Tag Archives: conferences

We’ve Got to Stop Meeting Like This

This morning I received a notice of the upcoming IMTJ Summit next month in Athens, Greece. Last month, it was the Temos conference in Dusseldorf. And just after that one, one connection of mine traveled to China as an invited guest. I’d never heard of Temos before last month.

It seems that every month, year after year, there are conferences, summits, congresses, etc. all over the world, either on a global, regional, or national level.

I noticed these conferences are advertised in some of the online newsletters and print publications from the industry. Yet, when I started this blog, three newsletters, one in Singapore, one in Malaysia, and one in the US, closed within a year or so of them picking up my earliest posts on Medical Travel.

It is impossible, of course, for anyone to attend these conferences at the same time, so it must be very small crowds that attend, or a very privileged few who do.

A member of my family likes to attend every wedding, and that is not always possible. However, being invited would be nice occasionally.

This is not the first time I have spoken about the number of conferences in the Medical Travel industry, an industry, I think you will agree, that is not very big, and despite inflated numbers to the contrary, has not had the growth many would like to see.

I specifically titled this post, We’ve Got to Stop Meeting Like This, facetiously because I have only attended three conferences and have met only a handful of individuals. The rest I have connected with online, and really do not know, nor do they know me. I’m not so bad once you meet me.

I still get notices about the Mexican conference promoted by Carlos Arceo, even though he no longer invites non-facilitators and non-experts to his show. I haven’t even seen anything about the Costa Rican conference since I attended the one in 2014.

I wonder how much better this industry would look to the outside world if more non-facilitators, more passionate individuals such as myself and others would be invited to attend and present the industry in a more favorable light to the rest of the world.

Such conferences should not be private clubs or reserved for those with flexible schedules to jet all over the world, even if they are not speaking, and only showing their face.

Perhaps you can forgo for a time scheduling so many conflicting and coterminous conferences, and concentrate on making one great industry-wide conference to better organize the industry and to set standards and good practices for all participants in the industry.

Maybe then when we do meet at some of these conferences, we can joke that we really should stop meeting like this.

What do you think?

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An Open Letter to the Medical Tourism Industry

Dear Medical Tourism Industry,

I am writing you all to address some issues I am having with the industry on the occasion of my having past my five year anniversary writing this blog, and nearing another milestone, that of publishing 400 articles. At present, I am at 396.

For the past few weeks, I have noticed on the social media site, LinkedIn that some of my connections in the industry have been attending conferences around the world, and more recently, I have replied that I wished I was there and posted a recent post with the message to advertise my willingness to collaborate, or attend such conferences.

With the exception of one person this evening, not one person has responded positively, nor in the past five years has anyone other than one person invited me to speak at a conference, and that was three years ago in Mexico. The other two conferences I attended were here in Florida; one in Miami Beach, the other in Hollywood, Florida. The first in 2014, the second in 2012, and was the reason why I started writing my blog three days after it ended.

My intention then, as now, was to transition into a new career path, so that I could be employed and enjoy the things other people enjoy, and see the world before I am unable to. But In the past five years, while I have connected with practically all the major players in the industry, defended the industry in numerous posts, and even been critical of the industry at times; no one, not here in the US, nor anyone in Latin America or the Caribbean has invited me to a conference or a fam tour, nor to any other part of the world that is not part of some current conflict.

Recently, an American filmmaker had the premier of her film on medical travel on American television, on what we call the “Public Broadcasting System”. or PBS. I missed most of it, but was able to see two names in the credits that I recognized. One person I met in Miami Beach in 2014,  the other I am connected with on LinkedIn, but have never met. I tried to contact the filmmaker, but when she did not respond, I contacted my connection, who told me she was leery about responding because I had had an association with an organization we all know, but do not like that purports to represent the industry. He had to tell her that I am legitimate.

Folks, after five years of writing, and six, almost seven, of researching the industry, and being viewed on every major continent, you would think that many of you would know that I am honest, sincere, and definitely a legitimate advocate for medical travel.

Last week, I discovered that there was a conference in Dusseldorf, Germany, and today, I learned that one of my other connections, who I did meet in Reynosa in 2014. was invited to a conference in China. What does it take to be taken seriously and given the respect and courtesy of being invited to attend these functions after all this time?

I began my work in 2011. This coming March will be seven years since I wrote my White Paper. The paper is on my blog. My articles, even those covering Workers’ Comp and Health Care have not generated many views on a daily basis, save for a few here and there. I admit, they all cannot be prize winners, but at least I am persistent. Yet, I am not making headway with the industry, nor am I getting any compensation for writing,

I don’t want to sound like I am complaining, but I feel that after all this time, it is wrong for me to be ignored. I have committed long hours of my time and my life to this industry, even as my health over the summer was an issue. I am not out of the woods yet, but I am doing ok, and with the proper treatment, and eventual surgery, I should be healthy in the future, and can travel until such time, as long as I have more than two weeks notice.

In the beginning of my blog writing, I added a section where I asked readers to tell me where they are from and who they were. No one responded, so I stopped the practice. I still would like to hear from you, but after reading this letter, I hope you will do more than just dropping me a note.

I am waiting to meet you and to participate in future conferences.

Sincerely,

Richard Krasner, MA, MHA

Map shows countries to date where my blog has been viewed.

Change for Change’s Sake: What Real Change in Workers’ Comp Looks Like

Note: This is my 200th post, so I think you will find it to be one of the best articles I have written so far.

Every industry has its share of conferences, conventions and meetings around the country. The insurance and risk management industries, which includes the workers’ comp industry, is no exception.

In the early stage of my career, I worked for a small, retail insurance broker on New York’s Long Island, and the men in my company would attend the Risk and Insurance Management Society (RIMS) Conference every year.

I am sure they went there to learn about things other brokers were doing, make connections with insurance company executives, and workers’ comp service providers. But typically, these conferences allowed the participants to hang out with their buddies at the bar, and play a round or two of golf.

So I was mildly amused when I read an article posted today in The Workers’ Compensation Daily from Safety National Insurance Company, titled “It’s Time to Change Workers’ Compensation”.

The article discussed a recent meeting of the Harbor Health Systems 2015 MPN (Medical Provider Networks) Medical Directors, in which an executive from Sedgwick gave the keynote address. His address discussed the need for change in the approach to workers’ comp claims handling.

Harbor Health Systems is based in California, and through the writings of my fellow blogger, David De Paolo, and the personal experiences of two women I previously wrote about, “Ms. X” and “Ms. A”, the California workers’ comp system could use more than a keynote address to change the problems and abuses injured workers are receiving in that state.

FYI, Harbor Health Systems is a subsidiary of One Call Care Management, a company that for the past two years or so has been gobbling up smaller companies, especially in the pharmacy benefit management arena, as well as other smaller workers’ compensation service providers, and as Joe Paduda reported earlier this week, One Call Care Management has acquired an imaging company called MedFocus.

According to Joe, this acquisition consolidates One Call’s stranglehold on the market, so if this is the kind of change Mr. North of Sedgwick was referring to, then it is more of the same.

The article goes on to say that the role of a medical director is to be there to help injured workers to recover from their injuries and resume their lives. I believe “Ms. X” and “Ms. A” would beg to differ.

The article also goes on to say that for years, the workers’ comp medical networks have focused on two things: discount and proximity. They would send injured workers to the physician closest to the employer’s location who would agree to accept a discount on the treatment provided.

Over time, they realized this approach was flawed, and that they should identify the medical providers who produce the best outcomes and incentivize them to treat injured workers by compensating them fairly.

They are learning that when they find these superior physicians, they need to get out of their way and let them practice medicine. The rest of the article details how the industry needs to evolve in how they devote resources to claims, how to better explain the workers’ comp system and protections it provides, and to avail themselves of the opportunities the ACA provides to evolve the way medical care is delivered.

According to Mr. North, when it comes to change, there are three main categories of people:

  • Innovators – people who are truly creating change
  • Learners – people who take what innovators created and work to evolve it
  • Ignorers – people who are uncomfortable with change and have a tendency to ignore it as long as possible

He said that workers’ comp cannot evolve if they are unwilling to take risks and become innovators; otherwise change will not happen.

I agree with his analysis, and my posts have attested to that fact time and time again. Therefore using his categories, it is clear that I would be considered an innovator, since I have been advocating implementing medical travel into workers’ comp.

Workers’ comp needs to take risks, and medical travel affords them of one of those risks.

Yet, those who have derided my idea, or who have not paid any attention to what I am saying, are ignorers, and there may even be people who would see to it that medical travel never becomes part of workers’ comp.

So I would like to add a fourth category to this list. Call them defenders of the status quo, or preventers, or even saboteurs, if it ever got that far.

So what is this change Mr. North is talking about? Is it real change, or just change for the sake of change? And what does real change look like?

Real change is not keeping injured workers and the system locked in a padded cell, wrapped in a straitjacket.

Real change is not buying up smaller companies and cornering the market, so that the very idea of competition is tossed on the dustbin of history.

Real change is not doing the same things over and over again and expecting different results.

Real change is not being afraid to look outside of one’s comfort zone, and outside of one’s national borders at a time when your industry is facing challenges from the expansion of out-out legislation that threatens to destroy workers’ comp, rising medical costs, physician shortages, questions of the constitutionality of exclusive remedy, negative media reports, changes in technology and diversification, and other “seismic shifts”.

Real change is becoming a learner, and I am looking for learners to work with. Real change is being fearless and recognizing that Americans are not the only ones who are able to provide quality medical care.

Real change is going with the flow of change in the world today and joining the globalized world; otherwise you stagnate and die. Time is running out. Real change is possible, but you must go after it.

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I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com. Share this article, or leave a comment below.