Category Archives: Health Care

Universal healthcare could save America trillions: what’s holding us back? | Opinion | The Guardian

More fuel to the fire on single payer from The Guardian, as a follow-up to my two previous posts on the subject, Healthcare Lobbying Group Double-Crossing Democratic Voters and Establishment looks to crush liberals on Medicare for All – POLITICO.

A slew of studies are confirming that America can afford real universal healthcare, but some call it economically infeasible

Source: Universal healthcare could save America trillions: what’s holding us back? | Opinion | The Guardian

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One Implant, Two Prices. It Depends On Who’s Paying. | Kaiser Health News

Here is another example of our broken health care system and the way in which health care has become a cash cow for hospitals, physicians, medical device manufacturers, which includes implant manufacturers, and pharmaceutical companies.

The following article from Kaiser Health News is eerily familiar to a piece I wrote a while back about a man who needed a hip replacement, and went to Belgium to get it, and discovered that the hip they gave him was made near his home in the US, but was considerably cheaper in Belgium than in the US, even though it was the same hip he would have gotten if he had the surgery locally.

That the same implant should come with two different costs, either because it is implanted in the US, or in a foreign country, or in the case below, because of the type of surgeries performed, is illogical and a symptom of a dysfunctional, profit-driven health care system that is out of control.

Here is the article link:

Breast implants — used for both cancer and cosmetic surgeries — give a glimpse into how hospitals mark up prices of medical devices to increase their bottom lines.

Source: One Implant, Two Prices. It Depends On Who’s Paying. | Kaiser Health News

Health Insurance Costs Accelerating for Workers | HealthLeaders Media

This is a follow-up to my previous post, Health Care Costs Rising for Workers. My post then cited a Kaiser study; this article references the University of Minnesota’s State Health Access Data Assistance Center.

On Monday, I reported that there is an effort underway to discredit the move towards single payer by various groups, and even Howard Schultz, the outgoing Chairman of Starbucks said the following back in June:

“It concerns me that so many voices within the Democratic Party are going so far to the left. I say to myself, ‘How are we going to pay for these things,’ in terms of things like single payer [and] people espousing the fact that the government is going to give everyone a job. I don’t think that’s something realistic. I think we got to get away from these falsehoods and start talking about the truth and not false promises.”

So, if these two studies are accurate, and there is no way to prove they aren’t, then both Mr. Schultz and the various groups attempting to derail single payer, are only going to make things worse for workers, and for everyone else.

Oh, and by the way, there have been studies that indicated that we could afford single payer health care, especially a report sponsored by a Koch Brothers backed think tank, Mercatus.

So, consider the following from this Health Leaders article back in October of this year.

The average premium for employer-sponsored plans rose $267, or 4.4% between 2016 and 2017, which is twice the increase recorded between 2015 and 2016.

Source: Health Insurance Costs Accelerating for Workers | HealthLeaders Media

Establishment looks to crush liberals on Medicare for All – POLITICO

FYI to all Progressives and Medicare for All supporters:

The coalition that fought Obamacare repeal has fragmented as the party tries to follow through on campaign promises.

Source: Establishment looks to crush liberals on Medicare for All – POLITICO

Employer Insurance Costs Growing Burden for Middle Class

The Commonwealth Fund today released a report that stated that the cost of employer-based insurance is a growing burden on middle-class families.

In 2017, more than half (56%) of people under age 65, about 152 million people, had insurance through an employer, either their own or a family member’s. In contrast, only 9 percent had a plan purchased on the individual market, including the marketplaces.

Here are the highlights from that brief:

Highlights

* After climbing modestly between 2011 and 2016, average premiums for employer health plans rose sharply in 2017. Annual single-person premiums climbed above $7,000 in eight states; family premiums were $20,000 or higher in seven states and D.C.

* Rising overall employer premiums increased the amount that workers and their families contribute. Average annual premium contributions for single-person plans ranged from $675 in Hawaii to $1,747 in Massachusetts; family plans ranged from $3,646 in Michigan to $6,533 in Delaware.

* Average employee premium contributions across single and family plans amounted to 6.9 percent of U.S. median income in 2017, up from 5.1 percent in 2008. In 11 states, premium contributions were 8 percent of median income or more, with a high of 10.2 percent in Louisiana.

* The average annual deductible for single-person policies rose to $1,808 in 2017, ranging from a low of $863 in Hawaii to a high of about $2,300 in Maine and New Hampshire. Average deductibles across single and family plans amounted to 4.8 percent of median income in 2017, up from 2.7 percent in 2008. In three states (Florida, Mississippi, and Tennessee), average deductibles comprised more than 6 percent of median income.

* Combined, average employee premium contributions and potential out-of-pocket spending to meet deductibles across single and family policies rose to $7,240 in 2017 and was $8,000 or more in eight states. Nationally, this potential spending amounted to 11.7 percent of median income in 2017, up from 7.8 percent a decade earlier. In Louisiana and Mississippi, these combined costs rose to 15 percent or more of median income.

Worker payments for employer coverage are growing faster than median income.

The average employee premium cost across single and family plans amounted to 6.9 percent of median income in 2017, up from 5.1 percent in 2008.

Average deductibles are also outpacing growth in median income.

In many states, even though costs are rising, people are not getting insurance that protects them more because deductibles are also increasing.

Still think that the free market works for health care? Guess again.

We are the only advanced nation that refuses to give its citizens universal health care like other similar nations do. This “growth” is unsustainable and will lead to single-payer health care.

 

National Health Care Spending In 2017: Growth Slows To Post–Great Recession Rates; Share Of GDP Stabilizes | Health Affairs

Yesterday, Health Affairs reported that spending on health care was slowing to post-Great Recession rates, and that its share of GDP stabilized. However, total nominal US health care spending increased 3.9 percent to $3.5 trillion in 2017, slowing from growth of 4.8 percent in 2016.

Yet, the authors stated that, “For a health sector that now accounts for nearly one-fifth of the US economy, future increases in health care expenditures will likely lead to policy decisions focused on affordability and sustainability.”

What are those policy decisions that will focus on affordability and sustainability? Single Payer, Medicare for All so that all Americans are covered, and receive all medical care they need without having to go into bankruptcy or to set up a “GoFund Me” account, or other similar application.

Just because the spending slowed to pre-Recession rates does not mean we are in the clear and all will be right with the health care world. As happens when we graph any statistics, there will always be a point in time when what looks like good news turns bad, and when bad news turns good. One day the market is up, the next it is down. That’s why they are depicted with lines instead of bars or circles or other graphic designs.

Source: National Health Care Spending In 2017: Growth Slows To Post–Great Recession Rates; Share Of GDP Stabilizes | Health Affairs

The Road to Recovery: Post-Acute Care in Workers Compensation

The following is directed towards all those engaged in medical travel and have been following my blog for some time. Sorry I haven’t been writing in a while. I either did not see anything to write about, or just wasn’t in the mood.

But the article below should be of extreme interest to all of you who deal with post-acute care and after care, even though you are not involved as of yet in workers’ comp.

As the original focus of the blog was transforming workers’ comp, this should be read by those of you who have followed my ideas on the subject. Let me know what you think.

NCCI, for those of you not familiar with them, is the organization responsible for collecting and distributing data about the American workers’ comp industry, what is driving the costs of comp, and of claims, and other financial data relevant to the industry’s function.

Here is the link to their article:

Source: The Road to Recovery: Post-Acute Care in Workers Compensation