Category Archives: Employment

Eligibility Waivers to Leave Many With Costs From COVID-19

One more reason, now that COVID is causing so much unemployment, that we desparately need Medicare for All, with no qualifications other than US citizenship. We can give corporations and wealthy people billions in tax breaks, but not one red cent for people’s health care in a nationwide, single payer system that would have responded rationally and logistically to a pandemic, instead of as a “chaotic disaster.”

Health Affairs Blog

May 8, 2020

Medicaid Retroactive Eligibility Waivers Will Leave Thousands Responsible For Coronavirus Treatment Costs

By Paul Shafer  Nicole Huberfeld  Ezra Golberstein

The coronavirus pandemic has led to record numbers of American workers being laid off or seeing their hours and paychecks dwindle. The economy is on the brink of a deep recession, and waves of coronavirus infections may continue for the foreseeable future. Medicaid will be a crucial piece of the puzzle that helps to ensure access to health care while protecting people from further financial ruin. Yet, one of Medicaid’s key provisions has been weakened by recently approved section 1115 “demonstration projects”, commonly referred to as waivers, that eliminate or reduce retroactive coverage. These waivers will diminish coverage for thousands of people seeking testing and treatment for COVID-19 and other medical care.

Retroactive eligibility is a long-standing feature of Medicaid that covers health care expenses for three months prior to the application date, provided that the beneficiary would have been eligible during that period. Before the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a handful of states imposed narrow restrictions on retroactive eligibility, but these limitations were paired with expansions of eligibility and had exemptions for vulnerable groups. Recently, however, many states—including Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, and New Hampshire—have gained Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) approval for 1115 waivers that drastically limit or completely eliminate retroactive eligibility, though four have been stayed by courts or halted by states as part of litigation challenging the legality of those waivers that include work requirements (Arkansas, Kentucky, Indiana, and New Hampshire).

A core purpose of Medicaid is supporting people when they need help, which is why Medicaid has continual open enrollment and retroactive eligibility to cover the cost of care when those who are eligible aren’t already enrolled before a crisis. States should restore full retroactive eligibility immediately to protect thousands of newly-unemployed workers from even greater health and economic suffering.

https://www.healthaffairs.org/do/10.1377/hblog20200506.111318/full/

Mass Unemployment and COVID-19: What It Means for Health Insurance

Steffie Woolhandler, M.D. and David Himmelstein, M.D. wrote yesterday in the Annals of Internal Medicine that many of those who lose, or already lost their jobs due to the coronavirus pandemic have a lack of health insurance. Many did not have insurance before the outbreak, and now that they are unemployed, their employer-based insurance will end as well.

Here is the article in full:

Annals of Internal Medicine

April 7, 2020

Intersecting U.S. Epidemics: COVID-19 and Lack of Health Insurance

By Steffie Woolhandler, MD, MPH; David U. Himmelstein, MD

During the final week of March 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor reported that a record number of workers—6.648 million—filed new claims for unemployment benefits. That beat the previous record of 3.307 million filings, which was set the week before, bringing the 2-week total to 9.955 million. This is just the beginning of the surge in joblessness due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A Federal Reserve Bank economist estimated that the ranks of unemployed persons will swell by 47.05 million by the end of June.

For many, job loss will carry the added sting of losing health insurance. Congress has moved to cover severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 testing for uninsured persons, but did not include provisions to cover treatment of COVID-19 (or other illnesses). The recent $2 trillion bailout bill offered no new health insurance subsidies or coverage.

Estimating Coverage Losses

We estimated the likely effects of current job losses on the number of uninsured persons by using data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s March 2019 Current Population Survey on health insurance coverage rates among persons who lost or left a job. The uninsurance rate among unemployed persons who had lost or left a job was 26.3% versus 10.7% among those with jobs. Applying the 15.6–percentage point difference to the 9.955 million who filed new unemployment claims last week, we estimate that 1.553 million newly unemployed persons will lose health coverage. This figure excludes family members who will become uninsured because a breadwinner lost coverage and self-employed persons who may lose coverage because their businesses were shuttered, but are ineligible for unemployment benefits. If, as the Federal Reserve economist projects, an additional 47.05 million people become unemployed, 7.3 million workers (along with several million family members) are likely to join the ranks of the U.S. uninsured population.

Coverage losses are likely to be steepest in states that have turned down the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion. In expansion states, the share of persons who have lost or left a job who lacked coverage was 22.1% versus 8.3% for employed persons—a difference of 13.8 percentage points. In nonexpansion states, the uninsurance rate among such unemployed persons was 38.4% versus 15.8% for employed persons—a difference of 22.6 percentage points. In other words, nearly 1 in 4 newly unemployed workers in nonexpansion states are likely to lose coverage, bringing their overall uninsurance rate to nearly 40%.

Our projections are based on differences in coverage rates for employed and unemployed persons in 2019, but there is little reason to believe that the predicament of unemployed workers has improved since then. Although many who lose their jobs are likely to be eligible for Medicaid or subsidized Affordable Care Act coverage, and some will purchase continuing coverage under COBRA (Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act), the same was true in 2019. Indeed, the situation may be worse today because some laid-off workers probably gained coverage through an employed spouse in 2019, an option less likely to be available in the face of the impending massive layoffs.

Urgent Policy Needs and Longer-Term Solutions

With jobs and health insurance coverage disappearing as the COVID-19 pandemic rages, states that have declined to expand Medicaid should urgently reconsider. Yet, the high uninsurance rate among unemployed persons in Medicaid expansion states underlines the need for action in Washington. Tax revenues are plunging, and all states except Vermont are required to balance their budgets annually. Hence, only the federal government has the wherewithal to address the impending crisis.

Thus far, neither Congress nor the administration has offered plans to expand coverage. Some have suggested that the federal government cover COVID-19–related care for uninsured persons through Medicaid, but some states would probably decline such a Medicaid expansion, leaving many newly jobless persons—and the 28 million who were uninsured before the pandemic—without coverage. Instead, we advocate for passage of an emergency measure authorizing Medicare coverage for all persons eligible for unemployment benefits.

Although the COVID-19 crisis demands urgent action, it also exposes the imprudence of tying health insurance to employment, and the need for more thoroughgoing reform. A trickle of families facing the dual disaster of job loss and health insurance loss can remain under Washington’s radar. However, the current tsunami of job and coverage losses along with a heightened risk for severe illness demands action. A decade ago, Victor Fuchs forecasted that “National health insurance will probably come to the United States after a major change in the political climate—the kind of change that often accompanies a war, a depression, or large-scale civil unrest.” Such a major change may be upon us.

https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2764415/intersecting-u-s-epidemics-covid-19-lack-health-insurance

Medicaid Work Requirements Are Detrimental

Previous posts in this blog about Medicaid work requirements, especially in the State of Arkansas, suggested that they would be harmful to recipients of Medicaid benefits. Arkansas was the first state to implement work requirements last June.

In an exhaustive article out today from the New England Journal of Medicine, the authors found that requiring Medicaid beneficiaries to work had a detrimental effect on health insurance coverage in the initial 6 months of the policy but no significant change in employment.

Lack of awareness and confusion, the report states, about the reporting requirements were common, which may explain why thousands of persons lost coverage even though more than 95% of the target population appeared to meet the requirements or qualified for an exemption.

The conclusion of the report found that in its first 6 months, work requirements in Arkansas were associated with a significant loss of Medicaid coverage and rise in the percentage of uninsured persons.

The authors found no significant changes in employment associated with the policy, and more than 95% of persons who were targeted by the policy already met the requirement or should have been exempt.

Since the article is quite long, I have summarized the results here, but the full report can be found by clicking here.

It would appear that the goal of forcing Medicaid beneficiaries to go back to work has more downsides than upsides, but since this is being implemented by a group of puritanical, work-obsessed, economic libertarian politicians, reality has overcome their ideological disgust at giving people social benefits without expecting something in return — namely requiring low-income people to find a job in order to be covered for health care.

Isn’t it time we leave the 17th century and its puritan ethics behind and provide every American, rich or poor, with universal health care, with no strings attached? After all, that is what every other Western democracy does.

Medical Travel/Health Care Thought Leader Seeks Employment Opportunities

Medical Travel/HealthCare Thought Leader and Blogger, seeks part-time, remote employment opportunities. I am willing to speak, write, and collaborate on projects to bring about greater participation of patients to global medical travel facilities.

I am not a physician, nor do I have clients to refer to you. I offer my services in an administrative or managerial capacity.

Experience:

Over six years’ experience creating, maintaining, and analyzing current issues in Medical Travel, Health Care, and other topics.

Over six years research into the Medical Travel industry.

Promoted the implementation of medical travel into Workers’ Compensation insurance industry.

Analyzed the cost of healthcare and the options of alternative treatments abroad.

Presented White Paper to Medical Travel conference in Mexico in Nov. 2014.

Extensive experience in Insurance and Claims Management, especially in medical-related claims (Workers’ Compensation).

Strong administrative and financial skills.

Education:

Master’s in Health Administration, 2011

Interested in working remotely, willing to travel, willing to write and speak at conferences, has valid US passport.

Resume can be found here.

Blog: richardkrasner.wordpress.com

Phone number: +1 561-603-1685 (mobile)

Arkansas drops 3,815 more Medicaid enrollees over work requirement – Modern Healthcare

Modern Healthcare reported yesterday that the State of Arkansas dropped almost 4,000 of its citizens from the Medicaid expansion because of failure to comply with work requirements the state enacted months ago.

The following summary and link is provided:

Nearly 4,000 Arkansans lost their Medicaid expansion coverage in October because they didn’t comply with the state’s new work requirement. Another 8,462 low-income adults lost benefits in the previous two months.

Source: Arkansas drops 3,815 more Medicaid enrollees over work requirement – Modern Healthcare

Six Years and Counting: Yet No Opportunities

Those of you who wished me congratulations the past few weeks were told that you were a little early, as yesterday, the 29th was my actual anniversary for beginning this blog.

To refresh your memory, I began this blog three days after returning from the 5th World Medical Tourism & Global Healthcare Congress in Hollywood, Florida.

You may also have noticed that the focus of the blog has shifted from workers’ compensation and medical travel to health care, especially as the debate here in the US has gotten more attention over the ACA and Single Payer, as well as the myriad schemes some are trying to force down the throats of Americans that keep the status quo.

The blog has been viewed nearly 40,000 times over the six years, but at no time have I ever made any money from it, yet that was my intention when I began. I thought my writing would convince someone of my talent and skills. Sadly, that has not happened.

In fact, there are days where only a handful of individuals view my blog, but I push on. How long that will continue, I don’t know, or is up to you.

You’ve no doubt seen my posts for positions or opportunities, so why don’t you reach out to me.

You know where to find me.

A Personal Appeal

As you may have noticed, I have been re-posting several times articles about my interest In finding opportunities or remote/virtual positions.

To date, I have had no success. As I may have mentioned in my previous post, “Now It’s Personal“, I was diagnosed with End-Stage Renal Disease, and have been undergoing peritoneal dialysis at home.

The treatment is going well, but yesterday I began what will be a long, possibly three year process to get a transplant. As I am doing now, and will be doing in the future, I have been staying home to receive my dialysis supplies every two weeks, and going to the clinic for blood work and follow-up. In addition, I will have tests, and need to go down to Miami, so my schedule will not allow me to work full-time, or even part-time for twenty hours a week at some office.

To that end, I am interested in any work any of you can pass onto me that will utilize my skills and experience. No matter where you are in the world, as long as we can communicate online, I can do something constructive and valuable.

If you need my CV, I will gladly provide it upon request.

I would not do this here if the other postings had been successful, and time is running short.

 

Health Care Top US Employer and What It Means for Medical Travel

Back to the real world of health care, et. al.

Last week, The Atlantic magazine reported that the US health care industry has supplanted manufacturing and retail to become the largest source of jobs in the US.

The article, by Derek Thompson, reports that for the first time in history, in the last quarter, there are now more jobs in health care than in the two industries that were the leading job engines of the 20th century.

According to Thompson, in 2000, there were 7 million more workers in manufacturing than in health care, and at the beginning of the Great Recession, there were 2.4 million more workers in retail than in health care.

Thompson says that there are three main drivers of the boom in health care jobs.

  • First, Americans as a group are getting older. By 2025, one-quarter of the workforce will be older than 55 (your humble blogger). This will have doubled in just 30 years. It will have a profound economic and political impact, such as declining productivity and electoral showdowns between a young, diverse workforce and an older, whiter retirement bloc. [True in the last election.] The most obvious effect of an aging population will be that it needs more care, and more workers to care for them.
  • Second, health care is publicly subsidized. The US spends hundreds of billions of dollars on Medicare, Medicaid, and benefits for government employees and veterans. [The recent tax bill passed will make substantial cuts to many of these programs, or outright privatize them.] The US also subsidizes private insurance through tax breaks for employers who sponsor health care.
  • Third, two of the most destabilizing forces for labor in the last generation have been globalization and automation. They have hurt manufacturing and retail by offshoring factories, replacing human arms with robotic limbs, and dooming fusty department stores. Health care is resistant to both. While globalization has revolutionized supply chains and created a global market for manufacturing labor, most health care is local. A Connecticut dentist isn’t selling her services to Portugal, and a physician’s receptionist in Lisbon isn’t directing her patient to Stamford. [I take exception here, as many of you will too. It seems Mr. Thompson has not heard of Medical Travel, both inbound and outbound, and therein lies your problem.]

Finally, the growth in health care employment is more located in administrative jobs than in physician jobs. The number of non-physicians has exploded in the last two decades. Most of these jobs are administrative such as receptionists and office clerks. It is not clear that these workers improve outcomes for patients.

Robert Kocher, a senior fellow at the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics at USC said the following, “Despite all this additional labor, the most meaningful difference in quality over the past 10 years is the recent reduction in 30-day hospital readmissions from an average of 19 percent to 17.8 percent.”

One other point Thompson notes, is that categories like retail and health care are imperfect approximations, and that some categories are too restrictive, and some are too broad. He points out that there are more jobs in leisure and hospitality than in health care. [Which would explain why some in Medical Travel are more like travel agents, than medical professionals.]

So, while there is good news about the position of health care employment in the US, the downside is, at least as far as Medical Travel is concerned, that globalization may not have as much of an impact on health care as I, and others have thought, and that portends bad news for the industry.