Category Archives: Humana

“Yes, We Have No Humana”

Have you ever gone into a store looking to purchase an item they are supposed to carry because that is the kind of store they are, and been told that it is not available in your area?

For example, if I walked into a shoe store and wanted to buy a certain kind of very nice, but not too expensive shoe, and was told that shoe is not available in this area, I would feel that the act of buying shoes from a shoe store was somewhat disorganized and complicated. Especially if the store sells under their name (remember Florsheim?).

This is what happened to me today when I tried to get a Medicare Advantage plan for my medical condition from, you guessed it, Humana.

As my readers well know, I’ve been critical of Humana before due to issues with my late mother. However, after learning about Special Needs Plans from CMS, my agent informed me that Humana does not offer a Medicare Advantage plan for people with my condition in my area.

So, to use my shoe store analogy above, Humana does not sell Special Needs Plans (certain kind of nice, but not too expensive shoe) under their name in my area of the country.

How stupid is that?

Why shouldn’t everyone be able to buy the same shoe no matter where they live?

Naturally, if you wanted to buy sandals, and lived in Alaska during the winter, you wouldn’t, but all things being equal, you should.

Now I understand why in some counties there are only one exchange to purchase insurance, but again that is like saying there is only one shoe store in a certain county where you can buy shoes.

Totally wrong and bad for business. This is why we need Medicare for All, and should stop denying coverage to anyone, anywhere in the country, for whatever reason. If I buy that certain shoe in New York, I should be able to buy it also in California, Kansas, or anywhere else in the country.

To do anything less only makes the system worse.

So, “yes, we have no Humana, we have no Humana today.”

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Blocked Aetna-Humana Merger Reveals True Reason for Pullout from ACA

In an article yesterday in Business Insider, the recently blocked merger between Aetna and Humana is the reason given for Aetna’s sudden decision to leave the ACA exchanges.

Contradictory statements from Aetna in response to this decision, as to their ability to profit from the merger or not profiting from the exchanges, does not hide the fact that the bottom line is this:

The laws of Capitalism are incompatible with the goals of providing health care to everyone, even with all the fancy commercials and advertisements from the insurance companies that they are there for you.

BS!

They are not there for you, unless you are a top executive of the company, or a stockholder or shareholder, or investor. As the article states, this merger would have led to a consolidation of the health care industry to only three mega companies.

Do you want to wait until there is only one, a la the 1970’s movie, “Rollerball”, where corporations have dominated whole industries and replaced nations, or do you want to provide health care to all, no matter what their ability to pay, or if it makes a profit for some greedy bastards?

The choice is up to you.

Here is the link to the entire BI article:

http://www.businessinsider.com/aetna-humana-merger-reason-for-leaving-obamacare-2016-8

Hey, Hey, Ho, Ho…HMO’s Have Got to Go: InHumana, cont’d.

Dear Readers: I beg your indulgence one more time, so that I can finish the narrative of my previous post, “InHumana”.

After spending untold hours yelling and screaming, complaining and pressuring the folks at InHumana, my mother was transferred to another facility late yesterday afternoon.

My day began by contacting InHumana’s Customer Service department, and after speaking to one woman, I asked her to transfer me to a supervisor. I told both the CSR and her supervisor that the facility my mother was in was a dump and a roach motel.

I criticized the company for limiting the choices of facilities in my county, and as I said in my previous post, that was like wanting to buy a car, and your auto insurance company limits your choices to x number of dealers, and an even smaller number of models to choose from, which corresponds to number of “InHumana beds” available in each contracted facility.

While the supervisor escalated the issue to the Access to Care team, I contacted InHumana’s CEO and President, Bruce D. Broussard’s assistant. She transferred me to their Expedited Resolution team, and spoke to two women.

I had previously sent my article, “InHumana” to Mr. Broussard on Sunday evening after I wrote it, and informed all four women I spoke to. I also tweeted Mr. Broussard throughout the day.

I gave InHumana an alternate choice, and was informed some time later that they did not have any “InHumana beds” available at that facility. I told the women that I did not care if they were contracted or not contracted with a better facility, I wanted my mother taken out of there by end of business day.

I told them that as a $41 billion dollar company, that is about to be sold to Aetna, they can afford to spend a little more to put my mother in a better facility. They informed me that because she was in their Medicaid HMO, she was limited to certain facilities.

In the meantime, I called that dump, and spoke to the Case Manager there and informed her that I was upset with the quality of the facility, and that I wanted to have my mother removed from there. She also said I was limited because of her insurance, and said the same thing to her that I said to InHumana.

I threatened to call our attorney if InHumana or the roach motel did not get her out of there, and spoke to his assistant, who had returned my previous call from the previous Friday.

Later in the afternoon, I received a phone call from a woman from InHumana who said she was the representative for this area of Florida. She was contacted to assist, and was having my mother’s case reviewed by their medical director.

After doing some more yelling and screaming at the Expedited Resolution team member to get my mother out of that roach motel, I received a call from the Admissions person at the first facility we contacted on Sunday. She told me that they had a patient go home and that there was a bed available, and that they were going to make arrangements to have my mother transferred.

So it wasn’t due to InHumana’s efforts that my mother got out of that roach motel, but rather serendipity that a patient went home, thus opening up a bed.

But it did not have to be that way. This could have ended early on in the process if InHumana was more interested in the medical care of the patient, instead of protecting their bottom-line, and their shareholder’s value, not to mention the compensation Mr. Broussard must be getting, which would probably cover my mother’s stay in this new facility for quite a long time.

Today I informed by the Admissions office that InHumana only pays for TWENTY DAYS of rehab, and since she spent one day in that roach motel, we already used one day, so we have nineteen more days for them to pay.

After that, it becomes our responsibility, at $150 a day. I don’t know how long she is going to be there, but we don’t have that kind of money, so I will contact our lawyer for his advice,

This is why, along with the aggravation they put me through yesterday, I called this article, “Hey, Hey, Ho, Ho…HMO’s Have Got to Go”.

THEY ARE CHEAP BASTARDS.