, I am watching a series on early Norwegian history, Vikings on the cable channel History) is proof that he is a racist and a white supremacist.

Comments on social media have even gone so far as to indicate that Norwegians would never consider moving to the US because they have a better standard of living and have free education, health care, and rank higher on all social metrics.

So, those of you in the medical travel industry should be aware that some of the resistance to medical travel from America, and from the very people who would benefit greatly from it, are the forgotten men and women the Fox host mentioned. If so, it will be a tough sell to get them over there.

CMS Greenlights Outpatient Total Knee Replacement: What it Could Mean for Medical Travel

According to an article in MedCityNews.com, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) removed total knee arthroplasty (TKA) from the Inpatient-only list in November.

This will effectively allow eligible Medicare patients to have the surgery in outpatient departments of local hospitals beginning this month.

The article also mentioned that CMS did not add TKA’s to its list of payable procedures at ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs).

This will give hospitals an important head start on a growing outpatient competitor lobbying hard for the agency’s blessing, the article stated.

CMS will continue to review ASCs safety and feasibility of total joint replacement, which is a signal that change is coming. If it does so, it will pose a threat to hospital revenue.

What this may mean for medical travel is that if the cost savings are significant from allowing outpatient, and eventually ASC total knee replacement, then outbound medical travel facilities catering to such clients will see a drop in patients choosing to go abroad for such surgeries.

To that end, the industry must monitor CMS’ position on ASCs and knee replacement, as well as determine if domestic hospitals are drawing away customers because the procedure can be done on an outpatient basis.

Is “Bleisure” Travel the New Trend in Medical Travel?

As someone who never rejects good writing from fellow bloggers, here is an article from Elizabeth Ziemba, who I met three years ago in Reynosa, Mexico regarding a new trend in Medical Travel called, “Bleisure” Travel.

“Bleisure” travel is the combining of business travel with medical travel for short-term medical and dental procedures.

Rather than paraphrase Elizabeth’s article, I will post the link to it from LinkedIn here.

We’ve Got to Stop Meeting Like This

This morning I received a notice of the upcoming IMTJ Summit next month in Athens, Greece. Last month, it was the Temos conference in Dusseldorf. And just after that one, one connection of mine traveled to China as an invited guest. I’d never heard of Temos before last month.

It seems that every month, year after year, there are conferences, summits, congresses, etc. all over the world, either on a global, regional, or national level.

I noticed these conferences are advertised in some of the online newsletters and print publications from the industry. Yet, when I started this blog, three newsletters, one in Singapore, one in Malaysia, and one in the US, closed within a year or so of them picking up my earliest posts on Medical Travel.

It is impossible, of course, for anyone to attend these conferences at the same time, so it must be very small crowds that attend, or a very privileged few who do.

A member of my family likes to attend every wedding, and that is not always possible. However, being invited would be nice occasionally.

This is not the first time I have spoken about the number of conferences in the Medical Travel industry, an industry, I think you will agree, that is not very big, and despite inflated numbers to the contrary, has not had the growth many would like to see.

I specifically titled this post, We’ve Got to Stop Meeting Like This, facetiously because I have only attended three conferences and have met only a handful of individuals. The rest I have connected with online, and really do not know, nor do they know me. I’m not so bad once you meet me.

I still get notices about the Mexican conference promoted by Carlos Arceo, even though he no longer invites non-facilitators and non-experts to his show. I haven’t even seen anything about the Costa Rican conference since I attended the one in 2014.

I wonder how much better this industry would look to the outside world if more non-facilitators, more passionate individuals such as myself and others would be invited to attend and present the industry in a more favorable light to the rest of the world.

Such conferences should not be private clubs or reserved for those with flexible schedules to jet all over the world, even if they are not speaking, and only showing their face.

Perhaps you can forgo for a time scheduling so many conflicting and coterminous conferences, and concentrate on making one great industry-wide conference to better organize the industry and to set standards and good practices for all participants in the industry.

Maybe then when we do meet at some of these conferences, we can joke that we really should stop meeting like this.

What do you think?

Cross-Border Medical Travel in Tucson

Happy Holidays to all!

Hope you all had a good holiday.

Here is an article from Fierce Healthcare.com that describes what actions the city of Tucson, Arizona is taking to become a medical travel destination.

Readers of this blog will recall a few past posts that discussed cross-border medical travel, albeit due to an on-the-job injury. The article, NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View, discussed a Workers’ Comp claim in Arizona when a Mexican truck driver was thrown from his cab, received medical care first in Mexico, then in Arizona, as the state had changed their laws, and he was able to file a second claim.

A follow-up article, NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View: Update, reported the continued status of the driver’s claim.

Several other posts discussed cross-border medical travel into California, and into Mexico.

Here is the article in its entirety:

 

Tucson aims to become medical tourism mecca
by Ilene MacDonald | Apr 10, 2017 11:36pm
Tucson, Arizona, is on a mission to become a healthcare and wellness destination for international visitors, particularly Mexican families with enough disposable income to pay for medical care in the United States.

The Tucson Health Association—which includes Banner Health, the Carondelet Health Network, Northwest Medical Center and Tucson Medical Center—hopes to entice tourists to come to the city for elective, nonemergency services, such as total knee replacements, the Arizona Daily Star reports.

Although some Mexican insurers will pay for certain procedures in the U.S., Felipe Garcia, executive vice president of Visit Tucson, which is also a member of the association, expects most visitors will likely pay out-of-pocket for the procedures.

“If your patient needs a certain procedure we have in the U.S., we’ll take care of it in Tucson, do the surgery and then we’ll send the patient back to Mexico where the provider there can take the next step with recovery,” Garcia said.

Tucson hospitals are hoping their efforts will be as successful as Texas Medical Center in Houston, a group of nonprofit health providers that includes MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Texas Children’s Hospital. Those provider attract 15,000 medical tourists a year, according to the article.

Medical tourism has become a lucrative business, for both healthcare providers and the local community, as visitors usually have extended stays in hotels and leased apartments, according to the article. Josef Woodman, CEO of the North Carolina-based Patients Beyond Borders, told the publication that approximately 250,000 medical tourists come to the U.S. for treatment each year and spend as much as $40,000 per patient.

To attract Mexican patients, Visit Tucson intends to develop a website in Spanish and hire a concierge to help patients connect with medical care in Tucson and navigate the healthcare system. It plans to market heavily to those who live in the Northern Mexico area due to geographical proximity. Eventually the association plans to market medical services to Canadian citizens.

 

Here is the link: https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/tucson-aims-to-become-medical-tourism-mecca-for-mexican-patients