Category Archives: managed care

Follow-up to Employee/Employer Choice: Three Years Later

Not that long ago, Michael Grabell of ProPublica, and Howard Berkes of NPR, published a report called “The Demolition of Workers’ Compensation”.

There was much industry condemnation about the report, and my fellow blogger, Joe Paduda, tried to set the record straight, but got nowhere.

I managed to write to Michael and corrected him on the issue of choice of treating physician, which I covered in these two articles: “Employee vs Employer Choice of Physician: How best to Incorporate Medical Tourism into Workers’ Compensation” and “Employee vs. Employer Choice of Physician Revisited: Additional Commentary on How Best to Incorporate Medical Tourism into Workers’ Compensation“.

I sent Michael all of my research and I think he was convinced that employees had more choice, it was just a matter of what options they had, given each state’s workers’ comp laws.

One of the sources I used back then, and today was a joint publication between the WCRI and the IAIABC,”Workers’ Compensation Laws As of January 1, 2016”, which can be purchased here.

Here is my version of their Table 3:

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Notes: * Employee may seek reasonable care on his or her own at employer’s expense
** Can allow worker to select then other party may choose to direct it for next 60 days
*** Employee for non-network claims, any willing provider; network claims, from list by network
**** Employer may have on-site medical provider that employees must see first, then employee can select

But as you will notice, the far left column has the most number of states where the employees can choose their treating physicians, although some do have certain circumstances where the employer has the choice, or there are conditions that must be met.

Relying on the US Chamber of Commerce, as Michael told me he did, does not get you the right data. Using the statutes and laws themselves is the only way to know what is permitted and what is not permitted. And the employee for the most part, does have a say in his or her care.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Blog is now viewed all over the world in 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

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Fourteen Hundred Plus Pages – For One Rule???

Health Affairs blog author, Sara Rosenbaum wrote an article today about the final rule for Medicaid that was released back on April 25th.

What immediately jumped out at me was the length of the rule — 1,452 pages. That’s right, fourteen hundred and fifty-two pages for one lousy rule.

Those of you who read my post from last Friday, “A Simple Friday Morning Health Care Philippic – (With Apologies to Simon & Garfunkle)”, will remember that I called our health care system, “more complex, confusing, bureaucratic, wasteful, idiotic, and expensive.”

I also said that it “is so top-heavy, so convoluted, and so complex that the sheer weight of its rules, regulations, laws, programs and models will cause it to collapse.”

At fourteen hundred and fifty-two pages, that is a lot of weight. Added to all the other rules, regulations, models, programs and whatnot, you’d need a forklift just to put it into a law library, or at best, have it craned in before the roof goes on.

I know War and Peace is a big slog through, but we are talking about health care here, not a fictionalized account of the Napoleonic Wars.

DOES ANYBODY ELSE THINK THAT 1,425 PAGES FOR ONE RULE IS OVERKILL? AND WHY IS THAT NECESSARY? CAN’T WE HAVE A SIMPLE, SHORT FINAL RULE THAT DOES NOT QUALIFY AS ‘GYM EQUIPMENT’?

If you don’t know why our health care system is so bad, one look at this bound rule will convince you that we have gotten out of hand with something that should be basic and simple…providing every American access to health care, and not lining the pockets of paper makers, ink makers, book printers, binders and the poor schlub who has to carry these rules to wherever these things are held.

And we are also lining the pockets of physicians, lawyers and other stakeholders whose grubby little hands (must be relatives of Trump) are in every nook and cranny of the system.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Blog is now viewed all over the world in 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.