Monthly Archives: February 2019

Could Medicare for All Solve the healthcare cost problem? – Managed Care Matters

Following on the heels of yesterday’s post from Joe, today’s post covers the cost of healthcare, and what Medicare for All could do to solve it.

Recently, two billionaires, Former NY Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former barista-in-chief Howard Schultz have both said that the US cannot afford Medicare for All/Single Payer health care.

But if we look at Joe’s article, and his subsequent ones later this week, can we afford not to?

You decide.

Here’s Joe’s article:

This week we are unpacking Single Payer/Medicare for All to better understand the many variations of SP/MFA and now they are different, how those variations might work, and whether some version is a) politically viable and b) would solve the … Continue reading Could Medicare for All Solve the healthcare cost problem?

Source: Could Medicare for All Solve the healthcare cost problem? – Managed Care Matters

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What’s all this about Single Payer and Medicare For All? – Managed Care Matters

Once again, my fellow blogger, Joe Paduda hits it out of the ballpark in explaining Single Payer and Medicare For All.

Most of what you hear comes from politicians and a few billionaires, one running for President and one not; one a former barista, the other a former big city mayor.

But there is also a lot of misinformation and wrong information on the Internet, especially on social media sites like LinkedIn, where the professionals in the health care or insurance space spout off their opposition to Single Payer/Medicare For All mostly because it will disrupt their businesses and may even cost them their jobs. But never mind that millions of Americans can’t afford insurance, or have very little insurance to protect them in case of severe illness or disease.

These individuals are not physicians, nor are they executives with insurance companies, or hospitals; but rather, they are consultants and analysts who offer their services to the health care industry.

But not all commenters are in the health care field, many are just average business people or citizens who put their two cents into the discussion threads, without knowing what they are talking about, or without any facts to back up their argument.

One common refrain is that Single Payer/Medicare For All is government-controlled health care. It isn’t, it’s government financed health care, but to their minds, any time the government pays for something, they “control” it.

So, Joe’s article today is sorely need to clear up any misconceptions.

Here it is:

It’s the worst kind of government over-reach. It’s an easy solution to a huge problem that will cost nothing. And everything in between. Between now and Election Day you are going to hear a lot about Medicare for All and … Continue reading What’s all this about Single Payer and Medicare For All?

Source: What’s all this about Single Payer and Medicare For All? – Managed Care Matters

Medical Travel/Health Care Thought Leader Seeks Employment Opportunities

Medical Travel/HealthCare Thought Leader and Blogger, seeks part-time, remote employment opportunities. I am willing to speak, write, and collaborate on projects to bring about greater participation of patients to global medical travel facilities.

I am not a physician, nor do I have clients to refer to you. I offer my services in an administrative or managerial capacity.

Experience:

Over six years’ experience creating, maintaining, and analyzing current issues in Medical Travel, Health Care, and other topics.

Over six years research into the Medical Travel industry.

Promoted the implementation of medical travel into Workers’ Compensation insurance industry.

Analyzed the cost of healthcare and the options of alternative treatments abroad.

Presented White Paper to Medical Travel conference in Mexico in Nov. 2014.

Extensive experience in Insurance and Claims Management, especially in medical-related claims (Workers’ Compensation).

Strong administrative and financial skills.

Education:

Master’s in Health Administration, 2011

Interested in working remotely, willing to travel, willing to write and speak at conferences, has valid US passport.

Resume can be found here.

Blog: richardkrasner.wordpress.com

Phone number: +1 561-603-1685 (mobile)

Benefits Industry Leaders Warned About Medicare for All

It is amazing, but not surprising that we are seeing more and more business leaders coming out to prevent Americans from getting single payer health care under an improved and expanded Medicare for All.

The following article from BenefitsPro.com is aimed at warning the benefits industry not to underestimate single payer, and advises them on how to deal with this.

Naturally, it is all about selling a product to make a profit from not covering all Americans, and only those who get their health insurance from their employers, since that is what the article discusses.

They don’t care about the millions who are uninsured, under-insured, or who can’t afford insurance, let alone the cost of prescription drugs and medically necessary treatments. What matters to them is how many benefit packages they can sell to employers.

One thing to note from the article, Nelson Griswold said the following at the NextGen Growth & Leadership Summit:

“Once a country has moved to government-controlled health care, it has never gone back. My prediction is that we’ll have single payer in five years.”

I hope he’s right, as far as his prediction is concerned. However, he is also right about one other thing, No country has or will give up their current system for the one we have here in the US. They would be crazy to do so, and we are crazy for not doing what they have been doing for many years, and they are doing ok with theirs.

Change is hard, but once change happens, people generally feel that the change was worth it, and that all the worrying and apprehension over that change was misplaced, misguided, and silly.

So it will be with Medicare for All. They said the same thing about Medicare, and they recruited a has-been actor who would later turn politician to scare the living daylights out of seniors with the phrase, “socialized medicine.” Now, many Americans like Medicare. And the term, “socialized medicine” has another meaning. It means that capitalist medicine is better than socialized medicine, but that too has been proven wrong.

Anyway, here’s the link to this warning shot across the bow of single payer from an unexpected sector of the medical-industrial complex and consulting industry.

https://www.benefitspro.com/2019/02/08/why-single-payer-may-be-closer-than-you-think-and-what-to-do-about-it/?kw=Why%20single-payer%20may%20be%20closer%20than%20you%20think%20%28and%20what%20to%20do%20about%20it%29&slreturn=20190113103133

 

Dental tourism has some travelling abroad to save money

Another tweet from Josef Woodman about dental tourism in Costa Rica.

Getting a million dollar smile can cost thousands of dollars, money that a lot of people are not willing to spend. That’s why more and more Southwest Floridians are traveling abroad for a dental vacation.

Source: Dental tourism has some travelling abroad to save money

Lower Prescription Drug Prices Lure Americans To Mexico To Buy Meds : Shots – Health News : NPR

Good morning all.

Thanks go out to Josef Woodman who tweeted the following today from NPR about prescription drugs and going across the Mexican border to buy them at lower cost.

This is in addition to the article I recently posted, Run for the Border (Not a Taco Bell Commercial).

So wall, or no wall, Americans are going to look for cheaper prescription drugs, either in Mexico or Canada, or elsewhere, until we allow the government to negotiate prices for medications under an improved and expanded Medicare for All.

But thanks to a former Louisiana congressman who left Congress to become the President and CEO of PhRMA, a pharmaceutical company lobbying group, Congress passed a bill that prevents Medicare from negotiating lower drug prices and bans the importation of identical, cheaper, drugs from Canada and elsewhere.

But it does not have to be this way. We can lower drug prices, but by allowing the government to negotiate them, and not giving the pharmaceutical industry huge giveaways.

Here is NPR’s article:

Faced with high U.S. prices for prescription drugs, some Americans cross the border to buy insulin pens and other meds. At least 1 insurer reimburses flights to the border to make such purchases easy.

Source: Lower Prescription Drug Prices Lure Americans To Mexico To Buy Meds : Shots – Health News : NPR

Hospital prices, not physicians, drive cost growth, Health Affairs says | Healthcare Dive

Here’s another article about prices from last Tuesday that should be read in conjunction with today’s article on prices.

If we keep doing the same things over and over again to make things better, and they don’t work, that is a sure sign we are crazy, so ideas like antitrust enforcement, while a good idea in general business, and the incentivizing of more cost-efficient physician referrals, only scratches the surface.

The real problem is how health care in the US is just another revenue stream for investors and stockholders of insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies, and hospitals and hospital systems, as I reported also today in Hospital Mergers Improve Health? Evidence Shows the Opposite – The New York Times

So here is last Tuesday’s article:

The report suggests measures aimed at cutting healthcare costs focus on issues like antitrust enforcement and incentivizing more cost-efficient physician referrals.

Source: Hospital prices, not physicians, drive cost growth, Health Affairs says | Healthcare Dive