Tag Archives: Cross-Border Health Care

Now It’s Personal

Last week, some of my LinkedIn connections, as well as several other connections, learned of my recent hospitalization. The reason for this was not mentioned at the time, but I will tell you now.

Not having health insurance through an employer, and being denied renewal of a local county health care program, led to my going from Stage 4 to End Stage Kidney Disease.

The hospitalization last week was to place a catheter in me for peritoneal dialysis, and to repair an umbilical hernia.

My hospitalization was brought to light quite unexpectedly by my friend, Maria Todd. Maria’s sending best wishes for my speedy recovery and quick discharge from the hospital was much appreciated, and the warm words by others in response, and the thirty plus “likes” made me feel that people cared. For that. I am grateful.

But the events of the past month have brought home to me one very important point, given the current activity surrounding the so-called “repeal and replace” of the ACA, and the two Congressional bills that many consider doing more harm than good.

This nation needs Medicare for All.

There, I said it.

I know in the past, I have advocated single payer for others, but my illness has shown that anyone who loses health care for any amount of time, once they have reached adulthood, cannot go without health insurance.

This is what happens when men and women are removed prematurely from the workforce, for whatever reason, employer decides you are no longer wanted, economic downturn or just to eliminate positions that affect the bottom-line of the company, and are generally targeted to individuals in their 40’s, 50’s and early 60’s so that the company can save on health care costs for those employees, and so that younger workers can be hired to replace them.

This is not something new, and not related to automation and artificial intelligence disrupting whole industries, which is inevitable.

My initial view on single-payer was that if employers were no longer responsible for the health insurance of their employees, and they were guaranteed full coverage by the government, some of the job losses of the past decades would not have happened, and many talented men and women out of the workforce would be employed until their retirement.

If you don’t believe me, go to LinkedIn and read the many posts from such individuals who are still unemployed. One fellow in Texas even got turned down from jobs at fast food restaurants.

So, now it is personal for me.

I also know that many of you make your living from the health care system we currently have, and that some of you have expounded on why you think a single payer system is unrealistic.

I get it that your financial outlook depends on working in a broken, free-market system because it pays your salary, but healthcare was not supposed to be a business, nor was it supposed to marketed like any other commodity.

If you don’t believe me, read what Pope Francis said: “health is not a consumer good, but rather a universal right, and therefore access to health care services cannot be a privilege.”

But try telling that to Messrs. McConnell, Ryan, Paul, et al in Congress, and the current POTUS, all of whom want to eliminate medical coverage for millions of Americans they received under the ACA, cut back Medicare and Medicaid, and destroy Social Security.

Now that I will be receiving dialysis, and quite likely will qualify for disability, the prospect of not having those resources is very personal to me, and could literally mean my life.

Look in the mirror, then look at your spouse, your children, your parents, your neighbors, friends, etc. What do you think would happen to them if these programs were eliminated? Would you have enough money to care for them? Would you have money to pay for private insurance?

I lost my mother last month to dementia. She died on her 85th birthday in a nursing home some miles from my home (the home she and my father bought), but if the Republicans in Congress had gotten their way, and she had lived longer, I feared she would have been forced out of that nursing home, with no place to go, and would have been an even bigger burden to me.

So, I really don’t care if you are a Democrat, Republican, Independent, Libertarian, Socialist, Liberal, or Conservative, we all need health care at some point in our lives.

One of the friends I met here in Florida back in the 90’s died last July of a stroke. He was 73. He worked out, never smoked, had a good life, three kids, and like many of you, worked in Risk Management, as well as Human Resources, the legal profession, and served in Vietnam. But despite all that, he died prematurely, and went into involuntary retirement because he was in his 60’s. Luckily, his wife worked. But you get the picture.

We must all do our part to see that every American can get health care. Not just access to care, which is a Republican euphemism for being able to afford it, and if you can’t, too bad. But actual health insurance. Medicare for All.

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Cross-Border Dental Care in Mexico

On Sunday, NBC Nightly News ran a video report on dental care in Los Algodones, Mexico, south of the border from Arizona, and west of Yuma.

According to the report, during the winter months, up to 7,000 Americans travel to Los Algodones for dental care.

Los Algodones, also known as “Molar City”, is the self-proclaimed dental capital of the world. While that sounds like hype, I can tell you from personal experience that it is not the only town on the border where one can find dozens of dental offices.

When I presented at the 5th Mexico Medical Tourism and Wellness Business Summit in 2014, I visited a town east of Reynosa called Nuevo Progresso where I saw some of the dental offices, along with some of the other attendees.

Here is the video from NBC.

http://www.nbcnews.com/widget/video-embed/1018704963518

And here are some pictures from Nuevo Progresso.

I took these pictures in a small medical center on the main street of Nuevo Progresso, just over the border from Texas. To the left of the picture on the left, is the bridge crossing the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo) into the US.

And the people I saw on the street were not Mexicans, they were Americans.

Still think medical travel is a stupid and ridiculous idea? Try telling it to the thousands who go across the border.

Washington State Workers’ Comp Accepts Foreign Medical Providers

Seven years ago, when I was working on my MHA degree, I wrote a paper which has become the basis of this blog.

During that time, I found the website of the Department of Labor & Industries for Washington State, and was surprised to find landing pages that listed physicians in Canada, Mexico, and other countries. These countries were mentioned in my paper, and I have referred to it in subsequent posts from time to time.

However, in the period since, I have noticed that the landing page for other countries was removed. I contacted WA state a while back and was told they were updating it. Yet, as of recently, it is still not been replaced, so I contacted them again yesterday.

I received a reply from Cheryl D’Angelo-Gary, Health Services Analyst at the WA Department of Labor & Industries. She indicated in her response that she is the business owner of the Find a Doctor application (FAD).

According to Ms. D’Angelo-Gary, “our experience showed that most of Washington’s injured workers who leave the country travel to one of these adjacent nations. Workers who travel further afield are advised to work with their claim manager to locate (or likely recruit) a provider. All worker comp claims with overseas mailing addresses are handled by a team of claim managers who have some extra training to help the worker find a qualified provider.”

I asked her to clarify this statement further in my next email by asking if this means that any claimant who travels outside of North America will have to ask the claims manager to find them a doctor.

She replied, “interesting questions!” She also differentiated between an injured worker who is traveling versus one who has relocated out of country.

She went on to say that, “a worker who is traveling and needs claim-related care would be instructed to seek treatment at an ER or urgent care clinic, where the providers do not need to be part of our network and would not be providing ongoing treatment. To be paid, the provider would have to send us a bill and a completed non-network application (available online). Under no circumstances should the provider bill the worker.”

However, she continued, “a worker who has relocated overseas must send in a change of address (required whenever a worker moves). That allows us to transfer management of the claim to a unit that specializes in out-of-country claims. The claim manager would work with the injured worker to help the worker find somebody in their new location. It’s critical (per state law) that the worker choose their own provider, though the provider must meet our requirements and standards of care. Proactive workers tend to handle this well, and find a provider in very little time; less proactive workers can find this challenging. We’re currently looking at this process to see how we can do this better.”

And in final emails to her last night, I tied the first scenario to medical travel, and the second scenario to ex-pats living abroad, but needing medical care. I also asked about workers who wanted to travel back to their home country for medical care, and said that I write about medical travel for workers’ comp.

As of today, I have not heard back, but it is early, and there is a three-hour difference between us.

It must be pointed out that WA state is what is termed a ‘monopolistic state’ in that the state does all the work of handling workers’ comp insurance and claims. Thus, when Ms. D’Angelo-Gary says that worker must work with the claim manager, the claim manager in question is a state employee, and not an employee of a commercial insurance company.

It may be possible, therefore, for medical travel to be implemented in workers’ comp, and it should be something that the medical travel industry and the state should explore together. Ms. D’Angelo-Gary did say they were looking at this process to do better. What better way to improve the process then by utilizing medical travel?

WA State Considering Telemedicine Legislation for WC

Legislators in Washington State are considering a bill, S. B. 5355, that would require the state’s Department of Labor & Industries to pay for telemedicine sert d require the department to provide access to telemedicine and reimburse providers for health care services provided to injured workers through such services.

The bill defines telemedicine as follows, according to the article, “the use of interactive audio and video technology, permitting real-time communication between the patient and the provider. ” It would exclude audio-only telephone calls (my White Paper mentioned this as a legal barrier to implementing medical travel into workers’ comp), fax messages, or emails.

Should this become legal, telemedicine services provided by hospitals, rural health clinics, physician offices, community mental health centers, and skilled nursing facilities would be covered.

This would have a profound impact on implementing medical travel into workers’ comp in Washington State, as this is one of two states that allows patients to travel outside the state or outside the country for medical treatment.

The Department of Labor & Industries has a page on their website called “Find A Doctor” where they list physicians in both Canada and Mexico, as well as the rest of the US, and when I began my research for my paper back in 2011, had a list of physicians in the following countries:  England, Germany, Honduras, New Zealand, the Philippines, Spain, Thailand and Ukraine.

As more states allow telemedicine services to be covered under workers’ comp, the day will come that getting surgery abroad, especially in the Western Hemisphere countries, will become reality, and will go a long way to lower costs and speed workers back to work, and relieve the stress to the health care system that repeal of the ACA will have on health care in the US.

Trump Esta Loco: What it May Mean for Cross-Border Healthcare

In picking a fight with Mexico over the building of a wall on the US/Mexico border, the current illegitimate occupant of the Oval Office is not only threatening the relationship with our nearest neighbor to the South, but with our number two trading partner, as the following stats point out for 2016:

2016 : U.S. trade in goods with Mexico
Total 2016 Exports: 211,848.7
Imports: 270,647.2
Net: -58,798.6

Source: https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c2010.html

By threatening to slap a 20% import tax on goods from Mexico, including his ties, this so-called businessman, will hurt the very farmers who voted for him, as well as the workers who buy their household goods from Walmart and other low-cost outlets, as many parts or food items are made or grown in Mexico. When I spoke at a medical tourism conference in Reynosa in 2014, we drove along the border area where the maquiladoras are located and saw that one of them makes frozen food that is sold across the border. Want to pay 20% more for that frozen TV dinner?

Then there is all that cerveza and tequila and mescal, not to mention avocados and guacamole that will cost more. Stay very thirsty my friends, because it will cost you more to drink with the most interesting man in the world, and all thanks to the least interesting man in the world.

What then does this mean for cross-border medical care?

If Herr Trump gets his way, not only will Mexican goods get more expensive, but if we get into a trade war, look for costs of medical care south of the border to go up as well, or even slow to a crawl or not at all. There is a hospital being built in Tijuana with the assistance of Scripps Health, and as I’ve written about in the past, the Insurance Company of the West already writes workers’ comp policies to include cross-border healthcare for their insured’s whose employees live in Mexico, but work in California.

Since the passage of NAFTA, trade between the US and Mexico has increased, and the towns along the border have benefitted from it. Back then, the talk of building a NAFTA superhighway was met with strong and fierce resistance (I was living in Texas at the time), but I realized that we already had one. It’s called Interstate 35, and runs from the Canadian border to the Mexican border, as does Interstate 5 on the West Coast.

In two earlier posts, I discussed a case in Arizona where the injured worker received two benefits, one from Mexico and one from Arizona (https://richardkrasner.wordpress.com/2014/01/20/nafta-work-comp-and-cross-border-medical-care-a-legal-view/) and (https://richardkrasner.wordpress.com/2015/02/04/nafta-work-comp-and-cross-border-medical-care-a-legal-view-update/).

So before you book that trip to Cancun for your tummy tuck or face lift, check to see if there is a 20% tax imposed on your flight, hotel, food, etc., from either the US or Mexican governments. If so, thank the orange-haired son of an orangutan.

donaldtrump-orangutan

Cut the C**P!

For my 300th article, I want to address the medical travel industry and its failure to rid itself of the crooks, liars, shysters, and phonies who prey upon the desperate.

Case in point, the article last Wednesday in the New York Times by Gail Kolata about one man’s experience getting stem cell therapy through medical travel.

This case is endemic of the industry’s impotence to police itself and get rid of those medical providers and hucksters who use slick promotional material to sell useless and often dangerous treatments or dubious procedures.

But what do you expect from an industry whose major organization is merely a conduit for funneling money into the pockets of the organization’s founders and their friends?

What do you expect from an industry that emphasizes attending conferences and not on standardizing the laws and processes for the provision of medical care across national borders.

When I started this blog over three years ago, I had high hopes that the industry would listen to what I had to say, and to at least consider offering medical travel to injured workers in the US. But as happened with the workers’ comp industry, no one has stepped up and offered to work with me.

I’m not mad at everyone in the industry. Many of you are very nice people and work very hard, but your focus is on such medical care as dentistry, cancer, cosmetic/plastic surgery, and other treatments not available in the US, or too expensive.

But helping those who are injured on the job, and many of whom are from many of the countries in this hemisphere who offer medical travel services, should be something some of you might want to do.

It was my hope that this industry would offer me a chance to change direction, but that has not happened, and now I am not sure if it ever will.  There does not seem to be any financial or employment opportunities here, just a lot of conferences and hyperbole.

Prove me wrong.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Comp Blog is now viewed all over the world in over 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

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Cross-Border Health Care in California Expands

In my earlier posts on cross-border health care, “Cross-border Workers’ Compensation a Reality in California“, “NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View“, “NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View: Update“, and “Cross-border Health Care and the ACA“, I discussed the way some Mexican workers living in Mexico, but working in the US or traveling between the US and Mexico, have been able to get health care on both sides of the border.

An article in Fierce Healthcare.com last month,  says that Scripps Health will help run a hospital in Tijuana, along with Sistemas Medicos Nacionales S.A. de C.V. (SIMNSA).

SIMNSA is the medical insurer in Mexico that the Insurance Company of the West (ICW) contracted with some time ago to treat Mexican workers of ICW’s US insureds in the San Diego/Imperial Valley area of CA.

According to the article by Ilene MacDonald, the insurer will design, build and operate the facility, and will seek accreditation from the international arm of the Joint Commission, the Joint Commission International (JCI), and will be an affiliate of the Scripps Health Network.

Those who think that cross-border health care, whether general or work comp-related is not going to happen better think again, because it is, and while this is just now involving the areas along the US-Mexico border, with or without that stupid wall some jerk wants to build and have Mexico pay for, medical travel on this continent is moving forward.

The only thing that is not happening yet is travel further down into Mexico and into the other countries in Central and South America. But that will happen, no matter what you or any putz running for president says.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Blog is now viewed all over the world in 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.