Category Archives: Global Health Care Services

Ashley Furniture and Medical Travel, part 2

As promised last month, here is the Spotlight article from Medical Travel Today.com about Ashley Furniture’s foray into Medical Travel for their employees.

In case you missed it, here is the link to part 1 of the article.

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Foreign Patients Get Liver Transplants in US Hospitals First

ProPublica, those lovely folks who published several articles some time back on workers’ comp, are at it again.

This time, they are focusing their ire on how foreign patients are getting liver transplants at some US hospitals ahead of Americans waiting for such transplants.

The story, published yesterday, was co-published with a local Fox station in New Orleans.

From 2013 to 2016, New York-Presbyterian Hospital gave 20 livers to foreign nationals who came to the US solely for a transplant, essentially exporting the organs and removing them from the pool of available livers to New Yorkers.

Dr. Herbert Pardes (I was familiar with his name from living in NY), wrote that, “Patients in equal need of a liver transplant should not have to wait and suffer differently because of the U.S. state where they reside.”

Dr, Pardes was the former chief executive, and is now the executive vice president of the board at New York-Presbyterian.

Yet, according to the story, Dr. Pardes left out NY-P’s contribution to the shortage, as stated above from 2013 to 2016.

These 20 livers represent 5.2 percent of the hospital’s liver transplants during that time, which was one of the highest ratios in the country.

ProPublica reported that unknown to the public, or to sick patients and their families, organs donated domestically are sometimes given to patients flying in from other countries, who often pay a premium. Some hospitals even seek them out.

A company from Saudi Arabia said it signed an agreement with Ochsner Medical Center in New Orleans in 2015.

The practice is legal, according to the story, and foreign nationals must wait their turn in the same way as domestic patients. The transplant centers justify this on medical and humanitarian grounds, but at a time when we have an Administration touting “America First”, this may run counter to the national mood.

The  director of the transplant institute at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, Dr. Sander Florman, said he struggles with “in essence, selling the organs we do have to foreign nationals with bushels of money.”

Between 2013 and 2016, 252 foreigners came to the US purely to receive livers at American hospitals. In 2016, the most recent year for which there is data, the majority of foreign recipients were from countries in the Middle East, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Israel and the UAE. Another 100 foreigners staying in the US as non-residents also received livers.

At the same time, more than 14,000 people, nearly all Americans, are waiting for livers, a figure that has remained very high for decades, they report. By comparison, fewer than 8,000 liver transplants were performed last year in the US, an all-time high. National median wait time is more than 14 months, and in NY, the time is longer.

In 2016. more than 2.600 patients were removed from waiting lists nationally, either because they died or were too sick to receive a liver transplant.

All this is happening at a time when the party in power is seeking to take health care away from those who recently received care for the first time in a long time from the ACA, and at a time when the medical travel industry is focused not on transplant surgeries, but on boutique treatments and surgeries for wealthy or upper middle class Americans to go abroad for bariatric, plastic or reconstructive surgery, knee surgery, dental care, etc.

And yet, when the very idea of medical travel is broached in the medical community, it is disparaged and discouraged by physicians and others as unsafe, impractical, and not worth the effort, Obviously, it is well worth the effort on the part of foreign patients to come here and take organs meant for Americans, so why not allow Americans to take their organs?

Is it because the hospitals that supply these organs to foreign patients are making huge sums of money, and the poor schnook American with liver disease (or kidney disease, as in the case of yours truly) must die so that an American hospital can improve its bottom line?

It is high time to cut the crap and promote medical travel the right way and for the right reasons, not only for those who can afford it, but those who need transplants and can’t get them here.

That is the true nature of the globalization of healthcare…a two-way street.

 

Global Medical Tourism Industry Market Analysis

Note: The following is a re-print from U.S. Domestic Medical Travel.com, one of two publications from CPR Strategic Marketing Communications. They also publish Medical Travel Today.com, and both publications have re-printed several of my posts on both of their newsletters, so I am returning the favor, which they have paid me many times over. I do not vouch for the accuracy of the data in the article, so please address any comments to the author.

Here is the article:

Global Medical Tourism Market By Treatment Type and by Region – Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth Trends and Forecasts (2016 – 2021)

The global medical tourism market has been estimated to be valued at USD 14,278 million, and it is anticipated to reach a market value of USD 21,380 million by the end of 2021 at a projected CAGR of 8.41% during the forecast period, 2016 to 2021.

Medical tourism involves travelling to another country for obtaining medical treatment. It is a high-growth industry driven by globalization and rising healthcare costs in the developed countries. A study shows that in United States, about 750,000 residents travel abroad for healthcare each year. A range of governments across the globe has taken up various initiatives to stimulate and improve the medical tourism in the respective countries in order to improve patient care and help expand the market. Many countries could see potential for significant economic development in the emergent field of medical tourism. Cosmetic surgery, dental care, elective surgery, fertility treatments, cardiovascular surgery and genetic disorder treatments are the most preferred healthcare treatments in this sector.

High cost of medical treatment in the developed countries and availability of those treatments at a lower cost in other countries have fueled the development of medical tourism. In addition, the availability of latest medical technologies and a growing compliance on international quality standards drive this market. The use of English as the main working language solves the problem of communication and patient satisfaction, adding to the growth of this market. Enhanced patient care, health insurance portability, advertising and marketing help the medical tourism industry to grow at a fast rate. On the other hand, infection outbreaks during or after travel, issues in following up with the patients before returning to their own country, and medical record transfer issues are the factors restraining the growth of the tourism industry. However, the unavailability of certain treatments at a lower cost hampers this market more than any other factors.

The global market for the medical tourism industry is segmented based on treatment type (cosmetic treatment, dental treatment, cardiovascular treatment, orthopedics treatment, bariatric surgery, fertility treatment, eye surgery and general treatment) and geographical regions. Cosmetic treatments hold the largest market share, as cosmetic surgeries are not covered by insurance.

Based on geography, the market is segmented into North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. APAC holds the largest market share, followed by Europe. Thailand and Malaysia are strong markets with prospect for significant growth, followed by Korea.

The key players in the global medical tourism market are Bangkok Hospital Medical Center, Asian Heart Institute, Apollo Hospitals Enterprise Ltd., Bumrungrad International Hospital, Fortis Healthcare Ltd., Min-Sheng General Hospital, Raffles Medical Group, Prince Court Medical Center, KPJ Healthcare Berhad, and Samitivej Sukhumvit.

For more information please click on:
http://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/mkptu7l/4109970

Foreign-born Workers on the Rise: What it Means for Work Comp and Medical Travel

Working Immigrants.com posted a report this weekend that indicated that the percentage of foreign-born workers in the US will rise from 16% to 20% of the workforce over the next 26 years.

It will grow for the next 15 years, then the pace will slow considerably. Citing a Census Bureau publication from March 2015, Working Immigrants said that the total population of the US is expected to grow from about 319 million in 2014, to 359 million in 2030, and 380 million in 2040, which is an increase of 19% over the next 26 years.

According to the report, the working age population will grow by 12%.

There is a higher rate of employment among foreign-born, due to the fact that they mainly come here to work, and they are more concentrated in working age brackets ― 80% between 18 and 64, vs 62% among native born.

Modest increases in the foreign-born population will result in higher shares of employment for these workers.

By 2040, foreign-born workers will be one fifth of the workforce.

It is a given that not many of these workers will have a great command of English, and the most likely foreign-born workers will be Hispanics and Asians.

A workforce that does not have a command of English, is mainly from Central and South America and Asia, will no doubt put a strain on an already strained social welfare system, especially workers’ comp, since they are more likely to be injured on the job.

So those of you in the medical travel industry looking for patients and trying to entice well-off Americans down to Latin America for dental work, cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery, and other treatments not available in the US or that are too expensive, should consider expanding your offerings to your fellow Latino immigrants, or change direction and consider doing so by offering to facilitate less expensive surgeries for common injuries found in the workers’ comp space.

And those of you in workers’ comp who have shut your minds to new ideas and refuse to listen to what I am saying, either should learn Spanish or Chinese, or deal with the changing nature of health care globally, and stop worrying about stepping on the toes of the vested interests, and start thinking about the interests of all those new foreign-born workers who will be coming here in the next 26 years (24 now that it is 2016).

They may not feel comfortable going to a hospital for surgery if the staff there does not speak their language, or the food is unfamiliar, and they may even recover faster if they know they are surrounded by friends and family in their home country. That will lead to a more productive and happier employee.

And a happier employee will improve your bottom line.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Will accept invitations to speak or attend conferences.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Comp Blog is now viewed all over the world in over 250 countries and political entities. I have published 300 articles and counting, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Cut the C**P!

For my 300th article, I want to address the medical travel industry and its failure to rid itself of the crooks, liars, shysters, and phonies who prey upon the desperate.

Case in point, the article last Wednesday in the New York Times by Gail Kolata about one man’s experience getting stem cell therapy through medical travel.

This case is endemic of the industry’s impotence to police itself and get rid of those medical providers and hucksters who use slick promotional material to sell useless and often dangerous treatments or dubious procedures.

But what do you expect from an industry whose major organization is merely a conduit for funneling money into the pockets of the organization’s founders and their friends?

What do you expect from an industry that emphasizes attending conferences and not on standardizing the laws and processes for the provision of medical care across national borders.

When I started this blog over three years ago, I had high hopes that the industry would listen to what I had to say, and to at least consider offering medical travel to injured workers in the US. But as happened with the workers’ comp industry, no one has stepped up and offered to work with me.

I’m not mad at everyone in the industry. Many of you are very nice people and work very hard, but your focus is on such medical care as dentistry, cancer, cosmetic/plastic surgery, and other treatments not available in the US, or too expensive.

But helping those who are injured on the job, and many of whom are from many of the countries in this hemisphere who offer medical travel services, should be something some of you might want to do.

It was my hope that this industry would offer me a chance to change direction, but that has not happened, and now I am not sure if it ever will.  There does not seem to be any financial or employment opportunities here, just a lot of conferences and hyperbole.

Prove me wrong.


I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp.

I am also looking for a partner who shares my vision of global health care for injured workers.

I am also willing to work with any health care provider, medical tourism facilitator or facility to help you take advantage of a market segment treating workers injured on the job. Workers’ compensation is going through dramatic changes, and may one day be folded into general health care. Injured workers needing surgery for compensable injuries will need to seek alternatives that provide quality medical care at lower cost to their employers. Caribbean and Latin America region preferred.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com.

Connect with me on LinkedIn, check out my website, FutureComp Consulting, and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com.

Transforming Workers’ Comp Blog is now viewed all over the world in over 250 countries and political entities. I have published nearly 300 articles, many of them re-published in newsletters and other blogs.

Share this article, or leave a comment below.

RESISTANCE IS FUTILE!: What is the reason behind Medical Tourism’s Rejection?

My friend, Maria Todd, PhD, noted International Expert on Healthcare & Health Tourism Business Strategies & Operations, Business Owner, Author, and Speaker, has written a very cogent and to the point article challenging American hospitals on why they eschew inbound medical tourism.

For the uninitiated, inbound medical tourism, or travel, refers to foreign patients traveling to the US or other countries for medical care from their home country.

A case in point was the late, and not lamented, Shah of Iran who was allowed to come to the US for treatment of his cancer, and which led to the taking hostage of our embassy staff, destroying what was left of one presidential administration, and secretly aiding another to win the election, and thus look good in the eyes of the American people, only some time later to that administration selling arms to Iran for other hostages, the cash then used to support the Contras in Nicaragua.

But I digress.

As the Shah had money, he was welcomed with open arms, but Maria wonders why other American hospitals, knowing that they will receive cash, still refuses to seek out inbound medical tourism as an alternative source of revenue.

According to Dr. Todd, “It is estimated that the USA is the 3rd most popular destination for inbound medical tourism from other countries, but the practice of traveling for health has been a “thing” in the USA for more than 100 years.

Corporations such as Pepsico, Lowe’s Home Improvement, Boeing, WalMart and many other corporations, she writes, with self-funded health plans under ERISA, have the freedom to contract with any hospital, anywhere in the world without going through a managed care network, but can’t because the hospitals with lots of value to offer simply don’t seem interested enough to talk to them.

She wants to know why not? In order for her to find the answer to that and other questions, she is asking her colleagues in healthcare business development and business administration who are executives at leading healthcare institutions and well-equipped ASCs across America: “Why do you eschew medical tourism business?

This question, and the others that she poses in her article, also relate to outbound medical tourism as well.

Why do employers, insurance companies, the domestic health care industry, which is beset by so many problems and potential shortages and inefficiencies, as well as the entire workers’ compensation industry eschew medical travel for non-work-related illnesses and diseases, and work-related injuries requiring surgery?

I’ve written about this many times before. I have cited American Exceptionalism, racism, xenophobia, greed, ignorance of the quality of medical care abroad, and many other factors, but as Maria points out for US hospitals turning down cash patients, employers and carriers can save money by looking outside our broken and dysfunctional medical care system under workers’ comp.

It’s high time the US joins the rest of the world, and allows our citizens the freedom to go wherever they want for medical care, no matter what the cause, or condition that prompts them to seek medical care that is high quality, and will save money for their employer, and provide them an opportunity to see the world that also belongs to them.

Not to do so is tantamount to enslavement to a corrupt and rigged system that benefits unscrupulous physicians, pharmacies, pain management centers, and other workers’ comp service providers, and harms injured workers.

Medical travel will happen. Resist at your peril.

Angry People Buy Guns, Smart People Write Articles

While perusing my email today, I chanced upon the scriblings of the self-styled, right-winger who had called medical travel a hoax and my idea a non-starter.

This individual saw fit to announce to the world that he had recently purchased 1000 rounds of ammunition, and said that it was for him and his wife.

The point of his rantings was something about letting in new ideas into workers’ comp, and called me an angry man. Funny, if I am angry, then how come he’s the one who bought ammo?

It must be obvious that he is the angry one, just like all the rest of his kind who shoot first (their mouths, then their guns) and ask questions later.

One is not angry if they advocate for an idea they believe will benefit injured workers, when the person calling you angry, buys 1000 rounds of ammo. One is visionary and forward-thinking, unlike the gun nut who shoots his mouth and gun off.

I am not really worried. You see, one day, he will be dead, and hopefully so will his outright hatred and disgust for medical care outside the “good ole US of A”, where we all know only Americans are good at providing quality medical care.

And I also know that when the space plane is made available later in this century for commercial flights, traveling to “Turkishmaninacanstan” will take no more time than going from NYC to Washington, DC, and maybe even less so.

No, the really angry man is the one who, making up for his shortcomings, both physical and mental, needs to buy 1000 rounds of ammunition to hold off new ideas in workers’ comp. Why? So that the status quo stays the status quo.

Or maybe, the only new ideas he likes are the ones that conform to his racist, bigoted, xenophobic hysteria, and that is why he needs 1000 rounds of ammo.