Tag Archives: Adverse Events

Botched Beauty: The Dark Side of Medical Travel

Richard’s Note: The episode of The Doctors TV show mentioned below is not a complete episode. There are multiple videos on the website of the show. It will take some patience to watch them all. Sorry for the confusion.

While channel surfing, I came across the Fox program, The Doctors. They were investigating botched surgeries performed as part of a medical travel experience. One woman died as a result of an uncertified physician and facility; the other woman cannot have plastic surgery on her posterior again after a botched Brazilian butt lift.

The woman who died was the aunt of one of the audience members.

Here is the video of the episode that aired today. I suggest the industry leaders watch this.

https://www.thedoctorstv.com/episodes/doctors-investigate-botched-beauty-across-border-can-you-buy-better-body-another-country

All parties responsible for medical travel must do a better job of policing and cleaning up the industry. This cannot keep happening without anyone doing anything about it. That is why it is not seeing an increase in patients going overseas. It’s your fault, so take responsibility. CLEAN UP YOUR ACT.

“Extreme Makeover” Surgery Leads to Death

A story from the Australian network, ABC, tells of an Australian man who went to Malaysia for cosmetic surgery, and came back with holes in his body and died.

I am posting the link here:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-12-18/medical-tourism-mother-warns-of-risk-coroner-delivers-findings/9260626

We all know there are risks to any surgery, but in the case of medical travel, one or two bad outcomes can be serious to not only the brand of the facilitator, but to the entire industry,.

Rather than conducting conferences around the world where you pat each other on the back, why don’t you call one big meeting to set out some global standards of treatment and declare that you will drive those causing harm, both facilitators and providers, out of the industry.

Stand up and make this industry safe. And stop patting each other on the back with useless certificates and awards that have no meaning to real people.

Ensuring Patient Safety: Making Sure Medical Tourism Puts Its Money Where Its Mouth Is

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The medical tourism industry prides itself on the better quality of care found in hospitals in medical tourism destinations, but questions about just how good American hospitals are remain.

Insurance Thought Leadership.com published an article today called “The Most Dangerous Place In The World”, written by Leah Binder, President & CEO of The Leapfrog Group (Leapfrog), a national organization based in Washington, DC, representing employer purchasers of health care and calling for improvements in the safety and quality of the nation’s hospitals.

Her article describes the hospital stay of the father of a Harvard professor Ms. Binder knows in an American hospital that was anything but routine.

Here are some of the key takeaways from the article, and should give the medical tourism industry some solace, and some reason to make sure that their hospitals are better than those in the US:

    • American hospitals are “the most dangerous place in the world.”
    • The safety problem is an open secret among people in the health care industry. The statistics are staggering. Each year, one in four people admitted to a hospital suffer some form of harm, and more than 500 patients per day die.
    • We must have a better approach for tracking harm in the hospital, hospitals need to feel the financial consequences of providing unsafe care, and accountability for patient safety must be created.
    • Last year, The Leapfrog Group initiated an effort to rate the safety of 2,600 hospitals. The Hospital Safety Score is available to the public for free on a website and as an app.
    • A recent AARP Magazine article notes features used in safer hospitals that all of us should look for in our own hospital.

If the medical tourism industry is to remain viable and grow larger around the world, it is imperative that hospital administrators, patient advocates, providers, medical tourism facilitators, ministries of Health and other relevant government entities insist on not only reaching quality measures in the US, but beating them, and beating them by an overwhelming margin that makes medical tourism a sound alternative, not only for individual  or group health insurance patients, but for patients injured on the job and covered under workers’ compensation.