Category Archives: facilitators

The Seven “C’s” of Medical Travel: What Workers’ Compsters Need to Know

If you thought I had abandoned talking about workers’ comp and medical travel, guess again. It was on the back burner waiting for the right time to come forward once again.

This time, it is due to one of my LinkedIn connections, Arlen Meyers, MD, MBA. Dr. Meyers is the President and CEO at the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs.

Dr. Meyers published a medical traveler’s check list which he calls his “7 C’s”. He advises medical travelers to complete the checklist before going abroad for medical care.

For those of you in comp who have been skeptical about the practicality and efficacy of medical travel, this checklist is intended to prove that what medical travel really is, is not some quack form of medicine or third world medicine in some dump of a hospital or clinic.

Here is Dr. Meyers checklist:

  1. Credentials: Check the quality of your surgeon and the facility where they intend to do your surgery. Be sure the hospital or ambulatory surgery center is accredited by a recognized accreditation organization. The table stakes for the surgeon are licensure in the state or country, board certification and a lack of repeated malpractice or disciplinary actions. Harder, if not impossible, to find will be a record of the surgeon’s outcomes for a given procedure, so you will have to rely on referral from a trusted source or recommendations. Online site reviews do not reflect quality of outcomes.
  2. Cost: How and how much will you be expected to pay for your operation? If something goes wrong, who is responsible for paying future care? What will be covered and what won’t? Is there insurance, for example medical evacuation in case of a dire emergency, you can buy to help defer some of the risk? Bundled payment i.e., a fixed price for specifically defined episode of care, is becoming more common.
  3. Continuity of care: In the best case, a doctor at home will help you to find a surgeon away from home and will accept you back as a patient once you return home. However, many surgeons are reluctant to do that so be sure you have a plan for continuity of care when you get home. Find out who will take care of you if, and when your surgeon is not available. If something goes wrong during a procedure in an ambulatory surgery center, where will you be transferred for care? Be sure you understand where you should go for emergency care when you get back home and whether your insurance company, if applicable, will cover the cost.
  4. Care coordination: Leaving home can involve not just medical issues, but travel and hospitality issues as well, e.g., customs and immigration forms, translation services, hotel and flight arrangements, and accommodations for companions or family members.
  5. Companion: Be sure you travel with a trusted, reliable companion or family member who can help and support you during your postoperative recovery. Another option is to hire a trained medical profession, like a nurse, who will accompany you on your trip for a fee.
  6. Continuity of data: Be sure you obtain a copy of your medical records, discharge summary and operative note. Do not rely on the surgeon transmitting the information to your doctor back home. Medical records are not interoperable in the best of circumstances and, most likely, sending reports and forms from a distant place will be a hassle, inefficient and expensive.
  7. Contraindications: Here are some medical conditions that are contraindications to flying.

This is not some slick marketing tool created by a medical travel facilitator or promoter. This is a reasoned, carefully constructed checklist written by a medical doctor advising potential patients of foreign medical providers and facilities what to do, what to look for, and what to expect when going abroad for medical care.

Those of you who have criticized my idea in the past, and you know who you are, should be aware that there are real professional people who strive to do the right thing, even if that means that they or their domestic colleagues lose patients to fellow physicians and facilities in other countries. Dr. Meyers did not have to do this for his sake; he did it for the sake of the patient. Which is something you should be doing, instead of doing the same old thing repeatedly and expecting different results.

It is high time workers’ comp opened up and let the sunshine in. The patients will be the better for it.

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“Extreme Makeover” Surgery Leads to Death

A story from the Australian network, ABC, tells of an Australian man who went to Malaysia for cosmetic surgery, and came back with holes in his body and died.

I am posting the link here:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-12-18/medical-tourism-mother-warns-of-risk-coroner-delivers-findings/9260626

We all know there are risks to any surgery, but in the case of medical travel, one or two bad outcomes can be serious to not only the brand of the facilitator, but to the entire industry,.

Rather than conducting conferences around the world where you pat each other on the back, why don’t you call one big meeting to set out some global standards of treatment and declare that you will drive those causing harm, both facilitators and providers, out of the industry.

Stand up and make this industry safe. And stop patting each other on the back with useless certificates and awards that have no meaning to real people.