Category Archives: Dental Clinics

Cross-Border Dental Care in Mexico

On Sunday, NBC Nightly News ran a video report on dental care in Los Algodones, Mexico, south of the border from Arizona, and west of Yuma.

According to the report, during the winter months, up to 7,000 Americans travel to Los Algodones for dental care.

Los Algodones, also known as “Molar City”, is the self-proclaimed dental capital of the world. While that sounds like hype, I can tell you from personal experience that it is not the only town on the border where one can find dozens of dental offices.

When I presented at the 5th Mexico Medical Tourism and Wellness Business Summit in 2014, I visited a town east of Reynosa called Nuevo Progresso where I saw some of the dental offices, along with some of the other attendees.

Here is the video from NBC.

http://www.nbcnews.com/widget/video-embed/1018704963518

And here are some pictures from Nuevo Progresso.

I took these pictures in a small medical center on the main street of Nuevo Progresso, just over the border from Texas. To the left of the picture on the left, is the bridge crossing the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo) into the US.

And the people I saw on the street were not Mexicans, they were Americans.

Still think medical travel is a stupid and ridiculous idea? Try telling it to the thousands who go across the border.

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Global Medical Tourism Industry Market Analysis

Note: The following is a re-print from U.S. Domestic Medical Travel.com, one of two publications from CPR Strategic Marketing Communications. They also publish Medical Travel Today.com, and both publications have re-printed several of my posts on both of their newsletters, so I am returning the favor, which they have paid me many times over. I do not vouch for the accuracy of the data in the article, so please address any comments to the author.

Here is the article:

Global Medical Tourism Market By Treatment Type and by Region – Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth Trends and Forecasts (2016 – 2021)

The global medical tourism market has been estimated to be valued at USD 14,278 million, and it is anticipated to reach a market value of USD 21,380 million by the end of 2021 at a projected CAGR of 8.41% during the forecast period, 2016 to 2021.

Medical tourism involves travelling to another country for obtaining medical treatment. It is a high-growth industry driven by globalization and rising healthcare costs in the developed countries. A study shows that in United States, about 750,000 residents travel abroad for healthcare each year. A range of governments across the globe has taken up various initiatives to stimulate and improve the medical tourism in the respective countries in order to improve patient care and help expand the market. Many countries could see potential for significant economic development in the emergent field of medical tourism. Cosmetic surgery, dental care, elective surgery, fertility treatments, cardiovascular surgery and genetic disorder treatments are the most preferred healthcare treatments in this sector.

High cost of medical treatment in the developed countries and availability of those treatments at a lower cost in other countries have fueled the development of medical tourism. In addition, the availability of latest medical technologies and a growing compliance on international quality standards drive this market. The use of English as the main working language solves the problem of communication and patient satisfaction, adding to the growth of this market. Enhanced patient care, health insurance portability, advertising and marketing help the medical tourism industry to grow at a fast rate. On the other hand, infection outbreaks during or after travel, issues in following up with the patients before returning to their own country, and medical record transfer issues are the factors restraining the growth of the tourism industry. However, the unavailability of certain treatments at a lower cost hampers this market more than any other factors.

The global market for the medical tourism industry is segmented based on treatment type (cosmetic treatment, dental treatment, cardiovascular treatment, orthopedics treatment, bariatric surgery, fertility treatment, eye surgery and general treatment) and geographical regions. Cosmetic treatments hold the largest market share, as cosmetic surgeries are not covered by insurance.

Based on geography, the market is segmented into North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. APAC holds the largest market share, followed by Europe. Thailand and Malaysia are strong markets with prospect for significant growth, followed by Korea.

The key players in the global medical tourism market are Bangkok Hospital Medical Center, Asian Heart Institute, Apollo Hospitals Enterprise Ltd., Bumrungrad International Hospital, Fortis Healthcare Ltd., Min-Sheng General Hospital, Raffles Medical Group, Prince Court Medical Center, KPJ Healthcare Berhad, and Samitivej Sukhumvit.

For more information please click on:
http://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/mkptu7l/4109970

Veni, vidi, reliqui…or I came, I saw, I left

Julius Caesar once said, “Veni, vidi, vici”, which means, “I came, I saw, I conquered.” While my week in Mexico was not as world-shaking as Big Julie’s, it was eye-opening and informative.

First, let me state that our host did a wonderful job in preparing the conference center, the town of Reynosa, and the surrounding area for the 5th Medical Tourism and Wellness Business Summit in Mexico. We were greeted warmly, and they were very friendly to us, and gave us some lovely gifts, both in the hotel and in the hospital some of us visited on the last day of the conference.

We also visited some dental clinics in Nuevo Progreso, a town on the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo border, a half an hour or so east of Reynosa. Two of the dentists received their training in the US; one at Baylor, the other at Loma Linda in CA.

The fact that some of us did not speak Spanish was a drawback, but there was an interpreter who did his level best to translate the speakers into English from Spanish, and into Spanish from English.

I met many people from the US, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, and Colombia. Some were medical tourism facilitators, i.e., brokers, other were doctors, dentists, and business people. Some of them I already knew online and met for the first time, and two I did not know were attending.

The entertainment Wednesday and Thursday afternoon was very good, with one Tejano band made entirely of teenage and younger boys. Also, tried my first taste of tequilla. And my last.

I now have a clearer picture of the quality of medical care in northeastern Mexico, and if I am fortunate enough to be invited back again next year, will try to attend the next summit in Puerta Vallarta.

From the little I could get in translation, the Mexican government, the various medical tourism clusters, and the business community in Mexico all agreed that they need a national medical tourism strategy, and it is hoped that this Summit is a step in the right direction.