Category Archives: Life Expectancy

These are the world’s healthiest nations | World Economic Forum

Some statistics about the world’s healthiest nations, according to the World Economic Forum. You will notice that the first time the US is mentioned, is when we are listed as the nation with the most expensive health care.

Imagine if we actually had a “free market”, competitive system where providers of health care services could and would charge anything they wanted because there was no one to stop them? Actually, that is what drives the cost of drugs.

And you will see in the first chart, that many of the nations listed have some form of universal, single payer health care, where everyone is covered, and costs are lower, and have better outcomes.

While no males in every region shown in the second chart has a higher life expectancy, which is understood, since females live longer than males, females in Europe have the longest life expectancy, no doubt due to the better outcomes of their single payer systems.

And finally, in the fourth chart, the US is at the bottom of the bell curve for obesity for both men and women among all the Western nations, and Japan and South Korea. There is a strong correlation between the rankings from Bloomberg in chart 1, and the rates of obesity in chart 4.

So for you skeptics and opponents of single payer, here is the article with some very nice graphics that will help you see the light: 

Spain has cracked the secret to a healthy life, with a Mediterranean diet and publicly funded primary healthcare sending it to the top of the latest global rankings.

Source: These are the world’s healthiest nations | World Economic Forum

Medical Mystery: Something Happened to the U.S. Health System After 1980 | The Incidental Economist

Good morning all. While perusing my LinkedIn feed, I found this article from May of last year, and thought it would be a perfect addition to the series of articles posted last week about Medicare for All/Single Payer, and why opposition to it is more harmful than the alleged or imagined fear-mongering we are seeing from many quarters.

This is especially significant in light of my post last week, Health Care Is Not a Market, and as the article below suggests, the US health care system diverged exactly at the time of the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980, and the introduction of pro-market forces, supply-side economics.

So it is no coincidence that as Austin Frakt writes, that prices went up, while health outcomes went down, and that socioeconomic status and other social factors exert larger influences on longevity.

Here is the article:

The following originally appeared on The Upshot (copyright 2018, The New York Times Company). Research for this piece was supported by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.

Source: Medical Mystery: Something Happened to the U.S. Health System After 1980 | The Incidental Economist