Author Archives: Transforming Workers' Comp

About Transforming Workers' Comp

Have worked in the Insurance and Risk Management industry for more than thirty years in New York, Florida and Texas in the Claims and Risk Management spheres, primarily in Workers’ Compensation Claims, Auto No-Fault and Property & Casualty Claims Administration and Claims Management. Have experience in Risk and Insurance Business Analysis, Risk Management Information Systems, and Insurance Data Processing and Data Management. Received my Master’s in Health Administration (MHA) degree from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida in December 2011. Received my Master of Arts (MA) degree in American History from New York University, and received my Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in Liberal Arts (Political Science/History/Social Sciences) from SUNY Brockport. I have studied World History, Global Politics, and have a strong interest in the future of human civilization in all aspects; economic, political and social. I am looking for new opportunities that will utilize my previous experience and MHA degree. I am available for speaking engagements and am willing to travel. LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardkrasner Resume: https://www.box.com/s/z8rxcks6ix41m3ocvvep

Cross-Border Health Care – Insurance Industry Finally Takes Notice

Readers of this blog have no doubt read my first post on cross-border health care, Cross-Border Health Care a Reality in California, among others. Many of them dealt with getting medical care under workers’ compensation, and the others were confined to the health care space.

Thanks to fellow blogger, Joe Paduda, who sent me a copy of the following Quick Take from the GB Journal, a publication of Gallagher Bassett, the issue of cross-border health care, especially in workers’ comp (my idea originally) is finally getting traction in the industry.

Not that I am blowing my horn, mind you, but it would have been nice to get some recognition a few years back when I started writing.

Well, anyway, here is the item from GB Journal:

Quick Take 2:
Cross Border Health Care

Employers in Arizona and California’s huge agriculture business figured this out a long time ago. For many employees who are either Mexican nationals or who have extensive family connections in northern Mexico, getting needed medical treatment in Mexico can be both more convenient and much more cost effective than treatment north of the border. Your humble correspondent set up group health PPO networks in Mexicali and Tijuana for seasonal farm workers back in the 80s. They worked remarkably well and provided this generally underserved group with excellent care at affordable rates. A recent article in Risk & Insurance’s online service describes how the same concept is now being used for treatment under workers’ compensation. 

Yes, this is legal under California law. (The R&I article does not mention Arizona comp law.) The author makes specific reference to the Mexican HMO Sistemas Medicos Nacionales, S.A. de C.V. (SIMNSA), which is – an important point – licensed by the State of California. In addition to lower costs and convenience, treating in Mexico can have additional advantages for injured workers who are not fluent in English and who feel more comfortable in a familiar cultural setting. Getting medical treatment in Mexico is not suitable for all claims or all employees, obviously, but if you have a significant comp exposure close to our southern border, you might want to check this out with your comp carrier or TPA, if you have not already.

If you want any additional information, or would like to explore this option for your workers’ comp needs, contact me and I will work with you to put together a plan for you.

The Free Market Utopian Fantasy

Whenever the subject of what to do about the cost of health care arises on the social media site, LinkedIn, invariably there is someone who attempts to deflect the discussion away from the logical solution of Medicare for All/Single Payer, to what I am calling the Free Market Utopian Fantasy.

Those of you who read my post, “Health Care Is Not a Market”, will understand that when it comes to health care, the rules of the market do not apply. That is why I have called the attitude and comments made by these individuals, the Free Market Utopian Fantasy. Because the free market in health care is a fantasy. It is usually the expression of economic libertarianism coming from the right-wing propaganda machine.

Simply put, the Free Market Utopian Fantasy states that if we only had a truly free market health care system, costs would regulate themselves through competition, as in other areas of the free market.

In fact, one observer recently said the following in a thread on LI: “This would not be the case IF there were created and implemented an ORDERLY market for health care services based upon free market enterprise principles whereby ALL costs are transparent to ALL parties.”

An orderly market? Are you serious? More of the same BS from the Free Market Utopians.

Then there is the idea that consumers, read that as patients, must educate themselves as to the best choice. Choice? When you are dying of a heart attack? Choice, when you only have a short time to live due to a serious illness like Cancer or Diabetes?

Folks, we are not talking about choosing between buying steak or chicken. This is not choosing to go to Italy next summer or to the Caribbean. We are talking about life and death. And the only choice is to do what will save your life, not choose between colors on a swatch.

This Free Market Utopian Fantasy has infected so many people in the health care industry, and they are trying to prevent the American people from receiving the same quality of care at lower cost than all the other Western and other nations already do for their people.

They claim that we can’t afford to do it. I ask, can we afford not to?

They cite statistics about Medicare like some cite similar statistics about Social Security, but they are wrong then, and they are wrong about Medicare for All, because it will be expanded to cover everyone and everything, not requiring separate insurance for things like vision and dental care, mental health, and long-term care.

Here is what one person said in the same thread cited above:

“We can barely afford Medicare for the 60 million current Medicare recipients. Adding another 270 million recipients would bankrupt the nation in short order. Latest data (2017) on Medicare shows an annual cost of $700 billion, and projections show the Medicare Trust Fund will be insolvent in 2026 – and by the way, Medicare actually only covers about half of the real cost because the rest is covered by supplementary insurances that have to be bought by the patient. If you assume that Medicare expansion was at the same cost rate as current Medicare, Medicare for all would cost at least $3.15 trillion in 2017 dollars. Total 2019 federal government revenue is estimated at $6.5 trillion, and estimated Medicare for all costs for 2019 would be $3.5 trillion. It is simply not feasible.”

Boy, they really know how to BS their way to keeping us the only Western nation that does not have universal health care. What they don’t realize is, there won’t be any private insurance, because it is private insurance that drives up the cost of health care with administrative costs and waste,

Well, it is high time we call BS on all of them, and their Free Market Utopian Fantasy. Until we stop listening to these folks who are protecting their careers and profits, no American will never have to worry if they or a loved one gets sick and cannot afford the needed medical care without going bankrupt or dying without ever receiving the care they so desperately need. I said as much in my other post, “By What Right”, where I took these folks to task for preventing the enactment of MFA/Single Payer.

These Free Market Utopians are not doing anyone any favors. They are only hurting millions of Americans, born or not-yet-born who will someday need a truly comprehensive, universal health care system, and it won’t be there thanks to them and their associates.

Florida lawmakers pass bill for Canadian drug importation – Sun Sentinel

From the Overnight News Desk:

Richard’s Note: My late mother worked for a local company that imported drugs for seniors from Canada, the UK, and Israel. The seniors would bring the prescription from the doctor to their office, the employees would fax the prescription and any other documents to the pharmacies in those countries, who would then ship the medications directly to the seniors, without the drugs ever going to the company’s office.

As the two articles cited below state, this would be a departure from Republican orthodoxy on prescription drugs, and could be a model for other states to pursue to bring down the cost of drugs, at least as far as senior citizens are concerned.

I post these articles to honor my mother for her work to help fellow seniors to get less expensive versions of their medications.

Here are the two articles:

Floridians could eventually gain access to cheaper Canadian prescription drugs under legislation the state House has sent to Gov. Ron DeSantis.

Source: Florida lawmakers pass bill for Canadian drug importation – Sun Sentinel

Source: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis defies GOP orthodoxy with drug importation plan

Food for Thought

All those who are opposed to Medicare for All/Single Payer, here is a meme that should open your minds to the fact that the US is wrong to deny its citizens what other nations already provides. Any excuse offered is just a cop-out, and not a very good one.

 

Opinion | Universal Health Care Might Cost You Less Than You Think – The New York Times

Today’s New York Times Opinion piece on universal health care is a timely one, given the attempts by the medical-industrial complex and their allies to derail any move towards health care for all. It is even more important now that the 2020 Democratic primary campaign is gaining momentum.

UnitedHealth Group’s Hemsley sees $65.6 million in pay | Star Tribune

OBSCENE!

Readers will recall the two articles I posted recently about UnitedHealth’s attempt to scuttle Medicare for All, and how it nearly backfired on them, but took down payers and providers instead.

Well, this article today from the Minneapolis Star-Tribune should make even those not yet on board with MFA cringe. Now you know why they say MFA is not good. It would affect the Executive Chairman, and I suppose, the other executives’ obscene pay.

Sure, $65 million for him; lousy health care that is expensive, complex, dysfunctional for you just so that he can reap the benefits.

Anyway, here’s the article:

The executive chairman of Minnesota’s largest company saw most of the pay in the form of stock-based compensation from previous years.

Source: UnitedHealth Group’s Hemsley sees $65.6 million in pay | Star Tribune

UnitedHealth CEO’s ‘Medicare for All’ bashing sends payer, provider shares tumbling | Healthcare Dive

On the heels of Monday’s post, Whistleblower Reveals Effort of Employer to Crush Medicare for All, comes the following from Healthcare Dive.

It seems that bashing Medicare for All has an economic impact after all; just not on the company doing the bashing.

Aren’t we sick (get it) and tired of Wall Street and their corporate CEO allies determining our health care system, which is just a mechanism for them to profit from other’s misfortunes or luck at not getting sick?

When will we stop letting these vultures pick away at the carcass of the American health care system for the benefit of their stakeholders, investors, and the medical-industrial complex?

The other day, on Fox News, Bernie Sanders attended a town hall in which the host asked the audience if they were willing to switch from an employer-based health care system to one provided by the government, as Senator Sanders and others have advocated. The host was shocked to learn that the answer was yes from the audience.

So let me get this straight. A Fox News audience wants Medicare for All, but a corporate CEO in the medical-industrial complex can veto their wishes. Is this a democracy or a plutocracy?

You decide, after all, that is Fox’s tagline. Here’s the Healthcare Dive article:

The biggest private payer beat Wall Street expectations on Tuesday, but a rebuke of plans to expand Medicare weighed on health companies.

Source: UnitedHealth CEO’s ‘Medicare for All’ bashing sends payer, provider shares tumbling | Healthcare Dive