Tag Archives: Insurance

Surveys Say Health Care More Expensive for US Workers

A post on LinkedIn by Jaimy Lee, Health Care Editor at LinkedIn, reported Thursday that a pair of surveys indicated that health care is getting more expensive for many workers in the US.

Ms. Lee states that,

“Of the roughly 50% of Americans who get their health insurance from their employer, the cost of the average single premium rose 3% and the average family premium jumped 5% from 2017 to 2018, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. That means premium rate increases are rising faster than inflation, which rose 2.5% during the same period.”

In addition, the Kaiser survey reported that:

  • The average annual premium last year for one person was $6,896 and $19,616 for a family in 2018. (Workers have to pay for, on average, between 18% and 29% of their premium.)
  • The average deductible amount for single coverage in 2018 was $1,573. That’s similar to 2017.

And that a separate survey stated that, 45% of Americans between the ages of 19 and 64 years old were underinsured — meaning they have health insurance but their out-of-pocket costs exceed at least 10% of their household income — in 2018. [Emphasis added]

And, in a blow to those who would like to keep the current employer-based system and not move towards an improved and expanded Medicare-for-All system, a growing number of the underinsured are people who get their health benefits through their employers. That’s up 20% over the last four years. (Traditionally the underinsured are adults who buy insurance on the individual market.)

Ms. Lee closes her post on employer-based health care underinsured workers with the following from Vox:

“In a great historical irony, the evident faults of employer-sponsored insurance are helping fuel a new appetite for Medicare-for-all, a single-payer system where everybody gets health coverage from the government,” writes journalist Dylan Scott. “Shifting 160 million people from the coverage they currently get through their jobs to a new government plan is a lot of disruption — and disruption, especially in health care, has historically made a lot of Americans nervous.”

They may be nervous at first, but it would be much better to be fully insured and nervous for a short time, than to be uninsured and nervous worrying about how they will afford ever increasing costs of insurance.

Medicare-for-All is the only way to provide such piece of mind.

This election is about your pre-existing medical condition – Managed Care Matters

Fellow blogger, Joe Paduda, summed up what is at stake for millions of Americans, your humble blogger included, if the GOP holds onto the House and Senate after the Midterm election thirteen days from today.

At the bottom of Joe’s post is a link to a Blue Cross/Blue Shield website. Scroll down to the part labeled “Medical Condition Rejection List.” It covers every conceivable illness and condition that human beings may suffer from, and included on that list is peritoneal dialysis, which I am undergoing, and hemodialysis also.

If the Republicans get their way, the only people who will have health insurance are perfect specimens, and we all know that there is no such thing as a perfectly healthy human being. We are all born with, or have the potential to get, some form of illness or disease at some time in our lives. It’s in our genes.

Unless of course, you are Superman/Superwoman.

Here is Joe’s post:

Will you be able to afford health insurance, and will that insurance cover your pre-existing medical conditions? For most, that’s the biggest issue in the upcoming election. Congressional Republicans are planning to pass legislation that allows insurers to: a) stop … Continue reading This election is about your pre-existing medical condition

Source: This election is about your pre-existing medical condition – Managed Care Matters

Immigrants in construction — key facts « Working Immigrants

Peter Rousmaniere posted the following fact sheet about immigrants working in construction. While this has no bearing on health care at present, it does have some bearing on workers’ comp, especially in light of the current regime’s draconian policy towards immigrants from Central America.

As this “crisis” progresses, it may be harder for construction companies to find workers to employ on construction sites.

This, in turn would mean that they may be less construction work, and for the insurance industry, less risk and less profit to be made from insuring these projects.

In workers’ comp, that would translate into less frequency of losses, but it would also cut off revenue from carriers covering such risks.

And he promised to create jobs? Hardly.

Source: Immigrants in construction — key facts « Working Immigrants

Americans Are Skipping Health Insurance

Bloomberg on Monday published an article by John Tozzi that reported that some Americans are taking a risk and skipping health insurance because of the cost.

In the article, “Why Some Americans Are Risking It and Skipping Health Insurance”, Bloomberg interviews three families; the Buchanans of Marion, North Carolina, the Owenses of Harahan, Louisiana, and the Bobbies in a suburb of Phoenix, Arizona.

The Buchanans decided that paying $1,800 a month was too much for health insurance and decided to go without it for the first time in their lives.

Doubling insurance premiums convinced the Owenses to do so as well, and Mimi Owens said that, “We’re not poor people but we can’t afford health insurance.”

Saving money to pay for their nine-year-old daughter Sophia, who was born with five heart defects, forced the Bobbies to go uninsured for themselves and their son Joey.

These three families are but a small part of the dozen other families Bloomberg is following to understand the trade-offs when a dollar spent on health insurance cannot be spent on something else. Some are comfortable financially, others are just scrapping by.

According to Tozzi, the share of Americans without insurance is near historic lows, the current administration is rolling back parts of the ACA. At the same time, Tozzi reports, the cost for many people to buy a plan is higher than ever.

In the case of the Buchanans, wife Dianna, 51, survived a bout with cancer 15 years ago, her husband, Keith has high blood pressure and takes testosterone. Both make more than $127,000 a year from an IT business and her job as a physical therapy assistant. They have additional income from properties they own.

However, their premium last year was $1,691, triple their mortgage payment, and was going up to $1,813 this year. A deductible of $5,000 per-person meant that having and using coverage would cost more than $30,000.

What made the Buchanans take this step was when Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina and the major hospital system in Asheville, could not reach an agreement, putting the hospital out of network. Keith Buchanan said, “It was just two greed monsters fighting over money.” He also said, “They’re both doing well, and the patients are the ones that come up short.”

The Buchanans are now members of a local doctors’ practice, for which they pay $198 a month. They also signed up for a Christian group that pools members’ money to help pay for medical costs. For this membership, it costs the Buchanans $450 a month, and includes a $150 surcharge based on their blood pressure and weight.

After dropping their coverage with Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Keith injured his knee, went to an urgent care center and was charged $511 for the visit and an X-ray. “If we can control our health-care costs for a couple of years, the difference that makes on our household income is phenomenal,” Keith said.

There is evidence, Tozzi writes, that having insurance is a good thing. People with insurance spend less out of pocket, are less likely to go bankrupt, see the doctor more often, get more preventive care, are less depressed and have told researchers they feel healthier.

Yet, some 27.5 million Americans under age 65 were uninsured in 2016 (myself included), about 10 percent of the population, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The most common reason cited by KFF was that the cost was too high. A Gallup poll suggested that despite declining for years, the percentage of adults without coverage has increased slightly since the end of 2016.

However, other data, Tozzi writes, showed no significant change.

The following chart outlines the household income and health insurance status of people under 65 who qualify for government help with having insurance.

For the Bobbie family, the current administration’s proposal to make it easier for Americans to buy cheaper health plans could open options for the rest of the Bobbie family, but with over $1 million in medical costs for Sophia, these less-expensive choices would lack some of the protection created by the ACA that allowed her to get coverage.

The tax scam that became law in December will lift the ACA’s requirement that every American have coverage or pay a fine.

Some states are trying out the new rules, offering plans that don’t adhere to ACA requirements. This is the case in Idaho where the state’s Blue Cross insurer attempted to offer a so-called “Freedom Plan” that had annual limits on care and questionnaires that would allow them to charge higher premiums to sick people or those likely to become sick.

The current administration judged reluctantly that this plan violated ACA rules.

The Owenses decided to do something like what the Buchanans did. They tried a Christian health-sharing ministry for a few months, but joined a direct-primary care group, which Mimi Owens called, “the best care we’ve ever had.”

The three American families are by no means not alone in having to decide whether to have insurance or to take the risk and forgo paying huge premiums to save money or to use it for another family member with more pressing medical issues.

Two of these families are not low-income, as they both earn over $100,000 a year and could afford to buy health coverage if it was affordable. But the reality is that premiums have risen and will continue to rise and will price them out of the market.

Except for the Bobbies, no one in the other two families have serious medical issues that are exceedingly expensive, and they have found lower cost alternatives, but for many other families in the U.S., that may not be an option.

The only real solution is universal health care. Then the Buchanans, Owenses, and Bobbies of America will not have to worry about how they are going to pay for medical bills if some serious medical condition arises. We can and should be better than this.

Insurance/Risk Management/Health Care Thought Leader Seeks Opportunities

Insurance/Risk Management (Workers’ Comp)/Health Care Thought Leader and Blogger seeks remote or virtual opportunities. Project work appreciated.

Experience:

Over fifteen years’ experience in Workers’ Compensation, Risk Management, and Property & Casualty Insurance.

WC, GL, P&C Claims Management, WC Statistical Reporting, Data Analysis, Management & Reporting.

Content Writer with five years experience creating and maintaining professional blog analyzing current issues in Workers’ Compensation and Healthcare.

Analyzed the cost of health care and the options of alternative treatments abroad.

Interested in working remotely, willing to travel.

Resume can be found here.

Blog: richardkrasner.wordpress.com

Fallout of the End of ACA Subsidies

Joe Paduda today gave a very succinct and clear-minded assessment of the fallout of the ending of the ACA subsidies, also known as Cost-Sharing Reimbursement (CSR) payments.

Here is Joe’s article.

It makes perfect sense that what the Orange man said yesterday will do more damage to health care than his false and misleading pronouncements of the past year that the ACA is failing and doing harm.

It is you, sir, who are doing harm. To the poor, to minorities like those in Puerto Rico despite your morning mea culpa, to African-Americans and Latinos,  to women, to international agreements and organizations,  and to our credibility with our allies and adversaries.

 

Dear Reader, con’t.

Last month, I told you that I was planning to shut down my blog because of my acceptance of a new position.

Unfortunately, some things were not meant to be, and while I was waiting until the new year to end the blog, I have decided to reverse course and keep it up and running, so those of you who have enjoyed my writing will have more to enjoy, I hope.

This still leaves me back where I was in October when I accepted the position, so if any of you have something in mind, let me know.

I am open to consulting with anyone. Resume furnished upon request.