Category Archives: Telehealth

EHR Vendor to Benefit from CVS/Aetna Merger

An article here from Healthcare IT News.com discusses how a CVS partner, Epic Systems, will benefit from the merger between CVS and Aetna.

The article reports that this signals a new era in analytics, interoperability, and population health.

According to Healthcare IT News.com, CVS is the biggest pharmacy chain in the U.S. by a number of locations and prescription revenue, Aetna is the nation’s third-largest insurance company. Epic Systems, which was not a party to the merger, but has been a CVS partner since 2015, is the largest electronic health record vendor.

The deal, according to the article,  stands to have a transformative impact on how healthcare is delivered in this country. Data, and lots of it, given that CVS has 9,700 retail locations and more than 1,100 walk-in clinics nationwide, was clearly a huge driver for the deal.

Epic’s vice president of population health, Alan Hutchinson, said that by using Epic’s Care Everywhere and Share Everywhere interoperability tools, CVA and Aetna could provide the rest of the community with information and insights to improve care.

“What’s really interesting about working directly with payers, providers, and patients is the ‘gray space’ – the opportunity that exists between traditional sites of care and all of the other organizations that are involved in the patient’s healthcare experience,” Hutchison said.

David Anderson, a research associate at Duke University Margolis Center, said in a recent blog post, “I can think of using the CVS retail data as a population health monitoring service, I can think of using the over the counter sales data tied to individuals to fuel predictive models for future opioid issues, or arthritis flares, or pulmonary hospital admissions or one hundred other things,”

He went onto say, “So from my former point of view as an insurance data geek, this merger offers an incredibly rich vein of data that can be mined and minted.”

The fundamental aim of the merger, is the management of chronic diseases through patient engagement, telehealth, and remote monitoring.

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini said, “I think you have to think of it as keeping people away from the medical-industrial complex by offering better services in the home by meeting social determinants of health, which are big drivers of healthcare expenditures today, much bigger than people understand.”

Larry Merlo, CEO of CVS Health said the arrangement will enable the combined company to deliver services that many hospitals currently do not.

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Texas Passes Telehealth Law

Texas has passed a telehealth law, joining other states. This ties in with yesterday’s infographic.

Here are the details:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/lone-star-joins-rest-nation-texas-passes-new-law-ferrante?trk=v-feed&lipi=urn%3Ali%3Apage%3Ad_flagship3_feed%3B7SI2NNb46r4tG3kR22C5Ew%3D%3D

Infographic on Mobile Health

Here’s an infographic courtesy of URAC. What will this mean for workers’ comp, health care and medical travel?

Millennials and Mobile.png

Borderless Healthcare: A Model for the Future of Medical Care in Workers’ Comp

By now, many of you, my faithful, and not so faithful readers (and critics) have been aware of my strong interest and passion about implementing medical tourism into workers’ comp.

The critics have not silenced me, they have only made me more determined than ever to get the word out…MEDICAL CARE UNDER WORKERS’ COMP IN THE US WILL HAVE TO GLOBALIZE, OR ELSE IT WILL FAIL TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CARE AT LOWER COST AND AT EQUAL OR BETTER QUALITY THAN WHAT IS RECEIVED CURRENTLY.

I capitalized the above because in the three plus years I have been writing this blog, it takes a bit of shouting to get heard in this world.

To make the point I just shouted, I participated yesterday in a webinar on Bloomberg BNA.com produced by Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP/Manatt Jones Global Solutions.

For all of you political junkies out there, Charles Manatt was the Chairman of the Democratic Party from 1981 to 1985, in the first term of that has-been Hollywood actor the GOP shoved down our throats.

The webinar, “Healthcare without Borders: The Opportunities and Challenges of Medical Tourism”, was an almost ninety minute, four-part presentation given by two Managing Directors, a Partner, and a Medical Director of a Mexican hospital system.

The presenters were Jon Glaudemans, Managing Director of Manatt Health Solutions, Andrew Rudman, Managing Director of Manatt Jones Global Solutions, Linda Tiano, Partner with Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP, and Dr. Alfonso Vargas Rodriguez, Medical Director of Hospitales H+.

While the focus of the middle of the presentation dealt with conducting medical tourism in Mexico, the information presented by Mr. Glaudermans was concerned about the trends in healthcare that are pointing to greater demand for medical tourism, and are elaborated in the following graphic:

Megatrends

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

Here are the key points from Mr. Glaudemans’ presentation slides:

  • Consumers pay more and make more care decision, using social
    media/apps to acquire price/network data.
  • Providers take risk for population/patient/product outcomes, requiring new care models and contracts
  • Care monitoring and delivery move out of traditional settings, shifting the locus of/focus on patient loyalty
  • Providers and payers consolidate to manage costs and enhance power, fighting for CM (care management) space
  • States become more active regulators and purchasers, creating marketplace mosaics and more “experiments”
  • Data on health status and effectiveness become widely available, changing practice and payment patterns
  • Bigger datasets yield insights, informing personalized care and challenging price-setting and patient privacy
  • Employers’ role continues to erode, while exchange plans sharpen focus on multi-year patient loyalty
  • Digital natives’ and baby boomers’ interests coalesce, forcing focus on new ‘late-life/end-of-life’ care models
  • Visibility into global pricing and care models improves, requiring providers to justify value and pricing
  • Social determinants accepted as major cost driver, leading to increased focus on service integration

Naturally, many of these megatrends will not pertain to workers’ comp, but given the fact that comp sometimes follows the lead of healthcare, it is not out of the realm of possibility that some of these trends will be felt in medical care for workers’ comp.

Andrew Rudman’s presentation focused on what medical tourism is, and why Mexico is an ideal medical tourism destination for Americans. The main thrust of his presentation is the proximity to the US, the flight times between major American cities and those Mexican medical tourism destinations he focused on in the discussion.

Mr. Rudman also provided a cost comparison chart between US and Mexican costs of certain medical procedures, which is shown below.

Cost comparison 2012

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP/PROMEXICO

Dr. Rodriquez discussed how Mexican doctors become certified in their sub-specialties and how they get re-certified once they are certified by their respective boards. In addition, he showed slides about the various hospitals in the Hospitales H+ system, and for our purposes here, outlined the price differential for certain orthopedic surgeries at the various hospitals in their system versus that of the US.

Ortho surgery prices

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP/Hospitales H+

Lastly, Linda Tiano covered the legal issues of medical tourism, and those of you who have been reading this blog for three years, know that my original paper covered some of these issues, and I raised them in my presentation in Reynosa, Mexico in November 2014.

Here are the key points Linda made regarding medical tourism benefits.

Medical Tourism Benefits

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

3rd Party Facilitator

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

Liability issues

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

HIPAA

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

State Regs

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

At the end, I asked the question, “do you see the possibility of implementing medical tourism into workers’ comp, and what are the legal issues with that?” Ms. Tiano mentioned the state-specific laws regarding workers’ comp, and said that the workers’ comp industry is way behind health care, to which I heartily agreed.

So you can see from this brief, but thorough review of the presentation, that medical tourism is a serious research area for many interested parties. Yet, you guys in work comp refuse to see, hear or speak about the truth of what is happening around you. So here is another picture for you.

hear-no-evil-see-no-evil-speak-no-evil

This is the workers’ comp industry on the subject of global health care and medical tourism…three deaf, dumb and blind monkeys clinging to the same old statutes, laws and regulations that haven’t changed since the days of Taft and Wilson.

So when are you going to catch up to the rest of the world, and to the globalization of health care? In the 23rd century? When are you going to admit to yourselves that automation, new technology, the Internet of Things, telemedicine, etc., are going to make you guys OBSOLETE… to borrow a term from “The Twilight Zone”.

I have a vision for the future of medical care in workers’ comp. What you have is the same old, same old, and expecting different results. That’s not only crazy, that is doing a disservice to the people workers’ comp is supposed to be for, the claimant.

But suit yourselves…the dinosaurs are waiting to greet you.

 

 

 

Follow-up Visits After Surgery: Telehealth, Medical Travel and Workers’ Comp

One of the questions posed to me when I have discussed the idea of medical travel in workers’ comp is what to do with follow-up care.

In an article this week from Reuters, Andrew Seaman wrote that people may happily, and safely, forgo in-person doctors’ visits after surgery by opting instead for talking with their surgeons by phone or video. Seaman said this was the result of a small study of U.S. veterans.

The study, conducted by researchers in JAMA Surgery, said most patients preferred the virtual visits and that the doctors didn’t miss any infections that popped up after surgery.

Lead author Dr. Michael Vella, of Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville said, “These kinds of methods are really important in the climate we’re in now,”…”So I think anything you can do to save money, see more patients and improve access to care is really important.”

Vella and his colleagues also wrote that there is interest in so-called telehealth to increase access to healthcare while also decreasing the costs associated with traveling to office visits.

Past research has found that telehealth visits may be useful in the treatment of chronic conditions and after surgery, but less is known about patients preferences for these types of visits, they added.

The study team evaluated data collected over several months in 2014 from 23 veterans, Seaman reported, and all but one of them were men, who were seen three times after a simple operation that would require only a night or so in the hospital. One visit was via video, the second was via telephone and the third was an in-person office visit.

The researchers found that no post-operation infections were missed during the video or telephone visits.

Dr. Vella said, “The veterans were very good at describing their wounds,” … “There was one patient who thought they were having problems, we brought them into clinic and there was an infection.”

Overall, the study found that 69 percent of the participants said they preferred a telehealth visit over the traditional in-office visit. Those who preferred the telehealth visit tended to live farther away from the hospital than those who would rather come into the office.

“I think (the study) challenges the paradigm that we need to see all patients back for visits,” Vella said.

Dr. Vella cautioned that the study was small, and they could not say that telehealth visits won’t miss problems. The study also cannot assess how telehealth visits would work for patients who have undergone more complex surgeries, according to Dr. Vella.

An alternative opinion was given by Dr. Sherry Wren, who was not involved in the new study, and also cautioned that not all patient preferences will align with the telehealth model.

“There will be patients who want to be seen, be reassured and want a doctor to check something out,” said Wren, a professor of surgery at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System in California.

Still, she said, many patients will like the option.

“There is a subset of patient that it’s not going to be appropriate for, but I think it’s a great alternative for the vast majority of patients.”

Dr. Vella said future research showing the results of the real-world implementation of telehealth will provide more information on its safety.

“I think it’s just really important that people continue to look at it,” he said.

What does this mean?

It means that when medical travel is ever implemented into workers comp, and that day grows ever closer, after a patient goes home to his/her country, they will still be able to get follow up care from the surgeon who performed the surgery, without having to fly back to the medical travel destination several times.

Will it work for everyone? Both Drs. Vella and Wren indicated that there are people who will not want it, and that there are subsets of patients that it will not be appropriate for, but overall they were both very positive about the future of telehealth visits after surgery.

If it worked for American veterans, it can certainly work for injured workers covered under workers’ comp, Veterans, especially those from our two ill-designed, ill-planned, and ill-conceived wars in Iraq and Afghanistan certainly have wounds more serious than most injured workers would suffer as a result of a work-related injury.

The only thing that stands in the way of introducing telehealth into workers’ comp, with or without medical travel, is what is between the ears of the leaders and “so-called” experts in the industry who have thus far gone and done the same things over and over again, and expect different results.

And you know what that is? Crazy, stupid, ridiculous, without any credibility, and without any traction in logic, which, I suspect is where the stuff between their ears are in.

Telehealth’s impact on Workers’ Comp

The following post from Kimberly George, SVP, Senior Healthcare Advisor for Sedgwick, and one of my LinkedIn connections, echoes the post I wrote last year called,  The Doctor will see you now….Online.

http://blog.sedgwick.com/2014/04/08/how-will-telehealth-impact-workers-comp/

 

Five reasons virtual doctor visits might be better than in-person ones

This has tremendous potential for the medical tourism industry, because it will allow doctors overseas to communicate with US-based physicians and their patients before going abroad for medical care. There is one small problem, some states make it illegal to consult with a patient over the Internet after the patient goes home, and there are laws against doctors not being licensed in the states where the patient lives, as well as laws preventing foreign medical providers from doing certain procedures. It is imperative that these laws are changed before virtual doctor visits become more widespread.

virtual_doctor

In relatively few years, videoconferencing has advanced tremendously, from something that required expensive and complicated hardware setups to something most smartphone, tablet, and PC owners have easy access to. Using video for virtual visits in healthcare is a little more complicated — the connection has to be reliable and the service HIPAA compliant to protect patient medical information — but nonetheless virtual visits are gaining popularity as a new way to deliver healthcare.

Becky Wai, a spokesperson for online video service VSee, told MobiHealthNews on the sidelines of the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) meeting in Austin this week, that of the 900 million doctor visits that took place in the US in the last year, about 50 percent of them could have been done remotely.

Of course, virtual visits can’t do everything that a doctor can do in-person. But in the average primary care checkup, a patient sees a doctor…

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