Category Archives: Mexico

S**thole Countries and Medical Travel

The comment yesterday that the current occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue said, is not only revolting, disgusting, sick and racist. It is also a threat to the national security of the United States, and to the economic health of the nation, and of the medical travel industry.

A host on the Fox News network defended what was said Thursday by saying that this is how forgotten men and women talk. If by “forgotten men and women” he means the men and women who lost their jobs because their wealthy bosses sent their jobs overseas or they were lost due to automation, then they only have to blame themselves for voting against their economic interests, and not the immigrants they blame for losing their jobs.

As to what this means for medical travel, think carefully about who travels from the US to other countries like India, Thailand, Singapore, Costa Rica, Mexico, and others, and not to mention those countries he did mention as “s**tholes”, especially in Africa, the Caribbean, and the Middle East (a region he did not mention yesterday, but has singled out for a Muslim ban).

And consider also what this means for inbound medical travel from those continents and countries that American hospitals might want to attract. Would you, as a citizen of those countries, travel to the US if that was what the leader of the US thought about you and your country? I don’t think so.

The notion that we should take in people from Norway (not that there is anything wrong with Norwegians, in fact, I am watching a series on early Norwegian history, Vikings on the cable channel History) is proof that he is a racist and a white supremacist.

Comments on social media have even gone so far as to indicate that Norwegians would never consider moving to the US because they have a better standard of living and have free education, health care, and rank higher on all social metrics.

So, those of you in the medical travel industry should be aware that some of the resistance to medical travel from America, and from the very people who would benefit greatly from it, are the forgotten men and women the Fox host mentioned. If so, it will be a tough sell to get them over there.

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Cross-Border Medical Travel in Tucson

Happy Holidays to all!

Hope you all had a good holiday.

Here is an article from Fierce Healthcare.com that describes what actions the city of Tucson, Arizona is taking to become a medical travel destination.

Readers of this blog will recall a few past posts that discussed cross-border medical travel, albeit due to an on-the-job injury. The article, NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View, discussed a Workers’ Comp claim in Arizona when a Mexican truck driver was thrown from his cab, received medical care first in Mexico, then in Arizona, as the state had changed their laws, and he was able to file a second claim.

A follow-up article, NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View: Update, reported the continued status of the driver’s claim.

Several other posts discussed cross-border medical travel into California, and into Mexico.

Here is the article in its entirety:

 

Tucson aims to become medical tourism mecca
by Ilene MacDonald | Apr 10, 2017 11:36pm
Tucson, Arizona, is on a mission to become a healthcare and wellness destination for international visitors, particularly Mexican families with enough disposable income to pay for medical care in the United States.

The Tucson Health Association—which includes Banner Health, the Carondelet Health Network, Northwest Medical Center and Tucson Medical Center—hopes to entice tourists to come to the city for elective, nonemergency services, such as total knee replacements, the Arizona Daily Star reports.

Although some Mexican insurers will pay for certain procedures in the U.S., Felipe Garcia, executive vice president of Visit Tucson, which is also a member of the association, expects most visitors will likely pay out-of-pocket for the procedures.

“If your patient needs a certain procedure we have in the U.S., we’ll take care of it in Tucson, do the surgery and then we’ll send the patient back to Mexico where the provider there can take the next step with recovery,” Garcia said.

Tucson hospitals are hoping their efforts will be as successful as Texas Medical Center in Houston, a group of nonprofit health providers that includes MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Texas Children’s Hospital. Those provider attract 15,000 medical tourists a year, according to the article.

Medical tourism has become a lucrative business, for both healthcare providers and the local community, as visitors usually have extended stays in hotels and leased apartments, according to the article. Josef Woodman, CEO of the North Carolina-based Patients Beyond Borders, told the publication that approximately 250,000 medical tourists come to the U.S. for treatment each year and spend as much as $40,000 per patient.

To attract Mexican patients, Visit Tucson intends to develop a website in Spanish and hire a concierge to help patients connect with medical care in Tucson and navigate the healthcare system. It plans to market heavily to those who live in the Northern Mexico area due to geographical proximity. Eventually the association plans to market medical services to Canadian citizens.

 

Here is the link: https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/tucson-aims-to-become-medical-tourism-mecca-for-mexican-patients

An Open Letter to the Medical Tourism Industry

Dear Medical Tourism Industry,

I am writing you all to address some issues I am having with the industry on the occasion of my having past my five year anniversary writing this blog, and nearing another milestone, that of publishing 400 articles. At present, I am at 396.

For the past few weeks, I have noticed on the social media site, LinkedIn that some of my connections in the industry have been attending conferences around the world, and more recently, I have replied that I wished I was there and posted a recent post with the message to advertise my willingness to collaborate, or attend such conferences.

With the exception of one person this evening, not one person has responded positively, nor in the past five years has anyone other than one person invited me to speak at a conference, and that was three years ago in Mexico. The other two conferences I attended were here in Florida; one in Miami Beach, the other in Hollywood, Florida. The first in 2014, the second in 2012, and was the reason why I started writing my blog three days after it ended.

My intention then, as now, was to transition into a new career path, so that I could be employed and enjoy the things other people enjoy, and see the world before I am unable to. But In the past five years, while I have connected with practically all the major players in the industry, defended the industry in numerous posts, and even been critical of the industry at times; no one, not here in the US, nor anyone in Latin America or the Caribbean has invited me to a conference or a fam tour, nor to any other part of the world that is not part of some current conflict.

Recently, an American filmmaker had the premier of her film on medical travel on American television, on what we call the “Public Broadcasting System”. or PBS. I missed most of it, but was able to see two names in the credits that I recognized. One person I met in Miami Beach in 2014,  the other I am connected with on LinkedIn, but have never met. I tried to contact the filmmaker, but when she did not respond, I contacted my connection, who told me she was leery about responding because I had had an association with an organization we all know, but do not like that purports to represent the industry. He had to tell her that I am legitimate.

Folks, after five years of writing, and six, almost seven, of researching the industry, and being viewed on every major continent, you would think that many of you would know that I am honest, sincere, and definitely a legitimate advocate for medical travel.

Last week, I discovered that there was a conference in Dusseldorf, Germany, and today, I learned that one of my other connections, who I did meet in Reynosa in 2014. was invited to a conference in China. What does it take to be taken seriously and given the respect and courtesy of being invited to attend these functions after all this time?

I began my work in 2011. This coming March will be seven years since I wrote my White Paper. The paper is on my blog. My articles, even those covering Workers’ Comp and Health Care have not generated many views on a daily basis, save for a few here and there. I admit, they all cannot be prize winners, but at least I am persistent. Yet, I am not making headway with the industry, nor am I getting any compensation for writing,

I don’t want to sound like I am complaining, but I feel that after all this time, it is wrong for me to be ignored. I have committed long hours of my time and my life to this industry, even as my health over the summer was an issue. I am not out of the woods yet, but I am doing ok, and with the proper treatment, and eventual surgery, I should be healthy in the future, and can travel until such time, as long as I have more than two weeks notice.

In the beginning of my blog writing, I added a section where I asked readers to tell me where they are from and who they were. No one responded, so I stopped the practice. I still would like to hear from you, but after reading this letter, I hope you will do more than just dropping me a note.

I am waiting to meet you and to participate in future conferences.

Sincerely,

Richard Krasner, MA, MHA

Map shows countries to date where my blog has been viewed.

Ashley Furniture and Medical Travel, part 2

As promised last month, here is the Spotlight article from Medical Travel Today.com about Ashley Furniture’s foray into Medical Travel for their employees.

In case you missed it, here is the link to part 1 of the article.

Time For Medical Tourism Industry to Clean Up Its Act

An article in Arizona Central (see link below) highlights the problem with weight-loss surgery in Mexico.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/money/business/health/2017/11/16/mexico-gastric-sleeve-weight-loss-surgery-deaths-arizona-medical-tourism-risks/576309001/

This isn’t the first article on this subject, and won’t be the last, but the industry must clean up its act, stop patting yourselves on the back at all these fancy conferences around the world, come together to lay down guidelines and industry-driven protocols and standards of care and legal protections, and lastly, get rid of the crooks (you know who they and you are), charlatans, con men, and carnival barkers who promote medical travel, and give it a black eye.

Naturally, there are risks to any surgery, no matter where it occurs, but if medical travel is to be marketed as less costly, with better outcomes, the quacks and thieves must be removed from the industry.

Stop dissing each other, start cooperating with each other, and cut back on the conferences. Nobody of any real importance to the growth of the industry attends; only those who talk a great deal or are promoting their own businesses.

Here is a video that goes along with the article.

https://uw-media.azcentral.com/video/embed/106607688?placement=embed

 

 

Ashley Furniture and Medical Travel, part 1

From the One Hand Washes the Other department comes the following Spotlight article from Medical Travel Today.com.

Ashley Furniture, based in Wisconsin, is one of the largest manufacturers of home furnishings in the world.

I met Rajesh Rao in 2014 when I attended the Costa Rican Medical Travel Summit in Miami Beach. Rajesh’s company was also instrumental in convincing another furniture manufacturer, HSM in North Carolina, to first send patients to India, then to Costa Rica for medical care. I have written about this in previous posts.

This article is part one, and part two will run next month.

Cross-Border Dental Care in Mexico

On Sunday, NBC Nightly News ran a video report on dental care in Los Algodones, Mexico, south of the border from Arizona, and west of Yuma.

According to the report, during the winter months, up to 7,000 Americans travel to Los Algodones for dental care.

Los Algodones, also known as “Molar City”, is the self-proclaimed dental capital of the world. While that sounds like hype, I can tell you from personal experience that it is not the only town on the border where one can find dozens of dental offices.

When I presented at the 5th Mexico Medical Tourism and Wellness Business Summit in 2014, I visited a town east of Reynosa called Nuevo Progresso where I saw some of the dental offices, along with some of the other attendees.

Here is the video from NBC.

http://www.nbcnews.com/widget/video-embed/1018704963518

And here are some pictures from Nuevo Progresso.

I took these pictures in a small medical center on the main street of Nuevo Progresso, just over the border from Texas. To the left of the picture on the left, is the bridge crossing the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo) into the US.

And the people I saw on the street were not Mexicans, they were Americans.

Still think medical travel is a stupid and ridiculous idea? Try telling it to the thousands who go across the border.