Category Archives: Hospital Closings

The $8,000 Rip-off That Is Healthcare

Picking up on a theme I presented in two earlier posts this year, Health Care is Not a Market  and The Free Market Utopian Fantasy, Joe Paduda today asks “what would you do with another $8,000?”

Joe’s post outlines how providers, big pharma, device companies, and healthplans make money from a system designed to do so, and not to help you and your family stay healthy and functional. [ Emphasis Joe’s]

He shows us graphically how big health sector profit margins are, how we spend more than any other country, but die younger, and how healthcare premiums and deductibles and out of pocket costs keep climbing, but wages do not.

His one key point, is the following:

Healthcare is not, and cannot ever be, a free market. A free market requires buyers have the ability to make sellers respond to buyers’ needs – yet we all know we consumers have zero ability to make pharma, hospitals, big doctor groups, device companies respond to our needs.

Lastly, Joe asks the question: “If air travel worked like health care?” [Video link]

Would you rely on the airlines with your health care? Would you rely on the health care industry to fly you to your nephew’s wedding in Orlando? Of course, not.

So, why would you continue to defend, support and protect a dysfunctional, broken, wasteful, bloated, health care system that does not work like the free market, but only makes huge profits for the insurance companies, drug companies, device manufacturers, hospitals, investors, stock and shareholders.

And yes, you hanger’s on in consulting and research organizations who constantly attack single payer health care because it, one, puts you out of a job, and two, takes away any profits you and your company makes from advising  on or researching how to squeeze more profit out of the system.

One thing is for certain. I could sure use that $8,000 right now. My health care and other issues have taken a lot more from me than $8,000, but I’d settle for that. Wouldn’t you?

1 in 5 rural hospitals at risk of closing, Navigant says | Healthcare Dive

Readers of this blog will recall that I wrote four earlier posts about the closing of rural hospitals, so the article from Healthcare Dive.com comes as no surprise.

Previous posts ( https://wp.me/p2QJfz-GeL, https://wp.me/p2QJfz-IZ3, https://wp.me/p2QJfz-N0u, and https://wp.me/p2QJfz-QSn) go into greater detail about the seriousness of the issue.

But once again, we have to remind the readers that until we enact Single Payer health care, more Americans will lose access to medical care at rural hospitals.

Here is the article:

More than 60% of those facilities are “highly essential” to the heath and economic well-being of their communities, according to a new report.

Source: 1 in 5 rural hospitals at risk of closing, Navigant says | Healthcare Dive

Hospital Mergers Improve Health? Evidence Shows the Opposite – The New York Times

Yesterday’s post, Hospital lobby ramps up ‘Medicare for all’ opposition | Healthcare Dive, suggested that moving towards an improved and expanded Medicare for All system would force hospitals to close, so the article below in today’s New York Times would seem to argue that the urge to merge does not improve health.

So on the one hand, if we adopt a democratic socialist approach to health care, hospitals may close; yet, if we allow them to follow capitalist economic laws regarding economies of scale, they don’t offer better care.

Perhaps, then it is better to try the democratic socialist approach, because the economies of scale approach has not worked, and let’s see if hospitals do close, or they see an increase in patients due to more people being covered.

Hospital lobby ramps up ‘Medicare for all’ opposition | Healthcare Dive

Sound the alarm bells, the health care industry is trying to prevent Americans from having the same kind of health care other Western industrialized countries give their citizens — universal health care; in this case, an improved and expanded Medicare-for-All.

Instead, they want to perpetuate the current system which by all accounts, is failing to provide quality health care at affordable costs, with better outcomes.

And the tactic they are using is fear-mongering of the worse kind, saying that if we move towards a Medicare-for-All system, the people who like their employer-based health care, or the hospitals, insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies, etc., will lose what they have, hospitals will close, and companies go bankrupt; in other words, they will lose huge profits the current broken system generates for them.

As the following article from Healthcare Dive reports, the hospital lobby is opposing this movement towards a more equitable system of health care in this country all for the purpose of protecting their bottom lines.

Don’t let them scare you. Universal health care is a right, not a privilege. We are the only Western industrial nation without such a system. People before profits. Health care for all, not for the few.

Here is the article:

As more Democratic presidential hopefuls embrace the idea, health systems and providers have picked up lobbying efforts arguing it would shutter hospitals.

Source: Hospital lobby ramps up ‘Medicare for all’ opposition | Healthcare Dive

Mid-Week Catch-Up

Borrowing a page from another blogger, here are some items that I have seen this week that I did not immediately post to the blog. The first three are courtesy of Medical Travel.com.

From AHA.org, comes an article about the Zika epidemic I wrote about a while ago. About 14% of babies age one or older who were born in U.S. territories to pregnant women infected with Zika virus since 2016 have at least one health problem possibly caused by exposure to the virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported today. About 6% had Zika-associated birth defects, 9% nervous system problems and 1% both.

From Health Affairs.org, comes a report about the fundamental flaw of health care and the recurring-payment-for-outcomes solution.

Bloomberg.org reported that US hospitals are shutting at a 30-a-year pace with no end in sight.

Lastly, Health Affairs blog posted an article about an issue I covered some years ago, the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).

Have a good rest of the week after remembering the fallen of 9/11. FYI, I was in Houston at the time, just having started a new job with Aon there, and heard about the first plane crashing into the north tower while driving to work and listening to the radio. As we were all new, and had little to do, I took a brief siesta and when I went into the hallway, was told to go upstairs to the break room. There was a TV on, and as I entered the room, the south tower went down. This NYC born kid was not sure what was going to happen next, surrounded as I was by all these Texans. I remembered the people and companies I knew there in both towers, especially my cousin who was there for the 1993 attack.

 

Nearly 20% of US hospitals weak or at risk of closing, analysis finds | Healthcare Dive

Key risk factors including low capital expenditures, more capacity in a 10-mile radius and for-profit versus nonprofit status, the Morgan Stanley report said.

Source: Nearly 20% of US hospitals weak or at risk of closing, analysis finds | Healthcare Dive

Rural hospitals in dire need of regulatory relief | Healthcare Dive

“Reducing some of the costly regulatory challenges we face would help staunch the bloodletting,” said Leslie Marsh, CEO of Lexington Regional Health Center.

Source: Rural hospitals in dire need of regulatory relief | Healthcare Dive