Monthly Archives: January 2019

Medical Travel/Health Care Thought Leader Seeks Opportunities

 

Medical Travel/HealthCare Thought Leader and Blogger, seeks opportunities to speak, write, and collaborate on projects to bring about greater participation of patients to global medical travel facilities.

NOTE: DUE TO SEVERE FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL DISTRESS, I AM SEEKING IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITIES IN MEDICAL TRAVEL. PLEASE RESPOND IF YOU CAN OFFER ASSISTANCE, AS THIS IS A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH.

BE ADVISED : I am not a physician, nor do I have patients or clients to refer to you. I am seeking persons already engaged in medical travel who want to expand into a new market. I offer my services in an administrative or managerial capacity.

Experience:

Over six years experience creating, maintaining, and analyzing current issues in Medical Travel, Health Care, and other topics.

Over six years research into the Medical Travel industry.

Promoted the implementation of medical travel into Workers’ Compensation insurance industry.

Analyzed the cost of healthcare and the options of alternative treatments abroad.

Presented White Paper to Medical Travel conference in Mexico in Nov. 2014.

Extensive experience in Insurance and Claims Management, especially in medical-related claims (Workers’ Compensation).

Strong administrative and financial skills.

Education:

Master’s in Health Administration, 2011

Interested in working remotely, willing to travel, willing to write and speak at conferences, has valid US passport.

Resume can be found here.

Blog: richardkrasner.wordpress.com

Phone number: +1 561-603-1685 (mobile)

 

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Opt-Out: The Final Word?

For the first post of the new year, I want to return to a well-worn subject, thanks to Joe Paduda, who published his predictions for workers’ comp last week: Opt-Out in workers’ comp.

In part 2 of Joe’s predictions, he predicted that Opt-Out will not gain any traction, and that Opt-Out is a solution in search of a problem. By that, Joe means that workers’ comp is working well overall, and that costs are under control, employers don’t see it as an issue, and there is no political constituency that wants to make it happen.

Joe rightly points out that the problems facing work comp are tiny compared to other issues state legislatures are dealing with — such as taxes, school funding, gerrymandering, Medicaid expansion, rural hospital funding, industrial and economic development, natural disaster preparation and recovery.

However, Joe’s friend, Jennifer Wolf Horesjh, Executive Director of the IAIABC (International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions) believes that advocates are working diligently to promote Opt-Out/Non-subscription.

In my comment to Joe, I said the following: “The Koch Brothers and the companies behind ARAWC are free-market, libertarians who don’t want government social insurance programs like work comp. You are probably correct that it won’t happen, but that won’t stop them from trying.”

Whether Joe is right or wrong in his prediction, will have to wait until the end of this year. But since it is only a prediction, time will tell if Opt-Out moves forward. Thus the title of this piece has a question mark, because we don’t know what the final word is on the subject.