Category Archives: Hospital Systems

Top 10 Orthopedic Hospitals by Procedure

Last year, Christmas Eve, to be exact, I wrote a short post about the top ten hospitals for total knee replacement under $50,000.

This year, I’d like to expand on that and discuss the top ten orthopedic hospitals outside of the US for such procedures as Arthroscopy (knee or shoulder), Disc Replacement, and Rotator Cuff Repair.

The website I linked to in my post last year, Archimedicx.com, is the same website I used now to illustrate the difference between costs in the US and elsewhere in the world.

This website is by no means the definitive source of such information. There are other websites that provide similar prices and are only ballpark figures, not actual quotes, or firm prices. Archimedicx’s website will give you a quote once you have chosen from among a list of hospitals you searched for, depending on what procedure you want to have.

I have limited the discussion here to only the three I mentioned above, as arthroscopic procedures for both knees and shoulders, resulted in the same hospitals being displayed.

The price range column indicates those hospitals who charge the amount stated or less, as the website allows an individual to choose the price range they want.

In the table below, the quality score is the ranking algorithm that generates a unique quality score for each procedure in each analyzed hospital (on a scale of 1 to 5). For the sake of clarification, a certain hospital can have different quality scores, depending on the procedure or treatment in question.

 

Table – Top Ten Orthopedic Hospitals by Procedure

top-ten-ortho-hosp

For each procedure examined, there were at least a few hundred other hospitals that one could look at, but I only wanted the top ten, as you see, ranked by quality scores. There are no doubt other hospitals on the website that may score better on other websites, or can provide these procedures for far less than they do.

The idea here is to point out that the US is more expensive than others, and as the following chart shows, we are dead last in terms of care.

nhs-best-system

But it is sad that Americans do not realize this and do what the other countries in that chart have done, provide health care to all.

It is also sad that our system for treating on the job injuries also does not allow people to seek medical care outside of their states or the country. Only two states do that, Washington, and Oregon, but as I’ve said before, there have been exceptions.

Now with a new administration seeking to destroy the social safety net and the ACA, we may see more case shifting and more crowded ER’s and not enough medical personnel to treat them.

And for what?  The commodification of health care for those who can afford it, and for the profit of those who pay for it.

Hospitals Launching Private Health Plans Have Concerns: What It Could Mean to Work Comp

My fellow FAU alumna, Maria Todd, wrote a very good article about what’s at stake for hospitals considering launching private health plans.

While Maria’s article focuses on hospitals and general health care, it would be prudent for the workers’ comp industry to pay attention to what she has to say, as her expertise in the areas of health care, hospital development, healthcare marketing and branding, concierge medicine and medical tourism has taken Maria around the world several times (lucky her – “I never get to go anywhere”).

There is one item Maria raises in her article that should be of vital interest to workers’ comp.

According to Maria, the process to launch private health plans is fraught with complexity and extreme financial risk. She goes on to add that it involves, at a minimum, obtaining a state license and meeting (and maintaining) capital reserve requirements adequate to cover IBNR (incurred but not reported) claims lags.

Those of us who have been in the claims arena of work comp know a little something about IBNR claims, and what that can do to both a carrier’s loss picture and an insured’s frequency and severity, which affects their experience mod.

If hospitals do choose to launch such plans, they will move closer to being insurance companies that happen to provide medical care, rather than just providing medical care as a hospital.

Maria’s recommendation is that they sink their money into something better that will float.

Infographic on Patient Experience: US versus Non-US Hospitals

My good friend, Elizabeth Ziemba, who I met last year in Reynosa, Mexico when I spoke at the 5th Mexico Health & Wellness Travel Show, published the following infographic on patient experience from The Beryl Institute.

It is called, “State of Patient Experience 2015: A Global Perspective on the Patient Experience Movement”.

US hospitals are designated in blue, non-US hospitals in light green.

The following is an excerpt from the infographic. The entire infographic can be seen here:

https://t.e2ma.net/webview/tueam/63af6d0bbad8f609f4e4de367af49924

Patient Experience

Patient Experience1

Patient Experience2

Patient Experience3

Patient Experience4

So the next time anyone says that the US has the best health care, or that medical care abroad can’t be better than it is here, or that the very idea of wanting to give injured workers access to the better medical care that these patient respondents said was better in non-US hospitals than in US hospitals, and is a stupid or ridiculous idea, show them this infographic.

Addendum

A connection of mine asked if there was a breakdown of the non-US hospitals. I looked at the research paper, and found none, but what I did notice was that there was slight differences in some measures between US and non-US hospitals, with the non-US hospitals slightly better than their US counterparts. What that tells me is that medical travel destination hospitals need to do a better job in those areas so that they outshine their US counterparts. Then they will see greater numbers of foreign patients.