Tag Archives: Insurance

Insurance/Risk Management/Health Care Thought Leader Seeks Opportunities

Insurance/Risk Management (Workers’ Comp)/Health Care Thought Leader and Blogger seeks remote or virtual opportunities. Project work appreciated.

Experience:

Over fifteen years’ experience in Workers’ Compensation, Risk Management, and Property & Casualty Insurance.

WC, GL, P&C Claims Management, WC Statistical Reporting, Data Analysis, Management & Reporting.

Content Writer with five years experience creating and maintaining professional blog analyzing current issues in Workers’ Compensation and Healthcare.

Analyzed the cost of health care and the options of alternative treatments abroad.

Interested in working remotely, willing to travel.

Resume can be found here.

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Fallout of the End of ACA Subsidies

Joe Paduda today gave a very succinct and clear-minded assessment of the fallout of the ending of the ACA subsidies, also known as Cost-Sharing Reimbursement (CSR) payments.

Here is Joe’s article.

It makes perfect sense that what the Orange man said yesterday will do more damage to health care than his false and misleading pronouncements of the past year that the ACA is failing and doing harm.

It is you, sir, who are doing harm. To the poor, to minorities like those in Puerto Rico despite your morning mea culpa, to African-Americans and Latinos,  to women, to international agreements and organizations,  and to our credibility with our allies and adversaries.

 

Dear Reader, con’t.

Last month, I told you that I was planning to shut down my blog because of my acceptance of a new position.

Unfortunately, some things were not meant to be, and while I was waiting until the new year to end the blog, I have decided to reverse course and keep it up and running, so those of you who have enjoyed my writing will have more to enjoy, I hope.

This still leaves me back where I was in October when I accepted the position, so if any of you have something in mind, let me know.

I am open to consulting with anyone. Resume furnished upon request.

Blocked Aetna-Humana Merger Reveals True Reason for Pullout from ACA

In an article yesterday in Business Insider, the recently blocked merger between Aetna and Humana is the reason given for Aetna’s sudden decision to leave the ACA exchanges.

Contradictory statements from Aetna in response to this decision, as to their ability to profit from the merger or not profiting from the exchanges, does not hide the fact that the bottom line is this:

The laws of Capitalism are incompatible with the goals of providing health care to everyone, even with all the fancy commercials and advertisements from the insurance companies that they are there for you.

BS!

They are not there for you, unless you are a top executive of the company, or a stockholder or shareholder, or investor. As the article states, this merger would have led to a consolidation of the health care industry to only three mega companies.

Do you want to wait until there is only one, a la the 1970’s movie, “Rollerball”, where corporations have dominated whole industries and replaced nations, or do you want to provide health care to all, no matter what their ability to pay, or if it makes a profit for some greedy bastards?

The choice is up to you.

Here is the link to the entire BI article:

http://www.businessinsider.com/aetna-humana-merger-reason-for-leaving-obamacare-2016-8

Hospitals Launching Private Health Plans Have Concerns: What It Could Mean to Work Comp

My fellow FAU alumna, Maria Todd, wrote a very good article about what’s at stake for hospitals considering launching private health plans.

While Maria’s article focuses on hospitals and general health care, it would be prudent for the workers’ comp industry to pay attention to what she has to say, as her expertise in the areas of health care, hospital development, healthcare marketing and branding, concierge medicine and medical tourism has taken Maria around the world several times (lucky her – “I never get to go anywhere”).

There is one item Maria raises in her article that should be of vital interest to workers’ comp.

According to Maria, the process to launch private health plans is fraught with complexity and extreme financial risk. She goes on to add that it involves, at a minimum, obtaining a state license and meeting (and maintaining) capital reserve requirements adequate to cover IBNR (incurred but not reported) claims lags.

Those of us who have been in the claims arena of work comp know a little something about IBNR claims, and what that can do to both a carrier’s loss picture and an insured’s frequency and severity, which affects their experience mod.

If hospitals do choose to launch such plans, they will move closer to being insurance companies that happen to provide medical care, rather than just providing medical care as a hospital.

Maria’s recommendation is that they sink their money into something better that will float.

Change for Change’s Sake: What Real Change in Workers’ Comp Looks Like

Note: This is my 200th post, so I think you will find it to be one of the best articles I have written so far.

Every industry has its share of conferences, conventions and meetings around the country. The insurance and risk management industries, which includes the workers’ comp industry, is no exception.

In the early stage of my career, I worked for a small, retail insurance broker on New York’s Long Island, and the men in my company would attend the Risk and Insurance Management Society (RIMS) Conference every year.

I am sure they went there to learn about things other brokers were doing, make connections with insurance company executives, and workers’ comp service providers. But typically, these conferences allowed the participants to hang out with their buddies at the bar, and play a round or two of golf.

So I was mildly amused when I read an article posted today in The Workers’ Compensation Daily from Safety National Insurance Company, titled “It’s Time to Change Workers’ Compensation”.

The article discussed a recent meeting of the Harbor Health Systems 2015 MPN (Medical Provider Networks) Medical Directors, in which an executive from Sedgwick gave the keynote address. His address discussed the need for change in the approach to workers’ comp claims handling.

Harbor Health Systems is based in California, and through the writings of my fellow blogger, David De Paolo, and the personal experiences of two women I previously wrote about, “Ms. X” and “Ms. A”, the California workers’ comp system could use more than a keynote address to change the problems and abuses injured workers are receiving in that state.

FYI, Harbor Health Systems is a subsidiary of One Call Care Management, a company that for the past two years or so has been gobbling up smaller companies, especially in the pharmacy benefit management arena, as well as other smaller workers’ compensation service providers, and as Joe Paduda reported earlier this week, One Call Care Management has acquired an imaging company called MedFocus.

According to Joe, this acquisition consolidates One Call’s stranglehold on the market, so if this is the kind of change Mr. North of Sedgwick was referring to, then it is more of the same.

The article goes on to say that the role of a medical director is to be there to help injured workers to recover from their injuries and resume their lives. I believe “Ms. X” and “Ms. A” would beg to differ.

The article also goes on to say that for years, the workers’ comp medical networks have focused on two things: discount and proximity. They would send injured workers to the physician closest to the employer’s location who would agree to accept a discount on the treatment provided.

Over time, they realized this approach was flawed, and that they should identify the medical providers who produce the best outcomes and incentivize them to treat injured workers by compensating them fairly.

They are learning that when they find these superior physicians, they need to get out of their way and let them practice medicine. The rest of the article details how the industry needs to evolve in how they devote resources to claims, how to better explain the workers’ comp system and protections it provides, and to avail themselves of the opportunities the ACA provides to evolve the way medical care is delivered.

According to Mr. North, when it comes to change, there are three main categories of people:

  • Innovators – people who are truly creating change
  • Learners – people who take what innovators created and work to evolve it
  • Ignorers – people who are uncomfortable with change and have a tendency to ignore it as long as possible

He said that workers’ comp cannot evolve if they are unwilling to take risks and become innovators; otherwise change will not happen.

I agree with his analysis, and my posts have attested to that fact time and time again. Therefore using his categories, it is clear that I would be considered an innovator, since I have been advocating implementing medical travel into workers’ comp.

Workers’ comp needs to take risks, and medical travel affords them of one of those risks.

Yet, those who have derided my idea, or who have not paid any attention to what I am saying, are ignorers, and there may even be people who would see to it that medical travel never becomes part of workers’ comp.

So I would like to add a fourth category to this list. Call them defenders of the status quo, or preventers, or even saboteurs, if it ever got that far.

So what is this change Mr. North is talking about? Is it real change, or just change for the sake of change? And what does real change look like?

Real change is not keeping injured workers and the system locked in a padded cell, wrapped in a straitjacket.

Real change is not buying up smaller companies and cornering the market, so that the very idea of competition is tossed on the dustbin of history.

Real change is not doing the same things over and over again and expecting different results.

Real change is not being afraid to look outside of one’s comfort zone, and outside of one’s national borders at a time when your industry is facing challenges from the expansion of out-out legislation that threatens to destroy workers’ comp, rising medical costs, physician shortages, questions of the constitutionality of exclusive remedy, negative media reports, changes in technology and diversification, and other “seismic shifts”.

Real change is becoming a learner, and I am looking for learners to work with. Real change is being fearless and recognizing that Americans are not the only ones who are able to provide quality medical care.

Real change is going with the flow of change in the world today and joining the globalized world; otherwise you stagnate and die. Time is running out. Real change is possible, but you must go after it.

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I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com. Share this article, or leave a comment below.

SCOTUS Decision Could Benefit Medical Travel for Workers’ Comp

Back in April, James Moore was kind enough to re-post one of my earlier blog articles on his blog, so I am returning the favor.

James writes a lot about workers’ comp and how to cut costs, so his insights into such things as the Supreme Court’s much anticipated decision on the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) future, and how it may impact workers’ comp claims, is something that the medical travel industry needs to know about.

There are no doubt, many opinions on what the Court’s decision may mean for the viability of the health care law, the subsidies that the government has granted to those who cannot afford to pay for all or part of the premiums, as well as the future of health care in the US in general.

And there are just as many opinions on what impact, if any, this momentous decision will have on workers’ comp, because the issue of cost-shifting.

Should the Court find for the government in King v Burwell, then there will be very little impact on workers’ comp, as those who currently have coverage under the ACA will continue to receive insurance. But should the Court decide for the plaintiff, King, millions will lose that coverage, and many will try to get covered under work comp.

It is James’ view, that should the Court decide for the plaintiff, workers’ comp claims departments might get more traffic than they can handle in the coming summer months. So, it is imperative for anyone touting the benefits of medical travel to be aware that you can offer an alternative and a release valve to the workers’ comp industry, should James’ prediction come true.

Yet, House Republicans, as reported today in the New York Times, are worried about what might happen to them, should they prevail in the Court.

So James’ article is both timely and relevant to the purpose of this blog, to implement medical travel into workers’ comp in order to better serve the injured worker and his or her employer. The Court’s decision has, as James will point out in the article below, unintended consequences.

James’ byline appears at the end of his article.

ACA Subsidy Decision Could Affect Workers Comp

The US Supreme Court ACA decision could easily affect Workers Comp.  Let us call it the old Law of Unintended Consequences.

There are multiple articles on this blog concerning the Affordable Health Care Act (Obamacare) and its possible effect on WC.

For reference some of the articles are:

Would the Workers Compensation industry actually see a spike in claims if the Supreme Court guts the ACA?   My answer would be an unequivocal – Yes.

I have always felt since working my way through the WC claims hierarchy that people are going to look under every stone to find some type of insurance coverage.

A possible scenario in this case would be that all of a sudden someone cannot renew their ACA-sponsored policy.  Who could blame that person for attempting to file a WC claim to receive treatment for an injury that was originally treated under a health insurance policy?  Desperate people do desperate things.

This is not to say these types of claims would ever be accepted by a WC claims department. However, if the claim is reported, the requirement of a full investigation will still use up a large amount of time for a claims department.

The states and the Feds have all said they will bring in measures to keep health insurance alive for ACA policies.

However, would there not likely be a haircut of people covered as the health insurance carriers would only have to look at the Law of Large Numbers to see that a smaller group of health plan participants would prevent the risk being spread among a large enough group.

I am not advocating for or against the ACA.  Numbers do not lie, unless you look at the wrong numbers.

One only has to look to the opinion proffered by Dr. Richard Victor- the outgoing Director of WCRI. He presented a very interesting slant on how WC and the Affordable Healthcare Act would collide with each other.

The US Supreme Court ACA decision is likely days or weeks away.  In the words of Bananarama, it could be a “Cruel, Cruel Summer” if you work in a WC claims department.

By James J. Moore, J & L Risk Management Consultants

James’ blog can be found here at J & L Risk Management Consultants.

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I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com. Share this article, or leave a comment below.