Category Archives: Medicaid

Arkansas drops 3,815 more Medicaid enrollees over work requirement – Modern Healthcare

Modern Healthcare reported yesterday that the State of Arkansas dropped almost 4,000 of its citizens from the Medicaid expansion because of failure to comply with work requirements the state enacted months ago.

The following summary and link is provided:

Nearly 4,000 Arkansans lost their Medicaid expansion coverage in October because they didn’t comply with the state’s new work requirement. Another 8,462 low-income adults lost benefits in the previous two months.

Source: Arkansas drops 3,815 more Medicaid enrollees over work requirement – Modern Healthcare

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Midterm Mashup

Well, the 2018 Midterm elections are over, and the analysis is beginning as to what this all means.

For those who wanted to send a message to the Russian puppet in Washington, the election meant that the House of Representatives will be controlled for the next two years starting in January by the Democrats.

For the Republicans, it means a greater control of the Senate, with at least one race, the one in my current state of Florida undecided and headed for a recount, as per state law.

However, there were many defeats for the party of Obama, Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter, LBJ. JFK, Truman and FDR. Andrew Gillum lost to a nobody for governor of Florida who is connected to the Orangutan by an umbilical cord. Beto O’Rourke made a valiant, if futile effort against the worse person to hold a Senate seat, Lyin’ Ted Cruz. And a few Democratic senators lost seats in Indiana, Missouri and North Dakota.

But as far as health care is concerned, the change in the leadership of the House of Representatives means that the ACA is safe for another two years. and Medicare and Medicaid will not be cut, as the Senate Majority Leader has indicated he wanted to do.

Medicaid, in particular, came out of the Midterms a little better than expected before the election, as the following posts from Healthcare Dive, Joe Paduda, and Health Affairs reported this morning.

First up, Healthcare Dive, who reported that Red states say ‘yes’ to Medicaid . Idaho, Utah, and Nebraska said yes to expansion; Montana said no.

Joe Paduda echoed that in his post, “And the big winner of the 2018 Midterms is…Medicaid“. However, Joe stated that results in Montana were not final; yet, they had decided to expand Medicaid two years ago, but the vote was temporary, and yesterday’s vote was to make it permanent.

And lastly, Health Affairs reported in “What the 2018 Midterm Elections Means for Health Care” that besides blocking repeal of the ACA, Democrats may tackle drug prices, preexisting conditions protections, Opioids, Medicare for All, Surprise bills (unexpected charges from a hospital visit). regulatory oversight, extenders such as MACRA, Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) payments, and Medicaid expansion, especially since gubernatorial wins in Maine, Kansas, and Wisconsin will make expansion more likely in those states.

Critics pounce as CMS gives states more leeway to skirt ACA | Healthcare Dive

Slowly, but surely, we are moving inexorably towards the adoption of single payer healthcare, even though the current regime and the medical-industrial complex is doubling or tripling down on a free-market, for-profit health care system that will split into two classes – those who can afford it, and those who cannot.

So, it is no surprise that the people in charge of the US health care system are systematically dismantling the ACA, and pushing dubious, short-term limited plans that do nothing but line the pockets of the corporate health insurance sector. Appointments such as Mary Mayhew, the former DHHS Commissioner from Maine, and an aide to Governor Paul Le Page, as deputy administrator and director of Medicaid and CHIP, is symbolic of how the regime is attempting to roll back health care for Americans, and now that work requirements are being implemented, is throwing thousands off of rolls in some states.

The following from Healthcare Dive is instructive of this blatant attempt at destroying health care for millions of Americans who never had it, or couldn’t afford to pay large premiums.

Here is the article:

New guidance on 1332 Medicaid waivers makes it easier for states to use association and short-term health plans that limit coverage for pre-existing conditions.

Source: Critics pounce as CMS gives states more leeway to skirt ACA | Healthcare Dive

Nation’s First Medicaid Work Requirement Sheds Thousands From Rolls In Arkansas

Last month, you may recall, I posted an article about Medicaid work requirements in Arkansas from an article in Health Affairs.

Today, Health Affairs posted a follow-up article that reported that thousands are being shed from the Medicaid rolls in Arkansas.

According to the article, the Arkansas Department of Human Services officials announced on Sept. 12 that 4,353 people who were enrolled in the state’s Medicaid expansion program had been locked out of coverage for failing to comply with the work requirement for three months.

The agency has said those people will have until October 5 to apply for a good cause exemption if they were unable to access an online reporting portal because of network server issues that affected it and other agencies.

Source: Nation’s First Medicaid Work Requirement Sheds Thousands From Rolls In Arkansas

Michigan threatens to repeal Medicaid expansion if work requirements not approved | Healthcare Dive

Note: One more state is attempting to include work requirements for Medicaid recipients, as previously posted in Arkansas Medicaid Work Requirement Failing Out of the Gate.

 

Two JAMA studies bolster critics of work requirements who say most Medicaid recipients who are able to work are already doing so, and tracking compliance will heap more administrative burden onto an already-taxed system.

Source: Michigan threatens to repeal Medicaid expansion if work requirements not approved | Healthcare Dive

Arkansas Medicaid Work Requirement Failing Out of the Gate

Health Affairs blog published an article recently about the early experience of Medicaid recipients in Arkansas after that state implemented a work requirement in June.

Last month, I wrote an article that reported that work requirements for Medicaid worsen health.

The author of the Health Affairs article, Dr. Jessica Greene, is a Professor and the Luciano Chair of Health Care Policy at Baruch College, City University of New York. She conducted in-depth interviews with 18 adult Medicaid recipients in northeast Arkansas in mid-August.

Dr. Greene admits that the interviews are too small a group to provide generalizable results, the interviews do illustrate how the state’s policy is interacting with the day-to-day lives of Medicaid recipients to produce serious potential consequences that have little to do with policy’s stated objectives.

She outlined the results of her interviews as follows:

Lack Of Awareness

Two thirds of the Medicaid recipients (12/18) I interviewed had not heard anything about the new work requirement. “First time I’ve ever heard anything [about it],” a 31-year old man, who had started a vocational training program the day we spoke, said. “You’d think it’d be on the news or something. I ain’t seen it on the news, and I watch Channel 8 news every night.”

At Risk Of Losing Coverage

Of the nine people who, based on their age, should have received a DHS letter letting them know they were subject to the work requirement, four said they had received a letter. Two said the letters indicated they were exempt because they already met the SNAP work requirement.

The other two were at risk for losing Medicaid coverage. One, a 47-year old woman, said she had received her letter about three months earlier; she believed, incorrectly, that she had three months to report her hours. When I asked her if reporting her hours was an obstacle, she said she was struggling with very stressful life issues, including a mentally ill sister, and as a result the work requirement had not received much of her attention. The other person, a 40-year-old woman, described being overwhelmed by receiving the letter: “Basically… I’m like, okay, I’ve got this letter. I file it and I don’t know what to do with it…”

The other five who should have received a work requirement letter were either not sure if the letter arrived or thought it had not. When asked about receiving a DHS letter, a 42-year-old woman said, “I don’t know, I’m going to have to check and make sure [I didn’t receive the letter], because I need my Medicaid card for my sugar pill and my blood pressure pills.” A 46-year-old man, who had recently completed an inpatient drug treatment program, kicking a multi-decade drug addiction, wasn’t sure either. “I may have [received the letter]…I’m horrible about opening mail….I probably throw’d it away.” While the three others did not believe they received the letter, they were all exempt by either working and/or having children in the home, but likely needed to report their hours and exemptions in the portal to maintain Medicaid coverage.

Policy Not Sparking Work-Related Changes

Of the nine participants who were likely subject to the policy, only two were not meeting the 80 hour work-related activity requirement and did not seem to qualify for an exemption. Both told me that they were actively seeking work, and that the work requirement had not at all impacted their job seeking. In addition, those I interviewed between the ages of 19-29, who will be subject to the policy in 2019, either worked, went to school, and/or had children under 18 years old in the home. No one I spoke with reported that the policy had or would spark them to change their work-related activities.

Online Portal Challenging For Many

Participants described a very wide range of computer and online skills and access. Approximately a third said that reporting hours on the online portal would not be possible for them: “I can’t do that. I don’t have a phone. I don’t have a computer.”

Several, who were confident of their own skills, mentioned family members who would struggle. “Half my family probably doesn’t have a smart phone….A lot of people here don’t have internet still,” a 19-year old woman explained.

Mixed Attitudes About Linking Medicaid And Work-Related Activities

Almost all the participants believed that people who could work should be working. “I believe if you are able to work and you want the extra help that Medicaid gives, then you should work,” said a 28-year old woman who was currently working and has young children. But several expressed concern about those who had mental or physical conditions that would prevent them from meeting the requirement. One man raised questions about people who were “borderline” who were not officially considered disabled but still had serious health conditions. A 42-year-old woman, who works with people with disabilities said, “I think it’ll do more harm than good…. What they supposed to do, just get cut off Medicaid because they can’t meet those requirements?”

Others raised concerns about transportation needed to get to work and volunteering. “Some people don’t have vehicles, and sometimes it’s not necessarily their fault. Sometimes something happens and they lose their money… It’s not fair,” said a 21-year old recipient who is a college student. When I asked a woman who was looking for work whether she had tried to get help from the Department of Workforce Services, she said that she couldn’t get there because it was 30 miles away and there is no public transportation.

Not Going To Lift People Out Of Poverty

Participants were very skeptical about the Governor’s claim that the work requirement policy would help them out of poverty, as many were already working and still struggling financially.

One participant argued that the policy was not about getting people to work at all, but about reducing the number of Medicaid recipients: “It seems like a ploy for the state to save money. That’s all it is. It’s nothing about trying to get people back to work…”

Summing Up

Of the people I interviewed who were at risk of losing Medicaid coverage as a result of the work requirement, most were at risk because they lacked awareness of the policy or were overwhelmed by it, rather than because they were not meeting the 80 hours a month of work-related activities or the terms of an exemption. If this is true more broadly, the state will be ending people’s health coverage for the wrong reasons, adding credence to those who argue this policy is about reducing the rolls, rather than supporting people to get employment.

A 38-year-old woman who recently had to quit her job to get her niece, who she mothers, a birth certificate and other paperwork to start school argued that the policy does not take into account the complex lives of low-income people. “You are saying this should be possible, but you don’t know my circumstances. You haven’t been here,” she explained.

Given this limited, but anecdotal survey of the experience of 18 Medicaid recipients, it is clear that this idea is not rooted in any realistic and scientific study of how work requirements will affect Medicaid recipients, but rather is another way of getting people off the roles and moving towards eliminating Medicaid altogether, which is precisely what the Republican Party has been trying to do for decades. The war on the poor continues.

 

Free Medical School Tuition Could Solve Physician Shortage

Earlier this week, Elizabeth Rosenthal , former correspondent of the New York Times, and now the editor in chief of Kaiser Health News, wrote an opinion piece in response to the announcement by New York University’s School of Medicine’s decision to eliminate tuition for all current and future medical students.

Rosenthal, an emergency room doctor who became a journalist, stated that the goal of the free tuition was to eliminate a financial barrier for medical school applicants, and to address a crucial imbalance in the country’s physician work force.

She indicated that research had proven that the burden of medical school debt discourages doctors from going into practices that are poorly paid, such as primary care, or working in places where many patients are on Medicaid.

Rosenthal notes that there is a shortage of doctors working in these areas. Readers will recall that I have posted several articles on the predicted physician shortage. Those articles suggested medical travel could be an alternative solution in workers’ comp cases.

Even though the US has about the same number of doctors for our population as does Canada, Britain, and Japan, Rosenthal noted — American doctors are more likely to be paid more in subspecialties such as orthopedic surgery, rather than primary care.

Rosenthal cites N.Y.U.’s Law School when she points out that the medical school got it wrong as having a better solution.

Instead of making medical school free for everyone, Rosenthal states, N.Y.U., and all medical schools, should waive tuition for those students who commit to work where they are needed most.

The law school is a model and has a program that attracts the best and brightest to the low-wage corners of the legal profession. Students who commit to a career in public service, pay no tuition; those who go to corporate law pay the full amount.

Rosenthal recommends that medical schools should commit to so that students entering medical school, and who are not sure of their path, is to forgive or paying back the loans of doctors who go into lower-paying fields or set up a practice in underserved areas.

The government, she writes, could demand a system from academic medical centers as a precondition for receiving subsidies and payments.

Also, if a doctor chooses to deliver babies in rural Oklahoma or practice pediatrics in the South Side of Chicago, they should keep their salary.

The government, military, and some states already subsidize tuition, or pay back loans in exchange for limited-time service commitments, as my younger brother did when he graduated medical school.

The real goal, Rosenthal says, is to enable and support young doctors who feel that medicine is a calling, not as we know it today — as a means to get to the top 1 percent.

As the idea for free tuition for public colleges and universities is debated, doing so for medical school will alleviate the predicted physician shortage, allow more lower income minority students to attend without debt hanging over them when they graduate, and will improve the health of those in underserved and poorer neighborhoods.

That will likely impact the overall cost of health care as more people can see a doctor in their neighborhood, and not in an emergency room.

P.S. I am a graduate of N.Y.U.’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and took out loans that were paid back more than ten years later. Perhaps one day, that will also be a thing of the past.