Tag Archives: Medicaid

Appeals Court Rejects Medicaid Work Requirements

Since 2018, the Trump regime has been attempting to allow Arkansas to impose work requirements for Medicaid recipients.

In previous posts, Arkansas Medicaid Work Requirement Failing Out of the Gate, Nation’s First Medicaid Work Requirement Sheds Thousands From Rolls In ArkansasArkansas drops 3,815 more Medicaid enrollees over work requirement – Modern HealthcareMedicaid Work Requirements in the Courts, and Medicaid Work Requirements Are Detrimental, we have seen how the regime in Washington is attempting to re-write the rules on who gets Medicaid assistance in an attempt to begin the process of doing away with Medicaid altogether, which is a long-standing GOP goal.

Today’s Wall Street Journal reports that a federal appeals court ruled the Trump administration acted unlawfully when it allowed the state of Arkansas to impose requirements that some lower-income residents work or seek job training as a condition of receiving Medicaid health coverage.

According to the article, the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, ruled that the Department of Health and Human Services acted in an arbitrary and capricious manner in approving Arkansas’s plan.

Hey Medicaid – Why So Skimpy on Dental Care?

I finally went to see a local dentist group yesterday and when they handed me the proposed treatment plan, I was shocked to see that Medicaid was only going to pay $154 of the $884 the dentist was going to charge. The rest, $730, was to be my responsibility. So much for having insurance.

My current plan is one of three plans accepted here in Florida by the state. The young lady in the dentist’s office who check me out said that they were not their favorite plan, and that perhaps I could still change to another plan.

I then called the Florida Department of Children and Families (DCF), but they were closed due to the holiday yesterday. This morning, I called the plan, and was told that they only received the treatment plan today, and that it was being reviewed and that I would hear back in seven to ten days.

In the meantime, I contacted one of my LinkedIn contacts who does medical travel for dental care to Costa Rica, and she will be getting in touch with a dentist down there to compare costs between what they charge in CR, and what the dentist here is proposing.

But the real reason for writing this post today is because Medicaid in Florida limits what services they will cover, and focuses more on the dental care of children, rather than giving adults the same or equal care, relative to their age and medical condition.

For example, Medicaid covers such services for children as: Ambulatory Surgical Center of Hospital-based Dental Services, Dental Exams, Dental Screenings, Dental X-rays, Dentures or Partials, Extractions, Fillings and Crowns, Fluoride, Oral Health Instructions, Orthodontics (Braces), Periodontics, Root Canals, Sealants, Sedation, Space Maintainers, and Teeth Cleanings.

For patients over 21, this is what the all the plans cover: Dental Exams (limited), Dental X-rays (limited), Dentures, Extractions, Pain Management, Problem Focused Exam, Sedation.

There are Extended benefits for patients over 21, and include the following with prior approval from the plan: Additional dental exams, Additional dental x-rays, Additional extractions, Dental screenings, Fillings (silver and white), Fluoride, Oral Health Instructions, Sealants, and Teeth cleanings (basic and deep).

We all know that adult dental care is more comprehensive and more expensive than that of children, yet, there are services missing from the adult plans that should be covered, such as Crowns, Root Canals, Bridges, and yes, even implants. Dentures are so last century.

Fortunately for me, the two teeth that will be extracted are next to each other and are in the back of my mouth, so you can’t see them. But what if they were two front teeth, as the song goes during Christmas? Does Medicaid tell the patient, “Sorry, now you can whistle through the space in your teeth?”

When are we going to catch up with the rest of the Western world and provide all of our citizens with a complete range of services for dental, vision, and medical care that does not cost an arm and a leg? When will we take the profiteering out of health care like other countries do? We need to stop nickle and diming the American people when it comes to our health. We need Medicare for All, not Medicaid  that does not provide enough services.

The Trump Administration Cracked Down on Medicaid. Kids Lost Insurance. — ProPublica

In case you think Medicare for All is a pipe dream, here is an article from ProPublica that reports that even children are vulnerable to losing their medical coverage when they need critical surgery and other life-saving treatments.

If you don’t care if adult Americans cannot get adequate medical care, then perhaps you should care that children do. After all, it could be your kid who needs it. Would you really sacrifice your kids to the almighty dollar and profit?

One salient point to mention, the Petersen’s are from northern Idaho. Idaho is a Red state and voted for Trump. While there is no way to tell if Mrs. Petersen voted for Trump, it can be assumed that she probably did. So much for making America great again. Your kid dies because the President hates Medicaid.

Here is the article link:

Weeks before 4-year-old Paul Petersen’s surgery to close a hole in his stomach, he lost coverage. The administration’s latest enforcement of the Affordable Care Act burdened many Idaho Medicaid recipients, as a million kids nationwide lost coverage.

Source: The Trump Administration Cracked Down on Medicaid. Kids Lost Insurance. — ProPublica

No Socialists Here

Dear Insurance company execs, pharmaceutical company execs, employee benefits consultants and executives, Wall Street investors, and all other stakeholders in the current dysfunctional, broken, complex, complicated, and bloated mess called the US health care system.

You have heard many politicians, and journalists, not to mention your own peers, or even you yourselves label the push for Medicare for All as “Socialism.”

We even have the Administrator of CMS, Seema Verma, calling it, and the public option plan,  “radical and dangerous for the country” recently when she spoke to the Better Medicare Alliance’s Medicare Advantage Summit in Washington, D.C.

Her solution, and probably yours as well, is to keep selling Medicare Advantage plans, which only makes the current system worse.

So, to help you get over your fear and loathing of Socialism, and to prove to you that the only reason why the US is the only Western, industrial nation to not provide its citizens with universal health care is because you are making money off of other people’s health, or lack thereof.

You are doing so, because you are greedy. There I said it. Now I hope you will pay attention to the following graphic:

Do you see any socialist countries? Do you see any radical and dangerous regimes that are hostile to the interests of the US? Well, maybe Slovenia. After all, they did send us Melania and her illegal family.

But back to the case at hand. I defy any of you hotshots in the health care space to prove to me that all of these Capitalist, free-market countries are flaming Reds, or even a bit Pinko.

You can’t, because it is not true. You and those who call Medicare for All, Single Payer, or even the so-called “public option” radical, just don’t want the government to interfere with your looting the pockets of the American people for your financial gain.

And that is why we are the only country with an “X”, instead of a check mark below our name.

16,000 Unnecessary Deaths Tied to Failure to Expand Medicaid

The Los Angeles Times reported Monday that a new study found that Medicaid expansion brought appreciable improvements in health to enrollees, but also that full expansion nationwide would have averted 15,600 deaths among the vulnerable Medicaid-eligible population.

This is in contrast to the view of opponents of Medicaid expansion who have said that lack of evidence that enrollment in Medicaid improves health and saves lives, and therefore they believed that expansion was a waste of money.

In the 22 mostly red states that refused expansion, the cause of the 15,600 deaths of their state’s residents was attributed to failure to expand.

“This highlights an ongoing cost to non-adoption that should be relevant to both state policymakers and their constituents,” the authors of the study said.

Fourteen states are still holding out, States such as Wyoming and South Dakota, the article states, have a warped sense of “freedom.” States such as Maine and Louisiana, who have had a change in governors from Republican to Democrat, have recently adopted expansion.

medicaid

Fourteen states still resist Medicaid expansion, at great cost to their residents (Kaiser Family Foundation)

The article takes a dim view of the entire rationale for refusing to expand Medicaid, and cites a few noted Conservative voices against the entire idea of expansion and Medicaid itself.

Conservatives have worked hard to depict Medicaid as ineffective, the article reports. They’ve done so, it continues,  by overinterpreting limited studies such as a 2013 study of a Medicaid expansion in Oregon.

Critics focused on the researchers’ finding of “no significant improvements in measured physical health outcomes in the first 2 years” of expansion, but they overlooked the findings that the expansion did “increase use of healthcare services, raise rates of diabetes detection and management, lower rates of depression, and reduce financial strain.”

Conservative health policy Avik Roy has crowed, the article states, that the result “calls into question the $450 billion a year we spend on Medicaid, and the fact that Obamacare throws 11 million more Americans into this broken program.”

Another right-wing critic of Medicaid expansion, and not to mention, also of Medicare for All, and now more recently, the public option for Medicare, is CMS Administrator Seema Verma, a Trump flunky.

(Credit: Getty Images )  Picture worth a thousand words was never more true. What a piece of work!

Verma has argued that the expansion hasn’t been a success despite its enrollment figures and has been a leader in undermining the program by allowing states to impose premiums, work requirements and punitive disenrollments on patients. (Her efforts have been blocked by a federal judge, for now.)

This is why advocates for Medicare for All are so passionate and determined, in the face of even the slightest opposition to improving the health and lives of millions of Americans for small changes to our nation’s health care system.

Failure to expand Medicaid, failure to enact universal health care, even if it is a public option, is challenged from the right for morally indefensible and reprehensible reasons.

The cry of “freedom” from conservatives is a smoke-screen to hid their true purpose. To dismantle all social programs and funnel that money to the wealthy and corporations, as they have already done with the Trump tax giveaway.

Now they are trying to cut three million Americans off of food stamps.

All these schemes have one purpose in mind, to kill off their most ardent supporters in Southern and Midwestern states that continue to vote for these sociopaths. To them, freedom means, freedom for a company to profit off of your misfortune, whether that misfortune is due to poor diet, poor personal habits such as smoking and drug abuse, and poor health outcomes due to poverty and economic distress.

Naturally, any attempt to improve the health and lives of the poor, black or white, or Latino, etc., is viewed as “Socialism” and is deemed bad for the country, as Ms. Verma did this week to the Better Medicare Alliance’s Medicare Advantage Summit in Washington, D.C.

No, it’s not bad for the country. It’s bad for the profits of the insurance companies, the pharmaceutical companies, the benefit managers industry, the health care consultants, and Wall Street investors.

Wanting to cut of food stamps, fail to expand even Medicaid, tightening rules for who is eligible for these programs, is not only bad for the health of average Americans, it is bad for the economic vitality of the nation in an era of global competition.

The men and women at Trump rallies are angry, but they are angry at the wrong people. The clown on the stage is the person they really should be angry at, and his entire swamp of “the best people.”

Medicaid Work Requirements Are Detrimental

Previous posts in this blog about Medicaid work requirements, especially in the State of Arkansas, suggested that they would be harmful to recipients of Medicaid benefits. Arkansas was the first state to implement work requirements last June.

In an exhaustive article out today from the New England Journal of Medicine, the authors found that requiring Medicaid beneficiaries to work had a detrimental effect on health insurance coverage in the initial 6 months of the policy but no significant change in employment.

Lack of awareness and confusion, the report states, about the reporting requirements were common, which may explain why thousands of persons lost coverage even though more than 95% of the target population appeared to meet the requirements or qualified for an exemption.

The conclusion of the report found that in its first 6 months, work requirements in Arkansas were associated with a significant loss of Medicaid coverage and rise in the percentage of uninsured persons.

The authors found no significant changes in employment associated with the policy, and more than 95% of persons who were targeted by the policy already met the requirement or should have been exempt.

Since the article is quite long, I have summarized the results here, but the full report can be found by clicking here.

It would appear that the goal of forcing Medicaid beneficiaries to go back to work has more downsides than upsides, but since this is being implemented by a group of puritanical, work-obsessed, economic libertarian politicians, reality has overcome their ideological disgust at giving people social benefits without expecting something in return — namely requiring low-income people to find a job in order to be covered for health care.

Isn’t it time we leave the 17th century and its puritan ethics behind and provide every American, rich or poor, with universal health care, with no strings attached? After all, that is what every other Western democracy does.

Voters Tuning Out of Health Care Debates

Axios reported yesterday that American voters are tuning out of the health care debates dominating Washington, the presidential campaign, and the politically active talking about Medicare for All and other proposals, according to an article by Drew Altman.

Axios conducted six focus groups in three states, Texas, Florida and Pennsylvania. It was facilitated by the Kaiser Family Foundation’s director of Polling and Survey Research. The focus groups consisted of independent, Republican, and Democratic voters in several swing states and districts.

They were only aware of candidates’ and elected officials’ proposals on health care, but they did not see them as relevant to their struggles to pay medical bills or navigating the health care system.

Each of the six focus groups had between 8 and 10 people who are regular voters and said that health care will be an important issue for them in the 2020 election for President.

Here are the takeaways from the focus groups:

  • These voters are not tuned into the details — or even the broad outlines — of the health policy debates going on in Washington and the campaign, even though they say health care will be at least somewhat important to their vote.
  • Many had never heard the term “Medicare for all,” and very few had heard about Medicare or Medicaid buy-in proposals, or Medicaid and Affordable Care Act state block grant plans like the one included in President Trump’s proposed budget.
  • When asked what they knew about Medicare for all, few offered any description beyond “everyone gets Medicare,” and almost no one associated the term with a single-payer system or national health plan.
  • When asked about ACA repeal, participants almost universally felt that Republicans did not have a plan to replace the law.
  • When voters in the groups were read even basic descriptions of some proposals to expand government coverage, many thought they sounded complicated and like a lot of red tape.
  • They also worried about how such plans might strain the current system and threaten their own ability to keep seeing providers they like and trust.

Most of the voters in these groups did not see any of the current proposals from either side of the aisle as solutions to their top problems: namely paying for care or navigating the insurance system and red tape.

The debates on health care have gotten too far into the weeds and are too complex and complicated for the average voter to understand, let alone follow at this early stage of the presidential campaign.

The debate will become more meaningful, the article contends, when they see stark differences between the health plan of the Democratic nominee and Trump. This way, they will be able to focus more on what those differences mean for themselves and the country.

Here is the comment posted in response by Don McCanne:

Although we should be cautious about trying to draw Great Truths from half a dozen focus groups, we should be concerned about what these groups revealed about their understanding of the basis of the problems that they experience with our health care system.

They see problems with navigating the health care system and with paying their medical bills. But when offered solutions for these problems they show little understanding of even basic health policy, and they seem to be influenced more by political memes expressing a distrust of government, complexity of public solutions, and government interference with their interactions with the health care system.

A particularly important example of this is, “When asked what they knew about Medicare for all… almost no one associated the term with a single-payer system or national health plan.”

This lack of sophistication leaves them unaware that the government Medicare program is far more deserving of our trust than the private insurers (“surprise medical bills” anyone?), that a government program that includes everyone though a publicly funded universal risk pool is far less complex than a multitude of private insurers with various complex rules for accessing and paying for care, and that a single payer system interferes less since the patient has free choices in health care whereas the private plans are more restrictive of benefits while limiting coverage to their contracted provider lists (a minute fraction of the physicians and hospitals available throughout the nation).

Health policy is complicated, but the message for single payer Medicare for All need not be: enrollment for life, free choice of physicians and hospitals and other health care professionals and institutions, and automatic payment by our own public program. The focus groups already understand that the Republicans do not have a replacement plan, but what they do not understand is that only the single payer model of Medicare for All meets these goals whereas the ACA/public option Medicare for Some often leaves them exposed to the access and affordability issues they already face.

Again, single payer Medicare for All means:

  • Never have to change insurers
  • Free choice always of doctors and hospitals
  • No medical bills since care has been prepaid through our taxes.

None of these are features of either the Republican proposals or the Democratic ACA/public option proposals. It’s a simple message. Let’s do our best to see that the American voter understands it.