Tag Archives: Globalization

Ashley Furniture and Medical Travel, part 2

As promised last month, here is the Spotlight article from Medical Travel Today.com about Ashley Furniture’s foray into Medical Travel for their employees.

In case you missed it, here is the link to part 1 of the article.

Advertisements

Foreign Patients Get Liver Transplants in US Hospitals First

ProPublica, those lovely folks who published several articles some time back on workers’ comp, are at it again.

This time, they are focusing their ire on how foreign patients are getting liver transplants at some US hospitals ahead of Americans waiting for such transplants.

The story, published yesterday, was co-published with a local Fox station in New Orleans.

From 2013 to 2016, New York-Presbyterian Hospital gave 20 livers to foreign nationals who came to the US solely for a transplant, essentially exporting the organs and removing them from the pool of available livers to New Yorkers.

Dr. Herbert Pardes (I was familiar with his name from living in NY), wrote that, “Patients in equal need of a liver transplant should not have to wait and suffer differently because of the U.S. state where they reside.”

Dr, Pardes was the former chief executive, and is now the executive vice president of the board at New York-Presbyterian.

Yet, according to the story, Dr. Pardes left out NY-P’s contribution to the shortage, as stated above from 2013 to 2016.

These 20 livers represent 5.2 percent of the hospital’s liver transplants during that time, which was one of the highest ratios in the country.

ProPublica reported that unknown to the public, or to sick patients and their families, organs donated domestically are sometimes given to patients flying in from other countries, who often pay a premium. Some hospitals even seek them out.

A company from Saudi Arabia said it signed an agreement with Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans in 2015.

The practice is legal, according to the story, and foreign nationals must wait their turn in the same way as domestic patients. The transplant centers justify this on medical and humanitarian grounds, but at a time when we have an Administration touting “America First”, this may run counter to the national mood.

The  director of the transplant institute at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, Dr. Sander Florman, said he struggles with “in essence, selling the organs we do have to foreign nationals with bushels of money.”

Between 2013 and 2016, 252 foreigners came to the US purely to receive livers at American hospitals. In 2016, the most recent year for which there is data, the majority of foreign recipients were from countries in the Middle East, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Israel and the UAE. Another 100 foreigners staying in the US as non-residents also received livers.

At the same time, more than 14,000 people, nearly all Americans, are waiting for livers, a figure that has remained very high for decades, they report. By comparison, fewer than 8,000 liver transplants were performed last year in the US, an all-time high. National median wait time is more than 14 months, and in NY, the time is longer.

In 2016. more than 2.600 patients were removed from waiting lists nationally, either because they died or were too sick to receive a liver transplant.

All this is happening at a time when the party in power is seeking to take health care away from those who recently received care for the first time in a long time from the ACA, and at a time when the medical travel industry is focused not on transplant surgeries, but on boutique treatments and surgeries for wealthy or upper middle class Americans to go abroad for bariatric, plastic or reconstructive surgery, knee surgery, dental care, etc.

And yet, when the very idea of medical travel is broached in the medical community, it is disparaged and discouraged by physicians and others as unsafe, impractical, and not worth the effort, Obviously, it is well worth the effort on the part of foreign patients to come here and take organs meant for Americans, so why not allow Americans to take their organs?

Is it because the hospitals that supply these organs to foreign patients are making huge sums of money, and the poor schnook American with liver disease (or kidney disease, as in the case of yours truly) must die so that an American hospital can improve its bottom line?

It is high time to cut the crap and promote medical travel the right way and for the right reasons, not only for those who can afford it, but those who need transplants and can’t get them here.

That is the true nature of the globalization of healthcare…a two-way street.

 

The Fork in the Road in Medical Travel

Returning to the main theme of this blog, I came across the following insightful article by Ruben Toral last week that posed the question, “Is Medical Tourism Dying a Slow Death?”

As someone who has been interested in opportunities in Medical Travel for some time, and  disappointed in not being able to elicit interest in my idea for Medical Travel, I was interested in seeing what Ruben had to say, and to see if it measured up to my views of the industry, as I know it.

According to Ruben, the industry exhibits the traits of a typical product/business cycle, whereby the first and fast movers establish leadership by developing and commercializing the concept, then late adopters pile in to get in on the action.

He goes on to decry the same speakers at every medical tourism event around the world talking about the same things, which is enough to hit the snooze button and go back to sleep.

He also laments the lack of innovation, and says that key players are just trying to manage the slow growth rather than investing in the next wave.

VC investors, Ruben says, talk of getting burned on medical tourism investments that simply cannot scale like other businesses, because, as they quickly learn, healthcare is a different animal than retail and you burn through a lot of cash fast trying to buy eyeballs and audience.

And investment analysts ask the same question after pouring through hospital financial reports and see how hospitals are managing and protecting profit margins: “Where’s the growth?” And even large meeting and events companies are not “flogging medical tourism” because attendance and interest is way down.

So, is this the beginning of the end or the inflection point for medical tourism?, Ruben asks. For his part, he does not know, but if it is not the beginning of the end, or an inflection point, it is most certainly a fork in the road.

Where it goes from here is as good a guess as mine and Ruben’s, but it is up to those who are serious and dedicated to growing the industry to regroup and start again to build interest and enthusiasm for medical travel, and to address some of the glaring issues facing the industry.

But that won’t happen until there are changes within and without the industry…in technology and in strategy.

Global Medical Tourism Industry Market Analysis

Note: The following is a re-print from U.S. Domestic Medical Travel.com, one of two publications from CPR Strategic Marketing Communications. They also publish Medical Travel Today.com, and both publications have re-printed several of my posts on both of their newsletters, so I am returning the favor, which they have paid me many times over. I do not vouch for the accuracy of the data in the article, so please address any comments to the author.

Here is the article:

Global Medical Tourism Market By Treatment Type and by Region – Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth Trends and Forecasts (2016 – 2021)

The global medical tourism market has been estimated to be valued at USD 14,278 million, and it is anticipated to reach a market value of USD 21,380 million by the end of 2021 at a projected CAGR of 8.41% during the forecast period, 2016 to 2021.

Medical tourism involves travelling to another country for obtaining medical treatment. It is a high-growth industry driven by globalization and rising healthcare costs in the developed countries. A study shows that in United States, about 750,000 residents travel abroad for healthcare each year. A range of governments across the globe has taken up various initiatives to stimulate and improve the medical tourism in the respective countries in order to improve patient care and help expand the market. Many countries could see potential for significant economic development in the emergent field of medical tourism. Cosmetic surgery, dental care, elective surgery, fertility treatments, cardiovascular surgery and genetic disorder treatments are the most preferred healthcare treatments in this sector.

High cost of medical treatment in the developed countries and availability of those treatments at a lower cost in other countries have fueled the development of medical tourism. In addition, the availability of latest medical technologies and a growing compliance on international quality standards drive this market. The use of English as the main working language solves the problem of communication and patient satisfaction, adding to the growth of this market. Enhanced patient care, health insurance portability, advertising and marketing help the medical tourism industry to grow at a fast rate. On the other hand, infection outbreaks during or after travel, issues in following up with the patients before returning to their own country, and medical record transfer issues are the factors restraining the growth of the tourism industry. However, the unavailability of certain treatments at a lower cost hampers this market more than any other factors.

The global market for the medical tourism industry is segmented based on treatment type (cosmetic treatment, dental treatment, cardiovascular treatment, orthopedics treatment, bariatric surgery, fertility treatment, eye surgery and general treatment) and geographical regions. Cosmetic treatments hold the largest market share, as cosmetic surgeries are not covered by insurance.

Based on geography, the market is segmented into North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. APAC holds the largest market share, followed by Europe. Thailand and Malaysia are strong markets with prospect for significant growth, followed by Korea.

The key players in the global medical tourism market are Bangkok Hospital Medical Center, Asian Heart Institute, Apollo Hospitals Enterprise Ltd., Bumrungrad International Hospital, Fortis Healthcare Ltd., Min-Sheng General Hospital, Raffles Medical Group, Prince Court Medical Center, KPJ Healthcare Berhad, and Samitivej Sukhumvit.

For more information please click on:
http://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/mkptu7l/4109970

The Dog Days of Summer

Now that the temperature has climbed into triple digits in some places, and others are feeling the heat of 90 plus degree days, I thought it would be good just to let my readers know that I am still here, even though I have not been writing much as of late.

Maybe that is because of the sudden death of David De Paolo and the industry is coming to grips with his tragic loss, it may also be that not much is happening as this is now summer vacation season, and people are away from the business world.

This time has given me an opportunity to concentrate on more personal matters that are of immediate importance to my well-being, and to reconsider the direction of this blog.

I have a vision, a vision some of you share, and a vision many of you cannot see, but as there are vested interests who stand in the way of progress in one industry my vision relates to, and the other industry is fixated on the “how”, and not on “why not”, and is plagued with doubts about just how big it really is, economically, as has recently been reported.

But a vision is not enough if there are barriers and obstacles and negativity surrounding it to transform the way things currently are done. There has to be a recognition that hard work and determination and perseverance are necessary to break down those barriers and obstacles, and faith in the efficacy of the vision is needed to turn a negative into a positive.

So, therefore I have decided to write less about the vision, and more about what is happening in the industry and in healthcare in general that I feel my readers would like to see. It does not mean I have given up; it just means that until the forces of globalization break the legal and financial barriers and obstacles standing in the way of medical travel for workers’ comp, and the industry itself comes to realize that it must change or go quietly into that good night that automation and artificial intelligence are leading it to, there is no point in pounding it into closed minds.

As for those who seek my explanation of “how” this could be accomplished, you are forgetting that this is not something that is already happening. There is no blueprint, no guidelines for opening up a closed system like workers’ comp to the rest of the world. It takes partnerships and brainpower and commitment, not some get rich quick scheme.

Those of you who ply your trade in medical travel are looking for the quick fix, the easy way out, and the rapid turnover of patients to medical facilities. It is not happening in general healthcare, and it certainly is not happening in workers’ comp, and not without sweat equity on your part.

I’ve said my piece for more than three years, and no one has seriously taken me up on this, so that is also why I am changing course. Medical travel will happen one day, but it won’t take conferences and meaningless certifications from fast-buck artists to make it happen.

One last note, I too lost someone recently who was a dear friend and mentor in my career. We met here in Florida in the 90’s. He died suddenly of a massive stroke, according to his wife, who answered his cell phone when I called him near two weeks ago. I learned about it the same week David De Paolo died. They will be missed. David by the industry he loved, and my friend by me.

Have a safe summer.

 

Foreign-born Workers on the Rise: What it Means for Work Comp and Medical Travel

Working Immigrants.com posted a report this weekend that indicated that the percentage of foreign-born workers in the US will rise from 16% to 20% of the workforce over the next 26 years.

It will grow for the next 15 years, then the pace will slow considerably. Citing a Census Bureau publication from March 2015, Working Immigrants said that the total population of the US is expected to grow from about 319 million in 2014, to 359 million in 2030, and 380 million in 2040, which is an increase of 19% over the next 26 years.

According to the report, the working age population will grow by 12%.

There is a higher rate of employment among foreign-born, due to the fact that they mainly come here to work, and they are more concentrated in working age brackets ― 80% between 18 and 64, vs 62% among native born.

Modest increases in the foreign-born population will result in higher shares of employment for these workers.

By 2040, foreign-born workers will be one fifth of the workforce.

It is a given that not many of these workers will have a great command of English, and the most likely foreign-born workers will be Hispanics and Asians.

A workforce that does not have a command of English, is mainly from Central and South America and Asia, will no doubt put a strain on an already strained social welfare system, especially workers’ comp, since they are more likely to be injured on the job.

So those of you in the medical travel industry looking for patients and trying to entice well-off Americans down to Latin America for dental work, cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery, and other treatments not available in the US or that are too expensive, should consider expanding your offerings to your fellow Latino immigrants, or change direction and consider doing so by offering to facilitate less expensive surgeries for common injuries found in the workers’ comp space.

And those of you in workers’ comp who have shut your minds to new ideas and refuse to listen to what I am saying, either should learn Spanish or Chinese, or deal with the changing nature of health care globally, and stop worrying about stepping on the toes of the vested interests, and start thinking about the interests of all those new foreign-born workers who will be coming here in the next 26 years (24 now that it is 2016).

They may not feel comfortable going to a hospital for surgery if the staff there does not speak their language, or the food is unfamiliar, and they may even recover faster if they know they are surrounded by friends and family in their home country. That will lead to a more productive and happier employee.

And a happier employee will improve your bottom line.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Comp Blog is now viewed all over the world in over 250 countries and political entities. I have published 300 articles and counting, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

RIP GLOBALIZATION?

From all the commentary this weekend and on Friday about the referendum to leave the European Union (EU) in the UK, it would seem that the dream of a handful of international bankers, multinational corporation heads and politicians of both the left and the right since the end of the Second World War have made a terrible and unforeseen error in pushing for a globalized world economy.

How did we get to this place? Simple, as a result of the economic policies of the 1920’s and 1930’s, Europe and her allies in North America, were plunged into a second global conflict. Near the end of the conflict, the economic leaders of the Allied nations gathered in Bretton Woods, NH to carve out the Bretton Woods Agreement, which established the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.

Along with this, came the United Nations to deal with the political and military crises that would arise in the second half of the twentieth century. To provide greater perspective, we must go back to the First World War and recognize that here in the US, many Americans were woefully ignorant not only about world affairs, but of geography as well. In 1914, I doubt many Americans could point out just where Sarajevo or Serbia was, or where any of the other nations drawn up into that war were located.

Following on the heels of an earlier organization, the National Civic Federation, several prominent business, political, academic, labor and other leaders formed the Council on Foreign Relations. The Council promoted the study of geography and political science in colleges and universities, as well as promoting social studies in high schools and junior high schools.

The Council also published Foreign Affairs magazine, which became a forum for the discussion of world events and dissemination of political theories and policies from leading academics and business leaders. But there was one other thing that the Council did. It provided the US government with its future Secretaries of State, War, Treasury, and later Defense, among other lesser administration positions from the 1920’s onward.

My first major in college was political science, and more specifically, international relations and foreign policy. I also had a graduate course in American Foreign Policy at NYU as part of my History Masters degree.

After WWII, the Cold War forced many of the Western countries to realize that in order to defend against Communism, as they had against Fascism, they needed to have greater cooperation. So the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or NATO was born, and within Western Europe, the idea of European cooperation led to the formation of the Common Market, of which the UK was a member.

In the 1950’s and 60’s, the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) and  was created, followed by the European Economic Community (EEC). These developments were spelled out in the Brussels Treaty of 1948, the Paris Treaty of 1951, the Modified Brussels Treaty of 1954, and the Rome Treaty of 1957.

In the 1960’s, the Merger Treaty of 1965 created the European Communities, made up of the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), as well as the  ECSC and EEC.

The Maastrict Treaty of 1992 created the European Union, and its membership has grown steadily, especially after the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe and the breakup of the Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact.

Meanwhile, in other regions of the world, similar ideas were taking shape. In Asia, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was formed to do for Southeast Asia what NATO and the European Communities were doing for Europe.

To foster greater cooperation between North America, Western Europe and Japan, the three industrial regions of the world, David Rockefeller, Chairman of Chase Manhattan Bank and Zbigniew Brzezinski created the Trilateral Commission. In the next two decades, membership in the Commission was expanded to every other region of the world.

Like the Council on Foreign Relations, members of the Commission could be involved in politics in their respective countries, but once they achieved national office of any kind, they resigned from the Commission. Membership was recommended by current members, and the incoming Jimmy Carter Administration of 1977-1981 saw the following members leave the Commission: Jimmy Carter, Walter Mondale, Harold Brown, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Cyrus Vance, among many others.

It was in college that I studied global politics, or what would become known as Globalization, and with the expansion of the Commission’s member countries, and the fall of Communism, it seemed that globalization would continue.

Yet, they made one big mistake. Neglecting to replace the jobs lost to globalization from the 70’s to the present and thinking that “free trade” conducted through treaties such as NAFTA, CAFTA, TPP, and under the approval of the WTO would benefit both the developed and underdeveloped worlds. Hardly, as the Brexit vote and the rise of Trump in the US, as well as Bernie Sanders on the left can testify to.

Globalization has been mostly a one-way street out of the developed countries and into the undeveloped or developing countries. It has had the unintended consequences of stirring up racism, bigotry and resentment, as well as distrust in institutions and government. It has also favored the wealthy and those international players already in the game, but locks out those who are attempting to benefit from it, as many in the medical travel industry have tried and failed to do.

With other European nations threatening to leave the EU, and opposition here to TPP, and other trade deals (“I’m going to make better deals”), it would seem that globalization, far from dead yet, may at least be stopped in its tracks for the foreseeable future. That may happen if the US does the stupid too, and elects a moron.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Comp Blog is now viewed all over the world in over 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.