Category Archives: Hispanics

Immigrants in construction — key facts « Working Immigrants

Peter Rousmaniere posted the following fact sheet about immigrants working in construction. While this has no bearing on health care at present, it does have some bearing on workers’ comp, especially in light of the current regime’s draconian policy towards immigrants from Central America.

As this “crisis” progresses, it may be harder for construction companies to find workers to employ on construction sites.

This, in turn would mean that they may be less construction work, and for the insurance industry, less risk and less profit to be made from insuring these projects.

In workers’ comp, that would translate into less frequency of losses, but it would also cut off revenue from carriers covering such risks.

And he promised to create jobs? Hardly.

Source: Immigrants in construction — key facts « Working Immigrants

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The Cry of the Children

Taking a break from writing about health care, workers’ comp, and medical travel, I want to talk about something I saw, or rather heard yesterday afternoon on MSNBC.

It was an audio (furnished by ProPublica) of children crying at a detention center (more like Concentration Camp) that broke my heart. I was in tears, and very seldom do so. But those cries went right to me.

If they did to you, then you are a good human being. If not, then you have no soul. And please, don’t quote me that that’s the law, or it is in the Bible, or they are illegal and have no rights.

EVERY HUMAN BEING HAS RIGHTS.

And as for whether or not they are “illegal”, I guess you forgot that when your ancestors arrived on the Mayflower or whatever ship they sailed on, the landlords here for thousands of years knew you were “illegal” too.

The ancestors of all of these people now streaming to our border came to this hemisphere some 20,000 years ago, so by those standards, you, me, and all the rest of us are undocumented aliens. But no one tells us to leave. Or yanks our kids from our arms.

That we do this and many other things to minorities is a symptom of our greed, ignorance, and stupidity that never seems to die out. Take for example, our Confederate-era Attorney General, Jeff “Foghorn Leghorn” Sessions. That refugee from the set of “Gone With the Wind” is not only a religious zealot, but a full-out bigot and racist from a region of the nation that still has not given up its racism and hatred of non-whites, and non-Christians. In this case, non-Protestants from Catholic Latin America.

Too many of our fellow Americans have been poisoned by talk radio, Fox News, and local politicians to see that we are all immigrants and that at times in the long history of the human species, we were migrants too. Our prehistoric ancestors migrated, as did many more recent peoples. But none ever subjected to such cruelty, except during the 1930’s and 1940’s.

We were all taught in school to believe in the ideals of America as a shining city on a hill (incidentally, an idea the Puritans created), and was more about a religious view than a secular one. We were all taught about why we fought a revolution, why we have a Declaration of Independence, and why we have a Constitution that secures our rights and liberties.

And now we are throwing all that away because of a clique of neo-fascist, racist bullies and bigots, headed by a pathological liar and con man, who has conned a large segment of the American people (by which I mean White people) that he can make America great again, all the while cozying up to dictators and dissing our friends.

Folks, this is how Hitler and the Nazis began. And it ended with 6 million dead (my maternal great-uncle, aunt and their six children among them), so don’t tell me it is legal or biblical. You know where you can put that.

And those of you who say they have stolen our jobs or they are criminals and rapists, I have news for you…next time you are in a restaurant, or a family member is in a hospital, bus your own table, and clean up your family member’s dirty linen. Because if Herr Miller (Stephen) gets his way, there won’t be any bus boys, nurses’ aides, home health aides, janitors, and other occupations Americans won’t be filling begging for workers. Oh, and you can come to Florida and pick your own fruits and vegetables, because there won’t be anyone to do it for you.

AMERICA IS A NATION OF IMMIGRANTS, SO WE NEED THESE PEOPLE.

 

An Old Story Resurfaces

My loyal readers may recall that in two separate occasions, I discussed a company in North Carolina called HSM that chose to send its employees to India and Costa Rica for medical care under their self-insured health care plan.

The two previous articles, US Companies Look to ‘Medical Tourism’ To Cut Costs and Self-Insured Employers and Medical Travel: One Company’s Experience came out of an interview in Business Insurance.com that was conducted by the author and the Director of Benefits for HSM, Tim Isenhower.

This morning, my good friend Laura Carabello of US Domestic Medical Travel.com published another interview with Tim, adding two more locations to their medical travel portfolio, Cancun and the Cayman Islands.

The interview is reproduced verbatim below, and pay attention to one point Tim makes about his company’s workers’ comp costs, a point I mentioned previously and cite as a basis for considering implementing medical travel into workers’ comp.

Here is the interview:

SPOTLIGHT: Tim Isenhower, Director of Benefits, HSM
Spotlight U.S. Domestic by Editor – March 20, 2018

About Tim Isenhower

Tim Isenhower, Director of Benefits – has worked with HSM and their self-insured health insurance for the past 25 years. Managing a self-insured health plan through the 90’s to today has provided him the opportunity to think out of the box for reduced healthcare cost programs including direct contracting, on site clinics, chronic disease management, and medical tourism. With IndUShealth, Tim and HSM were pioneers in self-insured companies offering medical tourism, as was presented on ABC News and Nightline.

About HSM

HSM is a privately-owned holding company based in Hickory, North Carolina, that specializes through its subsidiaries, in the manufacture of components for the furniture, bedding, transportation, packaging and healthcare industries, and the design and construction of automated production machinery for the bedding, apparel, aerospace and other industries.

Medical Travel Today (MTT): As a pioneer in the medical travel phenomenon, your story and your company’s role is so intriguing.

Tim Isenhower (TI): We are a manufacturing company and have had facilities coast to coast, as well as technologies in small towns and big cities. We were negotiating discount rates with hospitals across the country, where prices varied based on location.

I went to a human resource seminar in Raleigh in 2007 and Rajesh Rao’s company, Indus Health, was presenting medical travel to India as an option for employers. I went to India with Raj and his team, and got a physical exam which took less than six hours. In the U.S., this type of physical would have taken a month, from schedule to results.

So, we began offering medical travel to India for our employees during our annual enrollment process. We told them that if they chose to have a medical procedure done in India we would pay 100 percent, including travel with a companion.

We got no takers in the beginning. But at one of our final meetings, a fork lift driver from one our plants volunteered to have a knee replacement done in India – he simply couldn’t afford to have it done in the U.S.

He had never even been inside an airport, so I went with him and his travel companion. I was a little nervous because he had no experience traveling. But we got to India, and he actually did very well. He was impressed by the level of treatment he received.

When he returned home, he wrote a testimonial for our company newsletter. After that, more of our employees started traveling to India.

Soon word-of-mouth inspired more of them to get their surgeries in India because they saw what a positive experience it was.

MTT: So why did you shift your destination away from India?

TI: The cultural differences and distance resulted in many of our employees becoming homesick.

So, we started looking closer to home for medical care options. We have a large Hispanic population and Costa Rica had a history of high quality healthcare. We chose that area as the new medical travel destination.

Mostly, we send people for gastric procedures, joint replacements, back surgeries, hernia surgeries – a wide gamut of procedures.

Positive word-of-mouth has kept up the level of interest, and we also visit every location each year to promote the medical travel offering so more employees can understand its benefits.

MTT: And now you have expanded to Cancun. Do you find that there are other opportunities?

TI: We have. We had a patient go to Cancun just a couple of months ago. She did very well and that was a little different concept because it was an American doctor who flew down to Cancun to do her hip replacement. She was very happy with the services, pricing and results. We also send people to the Cayman Islands for various surgeries.

MTT: What has this experience meant to you, as an employer, beyond the cost savings?

TI: It’s really benefitted employee morale, to have a chance to travel to a place like Costa Rica, Cancun or the Cayman Islands. They come back and tell everyone about what a positive experience it was.

We’ve also been able to use our medical travel option as a recruitment tool.

What’s more, we saw our worker’s comp costs decline. [Emphasis mine]

I get thank-you notes from our medical travelers all the time, and we publicize these positive experiences within the company.

There’s no charge to the employee, and we give them a bonus when they return of 20 percent of what they saved the company.

MTT: Wow! That’s very generous.

TI: Up to $10,000. We are just trying to be a good employer, and this is just one way of doing that.

MTT: Do you know how many of your employees travel for surgery every year?

TI: I have lost count. We have roughly 2,500 employees now, and we’ve probably sent about 500 of them during the period of time that we have been doing this.

MTT: Did you ever have any unexpected outcomes?

TI: We’ve had people who had issues with back surgery, and they weren’t allowed to come home until the issue was resolved. But it was resolved.

They got better, came home and are doing very well.

That doesn’t always happen in a U.S. hospital. Here if a patient has issues down the road, they are on their own.

MTT: No legal issues?

TI: Fortunately, no. And the program is growing.

We’ve had everybody from executives to line workers utilize the program. Not everyone qualifies. A few have been eliminated because they have comorbidities that makes traveling for surgery unsafe, so these few were turned away.

MTT: And if you had to improve the program in any way, what would you suggest?

TI: I don’t know how I’d improve it.

Everybody that comes back is ecstatic about the program. The folks at Indus Health make it work. I know other administrators who couldn’t make it work. But Indus Health’s nurse case managers and screening process make it a no-brainer.

Rajesh Rao: We work very hard to make sure our patients are happy with our services. We don’t promise what we can’t deliver.

We work hard with our destinations to make sure we can provide assistance and high quality outcomes because that is what sells the program.

Jim Polsfut: I would like to add that it is a pleasure to work with Indus Health for all the reasons that Tim mentions. Their expertise and thoroughness have worked out very well with us.
We focus on three main objectives.

First, the quality outcomes.

Second, the satisfaction that we get from helping patients save money. In the U.S., it is so expensive to receive medical care even when you have a health plan. In that regard, the patient benefits in a significant way.

Finally, the cost benefit to the employer. For self-insured employers, this is important because of the hyperinflation of medical costs in the U.S. It’s difficult for employers to avoid the impact of healthcare expenses.

All of these factors motivate us, and give us a lot of satisfaction to provide a quality medical travel option.

Here is the link to the original: http://medicaltraveltoday.com/spotlight-tim-isenhower-director-of-benefits-hsm/

Foreign-born Workers on the Rise: What it Means for Work Comp and Medical Travel

Working Immigrants.com posted a report this weekend that indicated that the percentage of foreign-born workers in the US will rise from 16% to 20% of the workforce over the next 26 years.

It will grow for the next 15 years, then the pace will slow considerably. Citing a Census Bureau publication from March 2015, Working Immigrants said that the total population of the US is expected to grow from about 319 million in 2014, to 359 million in 2030, and 380 million in 2040, which is an increase of 19% over the next 26 years.

According to the report, the working age population will grow by 12%.

There is a higher rate of employment among foreign-born, due to the fact that they mainly come here to work, and they are more concentrated in working age brackets ― 80% between 18 and 64, vs 62% among native born.

Modest increases in the foreign-born population will result in higher shares of employment for these workers.

By 2040, foreign-born workers will be one fifth of the workforce.

It is a given that not many of these workers will have a great command of English, and the most likely foreign-born workers will be Hispanics and Asians.

A workforce that does not have a command of English, is mainly from Central and South America and Asia, will no doubt put a strain on an already strained social welfare system, especially workers’ comp, since they are more likely to be injured on the job.

So those of you in the medical travel industry looking for patients and trying to entice well-off Americans down to Latin America for dental work, cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery, and other treatments not available in the US or that are too expensive, should consider expanding your offerings to your fellow Latino immigrants, or change direction and consider doing so by offering to facilitate less expensive surgeries for common injuries found in the workers’ comp space.

And those of you in workers’ comp who have shut your minds to new ideas and refuse to listen to what I am saying, either should learn Spanish or Chinese, or deal with the changing nature of health care globally, and stop worrying about stepping on the toes of the vested interests, and start thinking about the interests of all those new foreign-born workers who will be coming here in the next 26 years (24 now that it is 2016).

They may not feel comfortable going to a hospital for surgery if the staff there does not speak their language, or the food is unfamiliar, and they may even recover faster if they know they are surrounded by friends and family in their home country. That will lead to a more productive and happier employee.

And a happier employee will improve your bottom line.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Comp Blog is now viewed all over the world in over 250 countries and political entities. I have published 300 articles and counting, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Cross-Border Health Care in California Expands

In my earlier posts on cross-border health care, “Cross-border Workers’ Compensation a Reality in California“, “NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View“, “NAFTA, Work Comp and Cross-Border Medical Care: A Legal View: Update“, and “Cross-border Health Care and the ACA“, I discussed the way some Mexican workers living in Mexico, but working in the US or traveling between the US and Mexico, have been able to get health care on both sides of the border.

An article in Fierce Healthcare.com last month,  says that Scripps Health will help run a hospital in Tijuana, along with Sistemas Medicos Nacionales S.A. de C.V. (SIMNSA).

SIMNSA is the medical insurer in Mexico that the Insurance Company of the West (ICW) contracted with some time ago to treat Mexican workers of ICW’s US insureds in the San Diego/Imperial Valley area of CA.

According to the article by Ilene MacDonald, the insurer will design, build and operate the facility, and will seek accreditation from the international arm of the Joint Commission, the Joint Commission International (JCI), and will be an affiliate of the Scripps Health Network.

Those who think that cross-border health care, whether general or work comp-related is not going to happen better think again, because it is, and while this is just now involving the areas along the US-Mexico border, with or without that stupid wall some jerk wants to build and have Mexico pay for, medical travel on this continent is moving forward.

The only thing that is not happening yet is travel further down into Mexico and into the other countries in Central and South America. But that will happen, no matter what you or any putz running for president says.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Blog is now viewed all over the world in 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Carta Abierta a la Comunidad Latinoamericana de Turismo Médico

Hoy celebra el primer aniversario de la creación de FutureComp Consulting, y el pasado 29 de octubre fue el aniversario de tres años de la creación de mi blog, Comp transformando los trabajadores.

En los tres años que he estado escribiendo mi blog, he asistido a turismo médico tres conferencias, dos en Florida y uno en México en noviembre de 2014, donde dio una presentación titulada, “Barreras, obstáculos, oportunidades y dificultades de implementación de turismo médico en compensación a los trabajadores.”

En estas conferencias han conocí a muchas personas de América Latina y han dicho de mi idea para la transformación de compensación a los trabajadores en los Estados Unidos mediante el envío de pacientes a los países de la región.

Hasta la fecha, no una persona que conocí en estas conferencias, ni quien ha leído mi blog y es de la región ha puesto en contacto conmigo para ofrecer su apoyo y servicios para hacer de esta idea una realidad.

Y al discutir la cuestión con los americanos, especialmente ésos en la industria de la compensación a los trabajadores, su respuesta ha sido llamarlo una idea estúpida y ridícula y no.

También han sugerido que médicos de su región no es hasta los estándares americanos, a pesar de que he señalado a ellos que no están garantizados los resultados aquí, y que errores pueden ocurrir en los hospitales locales.

Este es un ejemplo de una típica respuesta de alguien en la industria de comp de los trabajadores:

“Honestamente, turismo médico para empleados lesionados no funcionará. Ya estamos desafiados diariamente cuando empleados lesionados dejan el país y tenemos que brindarles atención fuera de los Estados Unidos. Te escucho pero es un tramo. No podemos obtener buenos resultados aquí odio pensar qué sucedería cuando enviamos algún otro lugar. Las leyes son mucho demasiado complicadas para obtener el resultado deseado”.

En mi blog, escribí el siguiente artículo basado en algunas observaciones sobre los medios sociales que incluí en un diálogo virtual, “Punto/contrapunto: A Virtual diálogo en el fondo de aplicación médica Turismo en compensación”.

En la presentación que dio en Reynosa, dijo que hay una falta de conocimiento acerca de la calidad de la atención médica en el extranjero (llamada “medicina de tercer mundo”) y que americano abrigó las actitudes negativas hacia la atención médica en el extranjero, así como la presunción conocida como “Excepcionalismo norteamericano” por el que médicos americanos sólo saben practicar medicina y sólo hospitales estadounidenses están calificados para ofrecer cuidado.

Sin embargo, no todos los americanos son así; de hecho, un abogado que representa a los trabajadores lesionados tenía cirugía de rodilla en Costa Rica y tenía una gran experiencia, quiere que sus clientes tengan también.

En mi presentación, presentado seis principales barreras y obstáculos para la implementación, pero escrito esta carta ahora, quiero decir a la comunidad de turismo de América Latina, que hay una séptimo barrera y obstáculo y es su incapacidad del mercado y defender su médico servicios a la industria del seguro americano y más concretamente, a comunidad de comp de los trabajadores.

Ha sido una de las razones por qué he estado escribiendo acerca de esto por tanto tiempo. En muchos de mis artículos, te imploro que hagas algo al respecto. Incluso dije esto en México cuando le dije que tenía que ir después del mercado; el mercado no vendrá a usted.

Por lo que no crees que yo soy un gringo loco, Norte Americano, aquí están algunos de los artículos que he escrito que hace exactamente eso:

“La estrellas alineado: México como un destino de turismo médico para los trabajadores de Estados Unidos nacidos en México, en compensación a los trabajadores”

“Un menor costo, atención médica de alta calidad está cercano”

“Limpiar el aire: mi defensa de la aplicación de turismo médico en compensación a los trabajadores”

“Far in front of the crowd”

“Muy por delante de la multitud”

“E PLURIBUS UNUM: América Latina y Caribe inmigración, compensación y turismo médico”

Por qué el turismo médico para Comp trabajadores es una idea cuyo tiempo ha llegado»

“Questions, Questions, How Medical Tourism Can Become a Real Alternative in Health Care and What It Means for Workers’ Compensation

“More questions, Questions: A Call for Answers from the Medical Tourism Industry”

«Más preguntas, preguntas: Una llamada para obtener respuestas de la industria del turismo médico»

Finalmente, la semana que viene iba a ser cuando yo me iba a dar una segunda presentación en México, esta vez en Puerto Vallarta, pero por motivos personales, tuve que sacar.

Esta es la presentación que iba a dar que describe los desafíos que enfrenta la compensación a los trabajadores, y lo que debe hacer la industria del turismo médico.

Así que mi reto es Latina y América Central. ¿Vas a comercializar sus servicios a esta industria, y defenderá su atención médica, como igual o mejor que la atención que recibe en los Estados Unidos?

¿Precio y transparencia? ¿Compartirán datos con líderes escépticos de su mejor atención médica, o vas a permitir que le llamen “barkers del carnaval”?

Estoy dispuesto a trabajar con usted. Sabes como contactarme.

 

SPOTLIGHT Interview – October 31, 2013

This is the original interview published on October 31, 2013 by Medical Travel Today.com.

Medical Travel Today (MTT): Tell us your position in the medical tourism industry, as well as your thoughts on integrating medical tourism into workers’ compensation cases in the U.S.

Richard Krasner (RK): Currently, I am a blogger, blogging about the implementation of medical tourism into workers’ compensation.

I first began looking into integrating medical tourism into workers’ compensation when I needed a topic for a paper in my Health Law class as part of my M.H.A. degree program in March of 2011. A lawyer who was working for a medical tourism facilitator company at that time, and who had written an article in a law journal about medical tourism, gave me the idea after my first topic did not pan out. She thought that the legal barriers to implementing international medical providers into workers’ compensation through medical provider networks was a good idea, and since I had a small interest in the subject of medical tourism, I submitted that as my topic to the instructor.

He gave me his approval and, as I started to do my research, I found many articles on medical tourism and nothing on medical tourism and workers’ compensation, so I knew my task was a difficult one. But as the point of the paper was to write about a legal issue and persuade people one way or the other, I felt that I could mention the lack of literature on the subject and perhaps open up dialogue in that area. I then found a roundtable discussion from the January/February 2008 issue of the journal Telemedicine and e-health.

In the discussion, I found something that I had been looking for, but had not expected in a medical journal: a validation from four of the participants for my idea to implement medical tourism into workers’ compensation. I made their discussion the centerpiece of my paper, and thus my argument in favor of implementation. They said essentially that they thought that medical tourism could work for non-emergent, i.e., non-emergencies or long-range issues, such as knee or hip replacement, chronic back injury and repetitive action injuries, and that it would not be a leading offering. That is when the light bulb went on, and I realized that it could be accomplished as an option for the injured worker to consider.

Initially, my research consisted of finding articles that discussed medical tourism in destinations, such as India, Singapore and Thailand, and my thought then was that it might be a stretch to send injured workers that far away, but that maybe it could be done. Later on, as I got more involved in medical tourism through my attendance at the 5th World Medical Tourism and Global Healthcare Congress in October 2012, and through conversations online with another lawyer, I realized that the best chance for this to happen was in Latin America and the Caribbean, and that given the rise of the Latino population in the U.S., sending patients home to their home countries for treatment would present no language or cultural barriers, and would allow friends and family in those countries to visit them during recovery, which will improve their self-esteem and improve their recovery time.

I have since come to believe that all injured workers could be offered this as an option, not just those of Latin or Caribbean origin.

MTT: How will the integration benefit individuals, health insurance companies, and the entire medical community, both domestically and internationally?

RK: I believe first and foremost that medical tourism will have its most important benefit on the individual because of some of the things I mentioned above, namely little or no cultural or language barriers to overcome between Spanish or English in most cases, or between Portuguese or other languages in the region. Also, as I said, their friends and families back home can visit, which would make their recovery more relaxing, more pleasant and would show them that the patient is not sitting at home just collecting a check. It would also give the patient greater self-esteem and speed recovery. Finally, by being treated in the better hospitals in the home country, a patient’s friends and family will see that their loved one is being cared for by the best doctors and at the best facility in their country.

I think the benefit for the health insurance company or, in this case, the workers’ compensation carrier would be that they will not have to pay for expensive procedures, such as hip or knee repair/replacement, shoulder surgery, spinal fusion surgery or carpal tunnel surgery. This is despite the fact that many states have fee schedules for workers’ compensation, which tells providers how much to charge the carrier for each procedure, and which may be less than the normal fees charged. Nonetheless, as the recent New York Times article indicates, the U.S. has the highest cost for healthcare, and it is not slowing down, nor has the average medical cost for lost-time workers’ compensation claims, as I have written about in my white paper and my blog.

I think for the entire medical community domestically and internationally, it will have several benefits, the first of which will be the realization that healthcare is globalizing and that it is no longer possible to consider that quality medical care is available only in the developed world. Second, it will lead to the development of international accreditation standards, quality standards and other standards that up to now have hampered medical tourism’s expansion and growth.

These standards will take time to be adopted and will be expensive to implement for the medical tourism facilities involved, as it has already been for the implementation of other standards and forms of accreditation, such as from the Joint Commission International.

Thirdly, it will have the benefit of bringing American patients to medical providers in other countries, those who otherwise would never be seen by foreign doctors except for those who have gone to foreign-born doctors practicing here in the U.S., whether in private practice or in a hospital setting. Fourth, and this is more of an issue with workers’ compensation cases, doctors abroad will be able to get broad experience treating work-related injuries that they have never seen, thus adding to their medical experience, and providing their fellow citizens with that experience should they ever require it.

Medical tourism will open up global healthcare to all inhabitants of this planet, not just those looking for cosmetic surgery, or procedures that are too expensive or unavailable in their home countries. It will certainly open it up to those who otherwise could not afford to travel out of their country for treatment.

MTT: What would you say are the steps necessary to take in order for medical tourism to be integrated into workers’ compensation effectively?

RK: First, there has to be a removal of all or many of the legal barriers that I mentioned in my white paper, as well as many others that I could not or did not mention. Also, there has to be some understanding on how the legal issues surrounding medical tourism can be solved such as malpractice, legal liability, privacy issues, medical records transfers, etc.

There are financial steps that need to be addressed, such as which currency the payments will be made in, any incentives to injured workers, referring physicians, treating physicians, destination hospitals, as well as travel insurance coverage for things not covered under workers’ compensation. And lastly there has to be a willingness on the part of employers and insurance companies, third party administrators, and lawyers to accept medical tourism as part of workers’ compensation. I have discussed this with several people recently through emails, and in the past six months since beginning my blog, and have written about this as well.

As the Chinese say, a journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step. An industry like the workers’ compensation industry in the U.S., which is concerned with issues, such as pain medication abuse, physician dispensing of drugs and dealing with cost-curbing strategies that have failed, must come to the realization that the journey for them must begin now — before costs skyrocket any further.

MTT: What can you see being potential deterrents in integrating medical travel benefits into workers compensation?

RK: First of all, let me say that I don’t have all the answers, and I cannot foresee all contingencies and problems associated with traveling abroad for care. But I do want to make this clear so that your readers will not think that I don’t know what I am talking about, or that they will think that integrating medical tourism into workers’ compensation will be easy and not fraught with difficulties and complications.

It will not be easy, there are and will be complications from flying after undergoing surgery abroad, just as there are if the patient was treated at the local hospital. I am not a medical person, so my knowledge of how patients will tolerate air travel after surgery or what complications will arise is beyond my experience. But I can say this: I don’t see a difference between a patient who traveled abroad for medical care as a private patient for cosmetic, body improvement or other forms of surgery usually associated with medical tourism and a patient who is traveling abroad for surgery as a result of an on-the-job injury. Yes, there are differences in the process of treatment and aftercare and recovery, but if the private patient can develop complications, so too can the workers’ compensation patient.

To answer the question then, I think deterrents include a lack of will, fear of lawsuits in countries with laws that do not favor the insurance company or the employer, malpractice insurance and legal liability that does not meet American standards, employee choice to stay at home, and pressure from special interest groups like doctors, hospitals, pain clinics, rehab facilities, trial lawyers, etc.

MTT: During a time of rapid healthcare reform, why do you think medical tourism hasn’t been connected to workers compensation already?

RK: Because there is so much uncertainty over the impact the Affordable Care Act will have, not only on healthcare, but also on workers’ compensation. In my research on that subject, I found that there will be little immediate impact, but down the line there will be, especially as more people get health insurance, and also because of the doctor and nurse shortage, which will affect both healthcare and workers’ compensation.

There are critics of the law who say it will raise costs, and then there are those who say it will lower costs, as some have already pointed out recently. But only time will tell who is right and who is wrong. Finally, I don’t think many in the workers’ compensation industry have ever considered looking abroad, except to plan their next vacation.

MTT: Is there anything else you would like to add at this point that you think is significant in terms of medical tourism, workers’ compensations and/or the integration of the two?

RK: Yes, as I said in my blog post, The Faith of My Conviction, what is needed is the will to do it, the courage to make it happen, the hard work to get it there, and the determination to bring the two industries together. I have had experts tell me that it won’t happen, but I pointed out right away in my post the discussion I found between the four medical professionals, and I believe that as medical professionals they have a better understanding of the issues involved than I do as a layman. I trust their judgment of the issue and defer to them for my belief that it can be done.

So who is right and who is wrong? I don’t know the answer to that, but I do know this: for 20 years, the average medical cost for lost-time claims has gone from around $8,100 to almost $30,000 with no decrease in cost, but with a slowdown in the rate of increase. Is that progress? Is that a sign that all other avenues tried have not succeeded? Perhaps it will take higher costs to wake people up to the reality that medical care, like all other goods and services, always goes to those places where the goods or services can be produced at cheaper cost with better quality.