Category Archives: Health Plans

Despicable!

“Capital is reckless of the health or length of life of the laborer, unless under compulsion from society.”

Karl Marx

“Our policy is to create a national health service in order to ensure that everybody in the country irrespective of means, age, sex or occupation shall have equal opportunities to benefit from the best and most up-to-date medical and allied services available.”

Winston Churchill

 

Here we have two quotes dealing with the same subject. The first quote is from the father of Scientific Socialism, i.e., Marxism and Communism, and the second quote is from the wartime Prime Minister of Great Britain, who was a staunch anti-Communist.

But what transpired today in Washington, is far from the view of Marx, or the view of Churchill. In other words, it is DESPICABLE!

Never before in the history of the United States, has the government of the people, by the people, and for the people ever taken away something the government gave them in the first place.

Not even the enactment of the 18th Amendment outlawing the sale and production of alcohol, stoops to the level of total disregard for the health and welfare of the American people. Alcohol was never something the government had to give to people, they produced it themselves. Our founding fathers were brewers and distillers of alcoholic beverages.

But the vote this afternoon represents a step towards a society this nation has not seen in many decades. You hear that Republicans want to take the country back. The obvious place they want to take us to is the 19th century, when no one had health care, there was no Medicare or Medicaid, or Social Security, Unemployment Insurance, and Workers’ Comp.

There are specific reasons for this, which I will discuss.

First, pure and simple, it is greed. They want the money dedicated for health care and the other medical plans for a huge tax cut for their wealthy friends.

Second, the health insurance companies can now get to pick and choose who they want to cover, what they will cover, and what they will charge you if you have a serious pre-existing condition or a life-threatening disease. We know this as adverse selection.

Third, they don’t believe in giving “entitlements” to anyone except the military and the wealthy.

Fourth, their libertarian, puritanical, Calvinism teaches them that the poor are undeserving of the benefits that money brings, so let them die, and who cares if they are poor, it is a sign of a moral failing.

Another quote from Churchill says that you can always trust the Americans to do the right thing after they have tried everything else.

Well, after today, we have tried everything else. We have given employers the right to offer health insurance to their employees, we have allowed private insurance companies to sell policies to individuals, and we have created separate health care plans for children, the elderly, the military and their families, members of Congress, and the poor.

But for all the reasons I have given above, and many more, this nation refuses to enact single payer health care, the only thing we haven’t tried, and the one form of universal health care every other Western nation provides its citizens.

One fellow blogger last year during the Democratic Primary, said that while he liked Bernie Sanders, he knew that the health insurance companies were not going to scrape their businesses and start from scratch.

But maybe they should. It is because the capitalist profit motive is at the heart of what, in the words of Walter Cronkite, our health care system really is. “America’s health care system is neither healthy, caring, nor a system.” Too many are profiting from other people’s misery, and driving many into poverty. This is the richest nation on Earth, and this is how we treat our fellow citizens.

It is strange that the Conservative Party of Great Britain believes in single payer, but the American Republican Party does not. The truth is, they are no longer the Republican Party but the Republican Libertarian Party.

Once upon a time, members of their right-wing decried the nation’s drift towards “Creeping Socialism.” With this vote, and with executive orders flowing from 1600 every day, we are witnessing “Creeping Fascism.’ The new Secretary of Labor comes from the fast food industry where workers were mistreated, and still are in some places.

Worker’s rights are being eroded with new overtime rules, wages are stagnant, unemployment is still too high despite what the government says.

One other reason for enacting single payer is that doing so will free employers from having to provide it to their employees, and workers over forty will not have to face losing their jobs and careers they spent their lives in.

We, as a nation, must decide; either we take away health care for millions of Americans, or we make sure everyone has it. There can be no half-measures. Many pundits have said the AHCA (Zombie Health Care Bill) will not pass the Senate, but that is what they said about the House of Representatives.

I hope the Senate will defeat this, but if they don’t, the only option left is single payer.

Ding, Dong, Health Care “Reform” Is Dead: A Political View

Time for another rant, but this time it is based on actual facts, plus an understanding of the real reason repeal and replace of the ACA is not going to happen.

There are many reasons for why repeal and replace has failed; some of them have to do with the complexity of the health care marketplace, others have to do with the fact that all the negative things the opposition said about the law did not come to pass, even though some people are paying higher premiums, or cannot find a doctor because there aren’t enough where they live and have to travel long distances to find a doctor (primary or specialist), or the insurance companies have exited the exchanges, thus limiting the number of payers.

Joe Paduda has been conducting an ACA Deathwatch, and yesterday, Joe wrote that ACA repeal will not happen.

This, he says, is due to the defection of one major GOP legislator, Fred Upton, of Michigan.

But what Joe does not say is why the GOP has been so single-minded in wanting to destroy the ACA (besides the obvious reason of tarnishing Obama’s legacy).

The one guiding principal and reason for “repeal and replace” is solely due to the adoption by the Republican Party (or should I say takeover) by out and out libertarians, and rampant libertarianism.

This has nothing to do with the Libertarian Party, although many members of that party were Republicans in the past; case in point, former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson, who ran for President last year as the Libertarian Party candidate.

To prove to you that this is the case why the GOP has been so one-track minded, one only has to read the response from former GOP Congressman Joe Walsh (you remember him, the guy who yelled “you lie” to Obama during the SOTU speech).

Walsh, not to be confused with the Joe Walsh of rock and roll, said the following in his tweet response to Jimmy Kimmel’s tearful admission that his newborn son had a heart defect that needed surgery, and Kimmel defended the right of others not as fortunate as him and his wife to afford that surgery, which would have been fatal to any other child whose parents could not afford it.

Here is the exact tweet:

Joe Walsh@WalshFreedom

Sorry Jimmy Kimmel: your sad story doesn’t obligate me or anybody else to pay for somebody else’s health care.

At first, you might think this guy is a heartless SOB, but if you read the tweet carefully, and look closely at the word “freedom” after his name, and the tweet itself, you will see that to Mr. Walsh and the rest of his “Freedom” Caucus, it is not that he is heartless, it’s that he is brainless.

Because only a brainless idiot still clings to a political philosophy that time and again has been discredited. He believes he nor anybody else is obligated to pay for someone else’s health care, but I bet he does not feel that way when other people have to pay for his or his children’s public school education, or their ability to have lunch while in school or to even have books to read and pens and pencils with which to do schoolwork with. Or to bring it even closer to home, to have other people (namely taxpayers) pay for his health care when he was in Congress. Do as I say, not do as I do.

Or maybe he sends his kids to private school?

You see, the real reason the GOP is against the ACA is they don’t believe it is the role of the government to do anything for anyone, and that includes providing health care. They are fundamentally opposed to it on philosophical and ideological grounds, and like their Speaker, are slavishly devoted to the rantings and writings of a 20th century novelist and the reactionary views of an economist few have ever heard of.

You know, of course, where the Freedom Caucus came from? It is the legislative part of the Tea Party, founded by former Congressman Tom DeLay (there’s a name for you), and the Tea Party has nothing to do with a hot beverage. It means “Taxed Enough Already”.

But the real impetus behind the Tea Party was not the old folks demanding the government keep its hands off their Medicare. It came from the very wealthy who donated large sums to elect Republicans to office. It started with Howard Jarvis in CA, spread under Reagan and both Bushes, and popped up during the debate over the ACA.

Jimmy Kimmel said the problem with health care was partisanship; however, as written in Salon, the problem is with one party…the Republicans. This by no means lessens the impact of Kimmel’s plea.

The response from President Obama, DNC Chairman Tom Perez, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer was overwhelmingly positive.

The current occupant continued his insane view that the ACA was dead. Sort of like saying Andrew Jackson could have prevented the Civil War, or that he recently met with Frederick Douglass.

Finally, the defeat of repeal and replace is laid at the feet of those GOP congresspersons who are vulnerable in the next election, and are hesitant to incur the wrath of their constituents, if the recent town hall meetings are any indication.

Like health care itself, the defeat has many reasons, but at the core lies the simple fact that libertarian, free market solutions are more dangerous to the health of the American people than the alleged disaster the GOP has painted the ACA with.

Disaster Averted

Yesterday’s crushing defeat of the so-called “American Health Care Act” or AHCA, signals the end of the seven-year long attempt by the Republican Party to legislatively kill the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Yet, as was pointed out on one cable news network last night, it won’t stop the health insurance industry from getting the Republicans in Congress to kill parts of the law slowly by eliminating the taxes that go to pay for the coverage.

Call it “genocide by stealth”, since millions of Americans will die, as per the Congressional Budget Office (CBO’s) scoring of AHCA. If they can’t kill the law outright, the so-called “Freedom Caucus”, actually the Congressional version of the Tea Party, will kill it slowly.

Why do you think they keep saying it is a disaster and it is crumbling? It’s because they are dead set against anyone getting health care unless someone else can make a profit from selling a policy.

Then there is the other question, the one usually raised by liberals and progressives, especially those who supported Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders last year in the primaries, as to why we are the only Western country without universal coverage.

The answer is complex, but not complicated (“who knew health care was so complicated?). First, everything the government of the US has ever implemented for the benefit of people has had to pass muster with the Constitution. It either has to be covered by the Constitution directly, or implied through the taxing mechanism.

Second, the Founding Fathers never mentioned or promoted the right to health care, as the prevailing political and social philosophy of the day was concerned with freedom, liberty, and private property. It has been unclear what, if anything, was meant by the phrase, “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”, let alone, the phrase, “promote the general welfare.”

Why they never mentioned health care and why other nations have it, is due to the fact that the US was founded during the first half of the period historians call, “the Enlightenment”, when the right to private property, liberty, and freedom were the topics of discussion on both sides of the Atlantic. Basically, the difference between Classical Liberalism (Conservatism) and Modern Liberalism (Liberalism) is between negative rights (the right not to be killed) versus positive rights (the right to a job, education, housing, health care, etc.)

Canada gained its limited independence from Britain nearly a hundred years after we did, and therefore was influenced by the philosophy of the second half of the Enlightenment, which stressed involvement by government in the economy.

The only time the Founders cared about providing some kind of health care plan was directed towards a particular group of citizens in the late eighteenth century, as I wrote about in this post.

What is now called the Public Health Service began as a government-sponsored, health plan for merchant sailors on ships entering and leaving US ports and on inland waterways. It was never challenged in the Supreme Court as unconstitutional, nor was it ever attacked by members of the opposition party. In fact, it was supported by both Federalists and Anti-Federalist politicians of the day.

The third reason why we don’t have universal, single-payer is because the government allowed employers to provide coverage during WWII to attract women into the workplace when the men went overseas. The UK is often cited as an example for single-payer, but what most supporters of this type of plan do not realize is that because of the devastation the UK suffered at the hands of German bombs, their health care system needed to be re-built from scratch, so the government stepped in with the NHS. Even Churchill supported it.

Fourth, we have always provided health care to certain at risk groups like the poor (Medicaid), the elderly (Medicare), and to children (CHIP), as well as to former service persons and their families (Tricare), etc. Perhaps the way to begin to get universal coverage is to merge all of these programs into one, then expand it to cover everyone else.

But for the time being, a major disaster was averted, but we should not think this is the end of the debate, nor is there victory. The battle lines are drawn, and the enemy is not surrendering. This is not a time for congratulation, but for vigilance and resolve.

 

Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don’t

“You can always count on Americans to do the right thing – after they’ve tried everything else.”

Winston Churchill

“Our policy is to create a national health service in order to ensure that everybody in the country irrespective of means, age, sex or occupation shall have equal opportunities to benefit from the best and most up-to-date medical and allied services available.

Winston Churchill

 

Veering away from the usual topics covered in this blog, I thought about some recent articles I saw about the attempt to repeal and replace, or to simply repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which the current political regime wants to do.

The first article, in yesterday’s [failing] New York Times, warned that repealing the ACA would make it harder for people to retire early. Those who retire early, before reaching 65, can get retiree coverage from their former employers, but not many companies offer that coverage.

Those early retirees poor enough could turn to Medicaid, and everyone else would have to go to the individual market. Without the ACA, health care coverage would be more difficult to get, cost consumers more where available, and provide fewer benefits.

According to the article, if the ACA is repealed, retiring early would become less feasible for many Americans. This is called job-lock, or the need to maintain a job to get health insurance.

This is one of the concerns the ACA was supposed to address, in that it would reduce or eliminate job lock. Repealing the law could, according to the article, affect employment and retirement decisions.

The second article, from Joe Paduda, also from yesterday, reported that improving healthcare will hurt the economy, and Joe lays out the arguments for doing something or doing nothing to improve health care and what effect they would have on economic growth.

For example, Joe states that healthcare employs 15.5 million full time workers, or 1 out of every 9 job. In two years, this will surpass retail employment. As Joe rightly points out, those jobs are funded by employers and taxpayers. He suggests that some experts argue that healthcare is “crowding out” economic expansion in other sectors, thereby hurting growth overall.

But Joe also points out that by controlling health care costs, employment will be cut, and stock prices for pharmaceutical companies, margins for medical device firms, and bonuses at health plans will also be affected.

So, if cost control and increasing efficiency works, these lost jobs, reduced profits, and lower margins, Joe says, will hurt the economy. The economy will suffer if the health care sector is more efficient, and since healthcare is also a huge employment generator and an inefficient industry, fixing that inefficiency will reduce employment and growth.

Thus, the title of this article, “Damned if you do, damned if you don’t.”

But wait, there’s more.

Yesterday, a certain quote has been making the rounds through the media. It was uttered by Number 45. “Nobody knew health care could be so complicated.”

Yes, it is complicated and complex, but does it have to be so? If we consider the second Churchill quote above, and realize that the UK, France, Germany, Canada, and many other Western countries have some form of single payer, then one must conclude that it is only the US that has complicated and made too complex, the providing of health care to all of its citizens.

There are many reasons for this, which is beyond the scope of this article or blog, but there is one overriding reason for this complexity…GREED. Not the greed of wanting more of one thing, but the greed of profit, as one executive from an insurance company stated recently.

This brings me to the last of the articles I ran across yesterday. It was posted on LinkedIn by Dave Chase, founder of the Health Rosetta Institute. He cited a segment on the Fox News Channel’s Tucker Carlson program, in which Carlson interviewed a former hospital president who said that pricing was the main problem with the US healthcare system.

Mr. Chase does not solely rely on Carlson’s guest in his article, but cites other experts in the field as evidence that pricing failure is to blame.

If we are to except this as true, then it buttresses my point that the overriding problem is greed, for what else is the failure to control prices but a symptom of greed inherent in the American health care system, and something that does not exist elsewhere in the Western world.

Which brings me to Churchill’s first quote above. Since we Americans have tried the free market system of health care wanting, and have tried a reformed free market system, perhaps it is time to go all the way to a government-sponsored, Medicare for All, single payer system.

The bottom line is: we’re damned if we do, damned if we don’t. The question is, which is the lesser of two evils.

UPDATE: Here is Joe’s take on what will happen to the ACA in the next two years. I agree with his assessment.

Fam Tours for Self-Insured Employers

The subject of medical travel for self-insured employers is one that this blog has rarely discussed from the point of view of the medical travel facility.

Previous posts here have discussed a possible scenario for medical travel by self-insured employers under workers’ comp, the experience of one company that did so for its employees under their group health plan, and why self-insured employers are failing to adopt medical travel, as well as other posts that briefly mentioned self-insured employers.

Yet, at no time has this reviewer, in the position of content writer, ever discussed how the medical travel facilities can market their services to potential self-insured customers.

A new book by Maria Todd, her sixteenth in fact, does exactly that. Organizing Medical Tourism Site Inspections for Self-Insured Employers is a well-written manual for medical travel facilities seeking to highlight the services they offer by hosting site inspections, or more colloquially known as “fam tours,” or familiarizing tours.

Note: This writer had participated in only one fam tour to medical facilities when I spoke at a medical tourism conference in Mexico in 2014.

Knowing the Customer

Dr. Todd’s book focuses on the ways medical travel facilities can know their customers by knowing which self-insured employers are more likely to develop a medical travel program for their plan beneficiaries, and the criteria the Plan Administrators will look for to engage their services and the conditions under which such travel is possible.

One example given is if flying time to a medical tourism destination is less than three hours by plane. For American workers, who have US passports, longer distances would eliminate travel to parts of Asia, the Middle East, parts of South America, and Russia. Such locations would be possible if the employees were working there or nearby, and they were the closest facilities available.

She also discusses what will attract multinational employers who have workers around the world to select facilities that can handle industrial accidents, as well as general health and rehabilitative services. Some employers may be self-insured for their domestic employees, but purchase an insurance cover called an International Private Medical Insurance, or “IPMI.”

Selling Solutions

To educate hospital executives and managers on how to sell solutions to Plan Administrators, Dr. Todd includes a chapter on a topic she says executives and managers often do not consider important.

The chapter focuses on what not to say or do when conducting a site inspection. You, as the seller might consider certain areas of your facility important to highlight, or is one that you take pride in, but may not be something your guests are particularly interested in.

One such area is Accreditation. Not knowing abbreviations for accrediting organizations such as the Joint Commission International (JCI), or what the big deal is about accreditation, is something the executives and managers need to be aware of beforehand and to be prepared to explain why it is important.

Proper accreditation will go a long way to ease their minds over deciding to use that facility, and being presented with an unfamiliar or disreputable accreditor, or one whose certificates are not worth the paper they are printed on, is something to be aware of also.

Another area of concern when hosting a site inspection is scientific presentations. It is quite possible that some of your guests may be physicians and nurses who will benefit from seeing such presentations, but for those Plan Administrators who are not medical personnel, such tours maybe considerably boring, if not completely too technical for them to comprehend.

Technology Tours

A similar mistake made is taking business-focused guests to see the technology the facility has installed and uses. Dr. Todd recommends they create a spreadsheet of the expensive equipment they have and write a short blurb about each.

Her main point is this: Plan Administrators are seeking three things: transparency, good value, and superb, culturally-sensitive customer service.

Other areas to avoid on Fam tours

The Emergency Department, laboratory, radiology and imaging department, cardiac catheterization lab, and the PET/CT, and PACU’s are a waste of time, per Dr. Todd, and may even disturb the patient’s privacy and recovery.

Final five chapters

The final five chapters deal with developing relationships, the contracting and provider network criteria (where to get preliminary data, contract terms and payment agreements, and avoiding payment hassles with the right language), the basics of ERISA (ERISA fiduciary responsibilities, self-insurance plan sponsorship not limited to the US, and government employers pay for healthcare services outside of their countries), how to prepare for site inspections, and lastly, rate proposals.

Closing

Dr. Todd’s book is a must for any self-insured employer considering a medical travel program for their beneficiaries. For those employers who self-insure for general health care, this book provides them with the knowledge they need to have to explore doing so. For those self-insured employers who self-insure for workers’ comp, this too is an important book.

The likelihood that the Affordable Care Act will be repealed or replaced, with something worse, or with nothing at all, grows stronger every day now. Once that happens, premiums will rise, and alternatives such as medical travel will seem much more plausible and cost-effective.

While this book was written from the perspective of the seller of healthcare services, purchasers of such services, either domestically or internationally, can benefit from reading it. Not knowing what to look for will only cost you time and money and be harmful to the health of your plan and your employees. I highly recommend this book to you.

Interesting Article on PPO’s

Forbes.com has published an extensive article claiming that PPO’s have perpetrated a great heist [author’s words] on the American middle class.

According to the article,  trillions has been redistributed from the American workforce to the healthcare industry, creating an economic depression for the middle class.

The article consists of an interview conducted by author Dave Chase and Mike Dendy, Vice Chairman and CEO of Advanced Medical Pricing Solutions, Inc., a healthcare cost management company.

Here is the link to the full article:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/davechase/2016/09/05/have-ppo-networks-perpetrated-the-greatest-heist-in-american-history/#25489cd66d00

Is it any wonder why work comp is also so screwed up? Too many cooks (or is that crooks?) taking their “cut” out of the middle class.

But we keep insisting that we have the best health care system in the world, that our workers get the best care when they are injured and don’t need to have any alternatives explored to improve the care and treatment they get, and that the free market is the best way to provide health care. It’s free alright. Free for the greedy to become more greedy. But not for you and me.

ERISA, Stop Loss and Unintended Consequences

“The problems of the world cannot possibly be solved by skeptics or cynics whose horizons are limited by the obvious realities. We need men who can dream of things that never were.”

John F. Kennedy

“Some men see things as they are and say why. I dream things that never were and say why not.”

Robert F. Kennedy

“It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, it is because we do not dare that things are difficult.”

Seneca

Those quotes were included at the top of my June 19, 2013 post, “Clearing the Air: My Defense of Implementing Medical Tourism into Workers’ Compensation” where I defended myself against the charge that I was offering “simplistic solutions” to medical travel and workers’ comp. In that post, and in “The Faith of My Conviction: Integrating Medical Tourism into Workers’ Compensation is Possible and is not a Pipe Dream” I acknowledge that is won’t be easy, but there are ways to do it.

In my last post, “Self-Insured Employers Fail To Adopt Medical Travel“, I discussed the reasons given by Irving Stackpole for why US employers have failed to adopt medical travel into their corporate health plans.

In conversations with a noted ERISA and medical travel expert, I have been making the case that laws and regulations such as ERISA, Stop Loss, and other “barriers” erected decades ago, in order to address specific problems such as tort claims, aggregate claim losses, etc., have the unintended consequence of holding back the globalization of health care, which includes workers’ comp.

I have addressed the legal barriers in comp in my White Paper, and found that there were outdated federal and state laws and regulations, intended to protect consumers, actually increase costs and reduce convenience, restrict public providers from outsourcing certain expensive medical procedures, and that federal laws inhibit collaboration, while state licensing laws prevent certain medical tasks being performed by providers in other countries.

Let me state here that I, in no way, am advocating the removal of these laws and regulations. My chief argument is this: our best minds have split atoms, launched satellites and men into space, discovered cures for diseases plaguing humans for centuries, but to send patients to other countries for medical care is impossible, and not worth pursuing, smacks of cowardice or fear that it actually might save money and provide better care. Do we not have the best minds to figure out how to deal with these “barriers”, or are we too fearful and litiginous a society that we have given up accepting new ideas?

Every industry is being affected by two powerful forces today: globalization and automation. With globalization, jobs, plants and other forms of capital are moving across borders. With automation, jobs that were once held by humans and considered very dangerous, are being done by robots, and soon other jobs will be done by artificial intelligence.

Neither force can be stopped, and how we address the consequences of these forces is what many minds are working on right now. But to say that one industry is going to draw a line in the sand and say, “NO” and stop globalization from happening is either insanity or a deliberate attempt to profit from the maintenance of the status quo that many along the supply chain of medical care services, both within the general health care space and workers’ comp have carved out for themselves.

When I was in college, I studied International Relations, and back then, globalization was a word very few outside of academia ever heard. There was an organization created in 1973 by David Rockefeller and Zbigniew Brzezinski called the Trilateral Commission. Its purpose was to foster better cooperation between the countries in North America, Western Europe and Japan (the Trilateral countries) and their multinational corporations. In the ensuing decades, the Commission expanded the membership to the rest of the world, and globalization became a household word.

Coincidence? I think not, since the heads of major US, Western European, and Japanese companies were members, and so were many politicians, including a former peanut farmer from Georgia and most of his top administration personnel. Other politicians after him also have been members, from both sides of the political spectrum.

Their chief goal is to allow capital, goods and jobs to cross national borders, or to eliminate them altogether, and I doubt they expected the health care industry to stand in their way. These are men who generally get what they want, and damn the consequences. We see this in the breakup of the European Union, which many of them advocated for years, just like they advocated for NAFTA, CAFTA, the TPP, and other trade deals, and don’t give a fig about the impact they have.

So, it is important to realize that the only real thing preventing medical travel is what unintended consequences have on the growth and development of the industry. This is where the industry needs to focus its attention, not on slick advertising, but on hard work and cooperation to overcome these “barriers”.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Comp Blog is now viewed all over the world in over 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

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