Don’t Shoot Me, I’m Only The Messenger

From the “I Think It’s Time for Another Rant” Department

In response to my last post, The Further Adventures of Ashley Furniture in Medical Travel, I received several comments about the facts presented in the article, which by the way was also published in The New York Times, A Mexican Hospital, an American Surgeon, and a $5,000 Check (Yes, a Check).

Now I don’t mind comments, I welcome them. But they should not be directed towards me personally, because I am not responsible for any misleading or inaccurate reporting by the author or authors of articles I write about.

Some of the comments should, rightly be directed to the individuals or organizations mentioned in the article, as they are the active participants in what the article was describing, namely the knee replacement surgery of the spouse of an employee of Ashley Furniture Company.

I would like to point out one fact I failed to mention. Ashley has sent about 150 employees or dependents to either Mexico or Costa Rica, and since 2016, they have saved $3.2 million in health care costs, according to Marcus Gagnon, the company’s manager of global benefits and health.

Mr. Gagnon, as a side note, was featured in two previous articles published by Medical Travel Today.Com back in October and November 2017. (See my posts: Ashley Furniture and Medical Travel, part 1 and Ashley Furniture and Medical Travel, part 2)

Points were raised as to why NASH is sending patients and exporting surgeons to other countries to perform cheaper surgery pricing? NASH stands for North American Specialty Hospital. To answer that question, go to the source, NASH.

Another point was raised about pricing, and it was mentioned that US facilities charge as low as $14,990 for a total knee replacement, implant included, as a transparent bundled case rate. Hotel room for that is $149 plus tax, no hospital overnight required. And that malpractice insurance has no additional cost, plus there is no need for expensive flights, passports, etc.

Good question, Then why does the medical travel industry exist at all in the US, if what was commented is true? The fact is, it isn’t. That’s why Ashley, and HSM, a furniture manufacturer in North Carolina has been doing this for some time, as I have previously reported, and because I met the patient advocate for one of HSM’s employees at the ProMed event in 2014.

The patient in the KHN article, Donna Ferguson, also works for a furniture manufacturer in her Mississippi home town, and I bet that her employer was sure glad it wasn’t his dime that paid for her surgery, but that her husband’s company did.

Another point was made about the “concerns about quality of care” and the way Mexico does not require continuing education credits, and other criticisms of the Mexican health care system. Yet, as the article stated, they went beyond the JCI standards, and even got an extra autoclave to sterilize instruments more quickly.

Also, a comment was made about where the surgeon was from. In this instance, he was a Mayo Clinic trained, orthopedic surgeon from Milwaukee, and he would not have done this if he felt it would ruin his standing in the profession. Oh, and maybe there have been other physicians who have traveled to meet patients elsewhere. So what. The article was talking about this one, not a whole list of them.

Yes, I have not visited Galenia or Bumrungrad, as many of you have. That has been the point of my writing a blog for nearly seven years. But I have only been to three events, and only one invited me to speak. What am I, chopped liver? I post my articles to my blog and LinkedIn so that folks can read them and invite me.

Of course, I’d like to take fam tours of facilities. Of course, I’d like to meet other people in the industry, but since October 2012 when I began, I have struggled financially, personally, and medically to just stay alive. A little concern and interest on your part would have been nice.

The other points raised in the comments about the $5000 dollars she received and fees and patents, waiving deductibles and copayments were more than likely handled by Ashley’s medical travel plan administrator, IndusHealth, who also happened to be the administrator for HSM, and whose president I also met at ProMed in 2014. Again, I am only a messenger.

Finally, a comment was made that my next to last paragraph was a stretch. Perhaps so, but in light of this past weekend’s protests in Portland between anti-fascists and fascists, and the shootings in Dayton and El Paso, not to mention, three that were foiled last week, and Trump’s Nuremburg-style rallies, I can be forgiven if I want to express an idea that could bring some people to understand what the rest of the world is like.

I am not interested in what other protests happen around the world. I am only concerned, as far as Americans and medical travel are concerned, with showing them that there are no “shithole” countries, and that there are good and bad everywhere. I believe a little on-the-ground education, especially among the working class, white or otherwise, will improve racial and ethnic relations. Call me an idealist, but that is all we have to go on if we are ever going to have peace in the world.

There was something mentioned in the article that is kind of puzzling. A medical travel expert was quoted as saying that “Building a familiar culture in a foreign destination may be appealing to some American consumers, but I do not see it as a sustainable business.” If that is so, then why is he in the business in the first place, and why is he partnered with someone else on a podcast on that very subject, and who are both known in the medical travel world?

That’s the end of my rant. I invite anyone who wants to invite me to the next event or fam tour, to do so. Please let me know in advance what you are willing to pay for, and give me enough time to make arrangements for traveling with my medical condition, as traveling outside the US is somewhat problematic, depending on where it is, and other factors that might prevent me from doing so.

And again, Don’t Shoot Me, I’m Only the Messenger.

 

This entry was posted in Knee Replacement, Medical Tourism, Medical Travel, Mexico and tagged , , , , , , , , on by .

About Transforming Workers' Comp

Have worked in the Insurance and Risk Management industry for more than thirty years in New York, Florida and Texas in the Claims and Risk Management spheres, primarily in Workers’ Compensation Claims, Auto No-Fault and Property & Casualty Claims Administration and Claims Management. Have experience in Risk and Insurance Business Analysis, Risk Management Information Systems, and Insurance Data Processing and Data Management. Received my Master’s in Health Administration (MHA) degree from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida in December 2011. Received my Master of Arts (MA) degree in American History from New York University, and received my Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in Liberal Arts (Political Science/History/Social Sciences) from SUNY Brockport. I have studied World History, Global Politics, and have a strong interest in the future of human civilization in all aspects; economic, political and social. I am looking for new opportunities that will utilize my previous experience and MHA degree. I am available for speaking engagements and am willing to travel. LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardkrasner Resume: https://www.box.com/s/z8rxcks6ix41m3ocvvep

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