Category Archives: Adverse Events

“Extreme Makeover” Surgery Leads to Death

A story from the Australian network, ABC, tells of an Australian man who went to Malaysia for cosmetic surgery, and came back with holes in his body and died.

I am posting the link here:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-12-18/medical-tourism-mother-warns-of-risk-coroner-delivers-findings/9260626

We all know there are risks to any surgery, but in the case of medical travel, one or two bad outcomes can be serious to not only the brand of the facilitator, but to the entire industry,.

Rather than conducting conferences around the world where you pat each other on the back, why don’t you call one big meeting to set out some global standards of treatment and declare that you will drive those causing harm, both facilitators and providers, out of the industry.

Stand up and make this industry safe. And stop patting each other on the back with useless certificates and awards that have no meaning to real people.

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Time For Medical Tourism Industry to Clean Up Its Act

An article in Arizona Central (see link below) highlights the problem with weight-loss surgery in Mexico.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/money/business/health/2017/11/16/mexico-gastric-sleeve-weight-loss-surgery-deaths-arizona-medical-tourism-risks/576309001/

This isn’t the first article on this subject, and won’t be the last, but the industry must clean up its act, stop patting yourselves on the back at all these fancy conferences around the world, come together to lay down guidelines and industry-driven protocols and standards of care and legal protections, and lastly, get rid of the crooks (you know who they and you are), charlatans, con men, and carnival barkers who promote medical travel, and give it a black eye.

Naturally, there are risks to any surgery, no matter where it occurs, but if medical travel is to be marketed as less costly, with better outcomes, the quacks and thieves must be removed from the industry.

Stop dissing each other, start cooperating with each other, and cut back on the conferences. Nobody of any real importance to the growth of the industry attends; only those who talk a great deal or are promoting their own businesses.

Here is a video that goes along with the article.

https://uw-media.azcentral.com/video/embed/106607688?placement=embed

 

 

Ten Facts About Medical Travel

Maria Maldonado has put together a list of ten facts about medical travel that people in the workers’ comp world should know about.

While it is true that there have been serious medical issues abroad, the same medical errors can and do occur right here at home. One particular one that stuck in my mind some years ago was a patient at a hospital in Tampa who had the wrong body part removed.

Also, there may be some who question whether the JCI’s accreditation is sufficient enough to justify patients going abroad, but absent any other reputable institutions, the JCI will have to suffice as a starting point or floor to which any such future institutions will have to better.

Here is the link to Maria’s post:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/10-things-you-should-know-medical-tourism-maria-maldonado?trk=hb_ntf_MEGAPHONE_ARTICLE_POST

Sluggish Hospital Improvement

Modern Healthcare published the following article that stated that there was sluggish improvement in patient safety in the nation’s hospitals.

Here is the link to the article:

http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20151028/HOLD/151029895/leapfrog-hospital-improvement-sluggish-despite-some-stars?utm_campaign=socialflow&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social

Still believe we have the best hospitals in the world, or just the most expensive?

It’s your choice, poor quality and high cost, or low cost and better quality somewhere else.

Or maybe the injured workers should make that choice.

Ensuring Patient Safety: Making Sure Medical Tourism Puts Its Money Where Its Mouth Is

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The medical tourism industry prides itself on the better quality of care found in hospitals in medical tourism destinations, but questions about just how good American hospitals are remain.

Insurance Thought Leadership.com published an article today called “The Most Dangerous Place In The World”, written by Leah Binder, President & CEO of The Leapfrog Group (Leapfrog), a national organization based in Washington, DC, representing employer purchasers of health care and calling for improvements in the safety and quality of the nation’s hospitals.

Her article describes the hospital stay of the father of a Harvard professor Ms. Binder knows in an American hospital that was anything but routine.

Here are some of the key takeaways from the article, and should give the medical tourism industry some solace, and some reason to make sure that their hospitals are better than those in the US:

    • American hospitals are “the most dangerous place in the world.”
    • The safety problem is an open secret among people in the health care industry. The statistics are staggering. Each year, one in four people admitted to a hospital suffer some form of harm, and more than 500 patients per day die.
    • We must have a better approach for tracking harm in the hospital, hospitals need to feel the financial consequences of providing unsafe care, and accountability for patient safety must be created.
    • Last year, The Leapfrog Group initiated an effort to rate the safety of 2,600 hospitals. The Hospital Safety Score is available to the public for free on a website and as an app.
    • A recent AARP Magazine article notes features used in safer hospitals that all of us should look for in our own hospital.

If the medical tourism industry is to remain viable and grow larger around the world, it is imperative that hospital administrators, patient advocates, providers, medical tourism facilitators, ministries of Health and other relevant government entities insist on not only reaching quality measures in the US, but beating them, and beating them by an overwhelming margin that makes medical tourism a sound alternative, not only for individual  or group health insurance patients, but for patients injured on the job and covered under workers’ compensation.