Monthly Archives: January 2019

Beware Billionaires Against Medicare for All

This week, the former CEO of everyone’s favorite coffee house and time waster, Starbucks, declared that he was considering a run for president next year as an independent.

This announcement brought immediate response from both wings of the Democratic Party, as they said it would result in the re-election of the current occupant of the White House.

Even former NYC Mayor, Michael Bloomberg, another billionaire, said that he should not run.

However, as this is a blog about medical care, and not politics, I will leave the discussion as to the efficacy of an independent run for president by another billionaire for others.

What I do want to focus on is this overpaid former barista’s belief that the US cannot afford a Medicare for All, single-payer health care system.

Incidentally, this is also Bloomberg’s view as well.

But I do not think their opposition is based solely on the belief that Medicare for All, single-payer is too expensive. Rather, I believe they are afraid that after the results of last November’s midterm elections, the Democratic Party is poised to win back the White House and possibly the Senate, and that Medicare for All, in whatever form it takes, will be enacted.

I have written about the health care industry’s efforts to derail Medicare for All in previous posts. (See the following: https://wp.me/p2QJfz-QIyhttps://wp.me/p2QJfz-Jki, and https://wp.me/p2QJfz-WI5)

While I cannot accuse Schultz and Bloomberg of being in the pocket of the healthcare industry, it does look suspicious that now that the Democrats control the House, they are coming out against a health care plan that many Americans voted for when they voted for Democrats.

But billionaires should not be the ones deciding whether or not we enact Medicare for All. That should be up to the voters (patients and non-patients), their elected representatives, and most importantly, those in the medical profession who believe the time has come for Medicare for All, single-payer.

One such group are physicians themselves, as reported back in August in the magazine of the Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), which I was informed of this morning by a high school alumnus who posted the article on another alum’s Facebook post.

The article was originally posted in Jacobinmag.com.

Here is the link to the article by Meagan Day.

One caveat to progressives: Don’t assume that every American voter who is undecided, declared themselves as an independent, or are unhappy with their choice in the last presidential election, and his behavior and actions, will vote for your chosen candidate. That is why Schultz is contemplating running. And he can do a lot of damage to your plans for 2020.

 

 

Millions of Americans Flood Into Mexico for Health Care

I wrote about this town in Mexico back in July of 2017 when I posted an article titled, “Cross-border Dental Care in Mexico.”

As the Truthout.com article implies, this is a caravan that no one hears about, and would be closed down if the Orangutan, Rush Limbaugh, Ann Coulter, Fox News, and Pat Buchanan (he called for a wall on the Mexican border back in 1992 when he challenged the late President George H.W. Bush for the GOP nomination. See Kornacki’s book, The Red and the Blue, page 152) get their way.

Here is the Truthout.com’s article:

The US’s “dental refugees” flock to Mexico in the thousands every day, seeking affordable care.

Source: Millions of Americans Flood Into Mexico for Health Care

Who’s healthier and why. – Managed Care Matters

Yesterday, my fellow blogger, Joe Paduda, posted the following article about health care in the US and why whites are more healthier than people of color and native Americans.

It is a good quick read, and has some excellent graphics to go along with it. However, there are several factors missing in Joe’s analysis of the problem; yet, he is not wrong.

One of the factors missing is that in neighborhoods that have a large percentage of people of color, they are living in what has been termed, “food deserts”, whereby the choices they have in food are lacking because there are no good outlets for healthier choices. Supermarkets that would carry fresh fruit and vegetables, and other healthy options are replaced by local bodegas that carry sugary drinks and fattening snacks and other items.

Second, healthy choices often are more expensive than foods that are less healthy, and therefore, are not readily available to the residents of those areas. Whole Foods are nowhere to be found.

Third, there is a lack of education among people of color about what is healthy and unhealthy. And the food and beverage industry has used slick advertising campaigns to make fast food enticing.

But there have been some attempts to correct this problem. Former First Lady Michelle Obama, besides initiating her “Let’s Move” program, was very involved in getting school kids to grow their own food, and she even appeared on an episode of “Restaurant Impossible” with chef Robert Irvine and a local Virginia farmer to grow vegetables at a local school in the DC area. Upon moving into the White House, the current occupant even tore up her garden that was providing vegetables to the White House kitchen.

So, the issue of healthier food and minority communities is one that needs to be addressed constantly; otherwise, the food and beverage industry, as I learned when I wrote this paper for my MHA degree program, will continue to be in bed with the FDA and USDA, to the detriment of the health of people of color and native Americans.

Here is Joe’s article:

Two quick facts about healthcare in the US. One – we white people are a lot healthier than people of color and native Americans. This is particularly true for African Americans. Two, that’s because minorities have less access to healthcare. … Continue reading Who’s healthier and why.

Source: Who’s healthier and why. – Managed Care Matters

Low Wage Workers Pay More For Health Care Than High Wage Workers « Workers Comp Insider

Tom Lynch, of LynchRyan, posted this last week, but due to a technical error, it did not reach his audience. This article should be cited by anyone who encounters libertarian know-it-all’s on the Internet who put the blame of our expensive health care system on such individuals as lawyers, as one such person I recently debated. Also, the chart from the OECD should be cited over and over again when defending the subject of improved Medicare for All single payer health care. However, Tom does not support Medicare for All, which is understandable, but not a viable position given the overwhelming support it has among many Americans.

Here is Tom’s article:

Anyone who can rub two brain cells together knows America spends more, much more, on health care than any other developed nation, as this chart from the Organization for Economic and Cooperative De…

Source: Low Wage Workers Pay More For Health Care Than High Wage Workers « Workers Comp Insider

Medical Travel/Health Care Thought Leader Seeks Opportunities

 

Medical Travel/HealthCare Thought Leader and Blogger, seeks opportunities to speak, write, and collaborate on projects to bring about greater participation of patients to global medical travel facilities.

NOTE: DUE TO SEVERE FINANCIAL AND PERSONAL DISTRESS, I AM SEEKING IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITIES IN MEDICAL TRAVEL. PLEASE RESPOND IF YOU CAN OFFER ASSISTANCE, AS THIS IS A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH.

BE ADVISED : I am not a physician, nor do I have patients or clients to refer to you. I am seeking persons already engaged in medical travel who want to expand into a new market. I offer my services in an administrative or managerial capacity.

Experience:

Over six years experience creating, maintaining, and analyzing current issues in Medical Travel, Health Care, and other topics.

Over six years research into the Medical Travel industry.

Promoted the implementation of medical travel into Workers’ Compensation insurance industry.

Analyzed the cost of healthcare and the options of alternative treatments abroad.

Presented White Paper to Medical Travel conference in Mexico in Nov. 2014.

Extensive experience in Insurance and Claims Management, especially in medical-related claims (Workers’ Compensation).

Strong administrative and financial skills.

Education:

Master’s in Health Administration, 2011

Interested in working remotely, willing to travel, willing to write and speak at conferences, has valid US passport.

Resume can be found here.

Blog: richardkrasner.wordpress.com

Phone number: +1 561-603-1685 (mobile)

 

Opt-Out: The Final Word?

For the first post of the new year, I want to return to a well-worn subject, thanks to Joe Paduda, who published his predictions for workers’ comp last week: Opt-Out in workers’ comp.

In part 2 of Joe’s predictions, he predicted that Opt-Out will not gain any traction, and that Opt-Out is a solution in search of a problem. By that, Joe means that workers’ comp is working well overall, and that costs are under control, employers don’t see it as an issue, and there is no political constituency that wants to make it happen.

Joe rightly points out that the problems facing work comp are tiny compared to other issues state legislatures are dealing with — such as taxes, school funding, gerrymandering, Medicaid expansion, rural hospital funding, industrial and economic development, natural disaster preparation and recovery.

However, Joe’s friend, Jennifer Wolf Horesjh, Executive Director of the IAIABC (International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions) believes that advocates are working diligently to promote Opt-Out/Non-subscription.

In my comment to Joe, I said the following: “The Koch Brothers and the companies behind ARAWC are free-market, libertarians who don’t want government social insurance programs like work comp. You are probably correct that it won’t happen, but that won’t stop them from trying.”

Whether Joe is right or wrong in his prediction, will have to wait until the end of this year. But since it is only a prediction, time will tell if Opt-Out moves forward. Thus the title of this piece has a question mark, because we don’t know what the final word is on the subject.