Category Archives: NCCI

NCCI’s 2017 Data Educational Program: A Personal View

Many of you have probably read my blog and notice that I sometimes refer to an organization called the National Council on Compensation Insurance or NCCI.

Back in the mid 1990’s, I worked there briefly, and also did a stint with a software vendor company reporting data to NCCI and independent state bureaus for workers’ compensation claims and policy data.

One of my blog readers told me about this year’s conference held in West Palm Beach and that we could me there. He came down from North Carolina yesterday, but left after the last class.

The program began on Tuesday, but I attended sessions starting on Wednesday. These are the classes I took:

  • Unit Statistical Data Editing and Correction
  • Medical Data Call Validation
  • Medical Data Collection Tool
  • Introduction to Unit Statistical Data Reporting (refresher course for me)
  • DCI Data Validation and Quality Issues
  • WCSTAT (Unit) Data File Submission and Processing
  • Unit Statistical Data-Premium Rating Programs and Exposures
  • Unit Statistical Data-Loss and Claim Conditions

Most of the classes were two hours long, with a fifteen minute break in between.

The classes were given by two presenters who rotated during the sessions, so that you did not get just one person’s knowledge and experience.

The participants ranged in age, but many were considerably younger than your humble writer. I had missed the 2oth anniversary reception Tuesday evening, but this was not really a social event, so it did not matter.

The technology I saw displayed this week was a far cry from what I worked with back in the 90’s, and is all web-based and very easy to learn. My impression from the information presented in all classes was that NCCI is taking a more customer-friendly approach to workers’ comp data reporting, which was something I found lacking back in the 90’s.

I know there are still areas of contention with some aspects of NCCI’s ratemaking role, as someone recently pointed out on LinkedIn regarding higher premiums for certain classification codes that are forcing small businesses out of business, but that is the exception and not the rule.

Overall, I felt it was worth it to attend, and I have gained a better appreciation for data reporting.

 

Florida WC Rates to Rise

As reported Tuesday on Insurance Journal.com, the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) has proposed a nearly 20% increase in the combined average rate increase from 17.1 percent to 19.6 percent.

This rate increase is in response to the decisions in the Westphal and Castellanos cases from the Florida Supreme Court last month and in April.

The Westphal  decision has prompted NCCI to propose a 2.2 percent projected increase. The court reinstated the 260-week limitation on temporary total benefits, which was limit before the 1994 reform. The Castellanos decision has prompted NCCI to propose a 15 percent projected increase. And a 1.8 percent projected rate increase related to updates within the Florida Workers’ Compensation Health Care Provider Reimbursement Manual (HCPR Manual) per Senate Bill 1402. The manual became effective on July 1, 2016.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Comp Blog is now viewed all over the world in over 250 countries and political entities. I have published 300 articles and counting, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Average Medical Costs in Work Comp Leveling Off

Once again it is time to look at the average medical costs for lost-time claims in workers’ comp. as reported last week in the NCCI State of the Line Report at the 2016 Annual Issues Symposium.

Those of you who have read my White Paper, or have followed this blog for sometime, know that this is an annual meeting of industry people in Florida to look at what is happening in workers’ comp.

It is not a conspiracy meeting of insiders looking to harm injured workers, as one deranged individual has suggested. [Emphasis added]

But rather, it is one way in which insurance personnel can understand where the workers’ compensation insurance market is headed. And the word this year, from Joe Paduda’s reporting last week is “Transitioning”.

Workers’ comp is transitioning and what it is transitioning into has been discussed previously by both Joe and Peter Rousmaniere, and that I have described in earlier posts.

One aspect of this transitioning has to do with automation and the development of artificial intelligence that will make many current jobs obsolete [remember that Twilight Zone episode with Burgess Meredith and Fritz Weaver where the State declared them both ‘obsolote’?]

Another part of this transitioning relates to the so-called ‘gig economy’ of companies like Uber and Lyft, Airbnb, etc., as well as the move of some jobs to part-time from full-time status, whatever the reason given.

But let’s move on to the issue at hand, which is, what is the average medical cost for lost-time claims this year. As you will see in the first chart, the average medical cost for lost-time claim dropped 1% from 2014, where there had been an increase from 2013 of 3%.

Chart 1.

Avg Med Cost 2016

Unlike past charts, this year’s chart shows that there are two years of preliminary data, 2014 and 2014. Compare that to last year’s chart, found here, as well as the two previous years, 2014 and 2015.

In 2014, the average medical cost per lost-time claim was $28,800; in 2015, the average medical cost dropped a mere $300 to $28,500, not very significant, but perhaps signalling a leveling off. You will notice in my previous articles and in my White Paper that I included a trendline that always showed the cost increasing, but it is apparent by looking at this year’s chart that there seems to be a flattening occurring.

According to Kathy Antonello’s report, the two key takeaways are:

  •  Medical severity change has moderated in recent years
  • The 2015 average medical cost is 1% lower than the 2014 value

Another factor to consider is how much of the total claim cost does medical payments per claim represent. As shown in the second chart, medical costs have remained at 58% of total claim cost, with indemnity (lost wages) representing the rest.

Chart 2.

Ind Med Split

As you can see, medical costs have risen significantly since 1981. Another way to view the change in average medical cost and its apparent leveling off can be seen in the third chart.

Chart 3.

WC Ave Med Cost

Chart 3 indicates that the cumulative change in excess of medical care inflation from 1995 to 2015 has joined the cumulative change in average medical cost from 1995 to 2015p in leveling off.

What this means, according to Ms. Antonello, is that workers’ comp medical costs per claim have risen at a much faster pace than indemnity over the past thirty years, medical inflation has outpaced wage growth, medical lost-time severity has increased 214% since 1995, and the corresponding increase in medical lost-time severity over and above the increase in medical price inflation is 55%.

What this also indicates is that workers’ comp is changing, and many predict that in a few years, workers’ comp as we have known it will disappear. Then perhaps treating injuries to certain body parts as knees, backs, shoulders, etc., common to both workers’ comp and general health care won’t be separated into different silos, but rather paid for as one medical expense under an employer’s health plan or even a single payer plan.

Either way, medical travel, given the predicted shortages of physicians and nurses, may present itself as a viable alternative, and not be subjected to antiquated laws and statutes that restrict an injured worker from getting medical care wherever they want to. And if predictions about artificial intelligence and automation are correct, then it won’t really matter, since very few individuals will be hurt on the job in the future.

There is an old Chinese curse: “May you live in interesting times.”


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Blog is now viewed all over the world in 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Trends and Issues in Workers’ Comp for 2016

From the ‘What’s happening now in workers’ comp’ department comes two articles written earlier this month by Jacquelyn Connelly in Independent Agent magazine.

The first, written on February 1, talks about new health care trends driving change for workers’ comp. The second, written a week later, deals with the top three regulatory issues to watch for in workers’ comp in 2016.

Let’s start with the first article.

As Ms. Connelly writes, medical now represents on average, 60% of the benefit dollar paid to injured workers, according to Peter Burton, senior division executive for state relations at NCCI (National Council on Compensation Insurance).

Burton said that, “if you went back 25 years ago, it would have been about 40%,” and he went on to say that, “medical is the largest component in most states of the benefit given to injured workers. If you looked at the amount of legislative pricing requested of NCCI during last year, the majority of the requests were medical-related.”

In my White Paper, I cited that “medical costs in 2008 were 58% of all total claims.”

One explanation Ms. Connelly gives is rising and shifting medical costs.  According to Donna Urben, vice president and workers’ compensation product manager at Erie Insurance, “the rise in medical costs, we’ve all seen it on typical health plans and we’ve also seen it on workers’ comp.” She goes further to say that, “what helps with the control of the increase in medical costs are those states that actually are able to direct medical care.”

Some state workers’ comp laws state that injured workers must go to panel physician established by the employer for a timeframe that is mandated by state guidelines, according to Ms. Urben.

If the injured workers receives medical care that fits the injury,” says Ms. Urben, “that ultimately gets them back to pre-injury status and enables them to return to work more quickly,”…”this explains why in some states that permit direction of care, employers are able to see a reduction in the claim cost on the medical claims side, versus those states that don’t permit direction of care, employers see a greater volatility in the medical costs from a workers’ compensation claim.

Another reason given by Ms. Connelly for the rise of medical costs is the duration of treatment.

Medical costs could also transform under the ACA, says Yvonne Hobson, vice president of corporate underwriting at Amerisure, and could cause some cost-shifting in workers’ comp insurance, by authorizing the use of capitation models that designate a set amount for each enrolled plan member, regardless of whether they take medical during that time.

This is not the first time we have seen this issue of cost-shifting and the ACA come up, as I and others have written about it last year.

Hobson explains that, “there are some injuries, such as soft tissue injures or back or knee or shoulder pain, where the cause of the injury isn’t readily apparent if it happened on the job or outside of work.” There is some discretion on the part of the doctors, Ms. Hobson states, when determining if the injury is work-related or not.

On the other hand, Matt Lyon, of Foremost Insurance Group, cited some predictions that the ACA could reduce the frequency of “Monday morning claims”, where someone gets hurt on the weekend, they don’t have health insurance, and come into work on Monday and file a workers’ comp claim, Ms. Connelly writes.

Mr. Lyon noted that some preliminary studies suggest a slight correlation between the ACA and a decline in fraudulent comp claims.

Ms. Hobson concurs, and stated that, “the challenge with cost-shifting is that the research and the data on it is new, so only time is going to be able to tell us how it’s going to ultimately be impacting workers’ compensation costs.

The final trend, Ms. Connelly mentions is the misuse and abuse of opioids and medical marijuana. I have discussed the opioid abuse issue before, so I will not go into that here, and the other trend is medical marijuana, as well as recreational use.

States such as Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington have allowed recreational use, and 23 states and Washington, D.C. have legalized medical marijuana.

In her second article, Ms. Connelly identifies three regulatory issues. These issues are:

  1. Opt-out laws. Currently, as I have written about, opt-out is only in Texas and Oklahoma, but it was reported recently that the legislation in Tennessee has not passed this year, and maybe voted on again next year. Other states proposed for this legislation are Arkansas, North and South Carolina and West Virginia. The group behind the writing of this legislation is called “A-rock” (ARAWC).
  2. Reform efforts. Peter Burton, cited by Ms. Connelly in the last article, said that insurance agents need to be wary of the “attack on the exclusive remedy”. I have also written about this; yet, my research for this article has found that the ALEC (American Legislative Exchange Council), a right-wing, non-profit organization partly funded by the Castor and Pollux of right-wing, libertarianism, the Koch Brothers has drawn up a bill defending exclusive remedy, which I find puzzling, because I would have thought that they would want to let workers try to sue their employers, which is what happened before the enactment of workers’ comp laws.
  3. Independent contractor classification. The Department of Labor’s Administrator’s interpretation sought to classify most independent contractors as employees.

What does this mean?

For workers’ comp, it means that there are challenges ahead that the industry needs to be aware of, but it also means that business as usual will no longer suffice, nor will doing the same things over and over again, and expecting different results.

As we have seen in Ms. Connelly’s first article, medical costs are rising for workers’ comp claims. She does not mention whether or not this includes expensive surgeries, or is just confined to the immediate treatment of the injury and the subsequent process of returning the injured worker to their pre-injury state.

Some employers have seen reductions in medical costs, but overall, the medical costs keep rising, as evidenced by my White Paper that stated that in 2008, the percentage was 58%. Two percentage points in seven years.

Obviously, something or some things are not working. But as long as the industry ignores alternatives, as long as some people suggest that judges won’t order surgery out of the country (do doctors order executions, I wonder?), as long as these same individuals believe that no injured workers (especially Latino workers) will want to or will accept going abroad for surgery, and as long as the “old men” of the industry cling to xenophobia, racism and American Exceptionalism, holding back the workers’ compensation industry from joining the globalization of health care, comp included, then nothing will change, and costs will continue to rise.

Lastly, it is state laws themselves that need to be changed, modified or outright discarded so that employers across the country can realize huge cost savings in their medical claim costs, when their employees need surgery.

To say this will never happen is like saying Man will never fly, go to the Moon, or any of a thousand other “impossible” things we humans have accomplished. Are you saying that going to the Moon or flying is easier than going to another country to get surgery? Or are you just being xenophobic, racist, and delusional that American health care is the best?

You decide, but while you do, the meter is running on medical costs, and the other issues, such as opt-out, reform and job classification are making workers’ comp challenging now and for the future. But it does not have to be that way.

Challenges Facing Work Comp

In three weeks, members of the medical tourism industry will gather in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico to attend the 6th Mexico Medical Tourism Congress.

You may recall that I was invited and attended the Congress last year, and was invited again this year. However, due to personal and financial reasons, I am not attending this year.

I am however, posting my PowerPoint presentation below for your viewing, with narration by yours truly. I hope you find it interesting and informative.

Challenges Facing Workers’ Comp (PowerPoint)

Challenges Facing Workers’ Comp (video)

 

Turbulence Ahead for Workers’ Comp Market

There may be turbulence ahead for the workers’ comp market, according to an article today on PropertyCasulty360.

The article, by Nancy Grover, says that the market can be characterized as stable, but that there are changes in the nation’s workforce, as well as technological advances, that threaten the balance of the industry. (see “Workers’ Comp Besieged: Independent Views of the Problems Workers’ Comp is Facing” and “Workers’ Comp at a Crossroads: Where Does it Go from Here?“)

Grover states that the industry’s financial outlook is positive, but that the NCCI State of the Line report earlier this year, warned that there was “calm now, but turbulence ahead”.

I will have more to say on the challenges facing workers’ compensation when I publish my second presentation slides that I may present in Mexico this December.

Among some of the challenges, Grover reports the industry is facing are increased medical costs (I have written extensively about this as well), threats to their security systems, and the changing nature of the workforce (another issue I have mentioned before, especially with regard to immigration and medical travel in the Western hemisphere).

According to one industry source she cites, medical costs are the number one cost driver (see “Lost-Time Medical Costs Approaching $30K: When Will You See the Light?“).

NCCI found that the average medical cost per lost time claim grew by 4% in 2014, which was an increase from the previous three years, where the average medical cost rose between 2 – 3%, Grover said.

Drug prices are also a cost driver, according to Joe Paduda (see “Drug Costs Make Up Bulk of Work Comp Medical Costs [Infographic]“).

“The other thing happening is facility costs for hospitals and healthcare systems are going up at or near double-digit rates for many payers and not many are paying attention”, according to Joe.(see “Outpatient Facility Costs Rising Could Benefit Medical Tourism Industry“)

There are also market threats, Grover writes, such as the “on demand” economy with companies like Uber. Lyft and others raising questions for workers’ comp industry personnel.

Unfortunately, Grover does not offer alternative solutions other than those that are being tried, and have been tried, with little or no success.

One such “solution” is medical provider networks, to closely contain costs by managing care for injured workers, but as she points out, they have not proven effective among all states.

Here is what  some in the industry really looks like to this reporter:

hear-no-evil-see-no-evil-speak-no-evil

They keep saying and doing the same things over and over again, and costs continue to rise, challenges are rushing headlong towards them, opt-out expansion threatens to destroy workers’ comp altogether, but they are deaf, dumb and blind to reality and to alternatives. One wonders if they really are like these three. They just act upon instinct and don’t have a grasp of the changes around them outside of their little space.

Oh well, evolution works in strange ways, so there is hope.

Don’t Take My Word for It

From the ‘Better Late than Never’ department comes this article written last month from one of my LinkedIn connections, Paul Binsfeld, Founder & CEO, Company Nurse, a telephonic triage injury hotline, headquartered in Scottsdale, AZ.

According to Paul, nationwide, of all dollars spent on medical costs, approximately 60% are spent on workers’ compensation benefits associated with workplace injuries, and approximately 40% are spent on disability.

The National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) has found that medical costs per lost time claim have increased 56.5% over the past ten years, rom $18,400 per claim in 2003, to $28,800 in 2013. (see my articles, “Average Medical Claim Costs Still Rising for Workers’ Compensation”, “Average Medical Claim Costs Still Rising for Workers’ Compensation: 2014 Edition”, and “Lost-Time Medical Costs Approaching $30K: When Will You See the Light?”)

Paul also said that since medical costs are a significant cost driver to workers’ compensation benefits, many employers are taking steps to pro-actively manage the medical resources they use for their injured workers.

The rest of his article discusses the average costs of retail clinics, urgent care centers, and emergency rooms, and then highlights what his company can do for employers.

Nothing wrong with that. That is the business he is in, and he is marketing his business to potential clients.

But he does not address the very issue that this writer has been discussing for nearly three years now; how to get lower cost surgery for injuries common to workers’ comp?

Of course, I don’t expect him to, but you should. Because to not do so only makes the costs of workers’ comp more expensive, even if you find ways to pay less for immediate care. It’s when the meter starts running up if surgery is warranted that employers need to find alternatives for.

It’s up to you. Pay more here, or pay less somewhere else. Just don’t take my word for it.

————————————————————————————————————————————-

I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com. Share this article, or leave a comment below.