Tag Archives: long-term care

Immigrant Labor to Impact Care for America’s Elderly and Disabled

For all of those who support the efforts of the current fascist regime to stem the tide of immigration into this country, the following abstract and article from Health Affairs  from Zalman, Finnegan, Himmelstein, Touw, and Woolhandler, suggests that such policies will be detrimental to the care elderly and disabled Americans will receive in the future.

It is another example of the racist, wrong-headed, and neanderthal thinking on the right that will hurt millions of Americans who otherwise will not be able to care for their personal needs as they age, or should suffer a life-altering disability.

ABSTRACT As the US wrestles with immigration policy and caring for an
aging population, data on immigrants’ role as health care and long-term
care workers can inform both debates. Previous studies have examined
immigrants’ role as health care and direct care workers (nursing, home
health, and personal care aides) but not that of immigrants hired by
private households or nonmedical facilities such as senior housing to
assist elderly and disabled people or unauthorized immigrants’ role in
providing these services. Using nationally representative data, we found
that in 2017 immigrants accounted for 18.2 percent of health care
workers and 23.5 percent of formal and nonformal long-term care sector
workers. More than one-quarter (27.5 percent) of direct care workers and
30.3 percent of nursing home housekeeping and maintenance workers
were immigrants. Although legal noncitizen immigrants accounted for
5.2 percent of the US population, they made up 9.0 percent of direct care
workers. Naturalized citizens, 6.8 percent of the US population,
accounted for 13.9 percent of direct care workers. In light of the current
and projected shortage of health care and direct care workers, our
finding that immigrants fill a disproportionate share of such jobs
suggests that policies curtailing immigration will likely compromise the
availability of care for elderly and disabled Americans.

According to the article, the Institute of Medicine projects that 3.5 million additional health care
workers will be needed by 2030.

Currently, the authors state, immigrants fill health care workforce shortages, providing disproportionate amounts of care overall and particularly for key shortage roles such as rural physicians.

In addition, they report, Immigrant health care workers are, on average, more educated than US-born workers, and they often work at lower professional levels in the US because of lack of certification or licensure.

Finally, they work nontraditional shifts that are hard to fill (such as nights and weekends),6 and they bring linguistic and cultural diversity to address the needs of patients of varied ethnic backgrounds.

Along with the role immigrants play in the health care space, the size of the elderly population is expected to double by 2050, raising concern that long-term care workers will be in particularly short supply, according to the article.

Direct care workers—nursing, psychiatric, home health, and personal care aides—are
the primary providers of paid hands-on care for more than thirteen million elderly and disabled
Americans, the authors contend, and these workers help elderly and disabled people live at home, which is the preferred setting for most people, by providing assistance
with daily tasks such as bathing, dressing, and eating.

They also help elderly and disabled people in nursing or psychiatric facilities when living at home is not possible and during transitions home after hospitalization.

These workers are already in short supply, and the authors state that the Health Resources and Services Administration projects a 34 percent rise in the demand for direct care workers over
the next decade, equivalent to a need for 650,000 additional workers.

The projected shortages are compounded by high turnover and retention challenges, creating ongoing challenges to maintain a sufficient labor supply for-long-term care.

The rest of the article is divided into three main sections: Study Data & Methods, Study Results, and Discussion. Throughout the article are exhibits, and each section is further broken down into sub-sections.

The authors have done a serious effort to examine the impact current immigration policies will have on the future health care of the American people, but knowing this regime and their base of xenophobic, racist, paranoiac extremists, the American people will be the ones who will suffer, and many of them are the very people agreeing with these policies.