Monthly Archives: September 2018

Trends in Workers’ Compensation Claims: Some Things to Think About for Medical Travel

It is rare that I post articles from the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) on this blog, and it has been some time since I discussed workers’ comp and medical travel in the same post, so I thought that this would be a good time to do so.

NCCI is the premier source for data collection in the workers’ compensation industry. Their focus is more involved with the factors that drive the cost of workers’ comp insurance, rather than specific issues in workers’ comp that one might find from reading the reports of the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI).

As the article will note, there has been a decrease in frequency of claims, but an increase in severity. Claim frequency is defined by NCCI as the number of claims involving lost wage benefits paid, divided by earned premium. For those of you in the health care and medical travel worlds, just know that it means there are more claims reported to insurance carriers.

Claim severity, on the other hand, is defined as losses incurred, divided by the number of claims, for lost wage benefits paid. This will be of importance to the medical travel industry, as they have found a +16% increase in medical severity from 2011 to 2016.

I will let you read the rest of the article here.

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Ex-UN chief Ban Ki-moon says US healthcare system is ‘morally wrong’ | US news | The Guardian

Here is an article from The Guardian newspaper that spells out what is wrong with the American health care system.

We should pay attention to what Secretary General Ban said.

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Exclusive: Former UN secretary general accuses ‘powerful’ health interests in the US of blocking universal healthcare

Source: Ex-UN chief Ban Ki-moon says US healthcare system is ‘morally wrong’ | US news | The Guardian

Medical Travel/Health Care Thought Leader Seeks Opportunities

 

Medical Travel/HealthCare Thought Leader and Blogger, seeks opportunities to speak, write, and collaborate on projects to bring about greater participation of patients to global medical travel facilities.

NOTE: I am not a physician, nor do I have patients or clients to refer to you. I am seeking persons already engaged in medical travel who want to expand into a new market. I offer my services in an administrative or managerial capacity.

Experience:

Over five and a half years experience creating, maintaining, and analyzing current issues in Medical Travel, Health Care, and other topics.

Over six years research into the Medical Travel industry.

Promoted the implementation of medical travel into Workers’ Compensation insurance industry.

Analyzed the cost of healthcare and the options of alternative treatments abroad.

Presented White Paper to Medical Travel conference in Mexico in Nov. 2014.

Extensive experience in Insurance and Claims Management, especially in medical-related claims (Workers’ Compensation).

Strong administrative and financial skills.

Education:

Master’s in Health Administration, 2011

Interested in working remotely, willing to travel, willing to write and speak at conferences, has valid US passport.

Resume can be found here.

Blog: richardkrasner.wordpress.com

Phone number: +1 561-603-1685 (mobile)

 

U.S. Near Bottom, Hong Kong and Singapore at Top of Health Havens – Bloomberg

Want medical care without quickly draining your fortune? Try Singapore or Hong Kong as your healthy havens.

Source: U.S. Near Bottom, Hong Kong and Singapore at Top of Health Havens – Bloomberg

When ICE comes knocking, healthcare workers want to be prepared | Healthcare Dive

Note: No matter where you come down on the issue of immigration and the undocumented, this process of rounding up men, women and children needing medical care is reminiscent of the tactics carried out not only by the Gestapo during the Nazi period in Germany, but every other authoritarian regime in history. We should be better than this. We are better than this.

 

Hospital staff are on the front lines in the fight against a growing threat to their patients’ health: fear.

Source: When ICE comes knocking, healthcare workers want to be prepared | Healthcare Dive

Michigan threatens to repeal Medicaid expansion if work requirements not approved | Healthcare Dive

Note: One more state is attempting to include work requirements for Medicaid recipients, as previously posted in Arkansas Medicaid Work Requirement Failing Out of the Gate.

 

Two JAMA studies bolster critics of work requirements who say most Medicaid recipients who are able to work are already doing so, and tracking compliance will heap more administrative burden onto an already-taxed system.

Source: Michigan threatens to repeal Medicaid expansion if work requirements not approved | Healthcare Dive

Mid-Week Catch-Up

Borrowing a page from another blogger, here are some items that I have seen this week that I did not immediately post to the blog. The first three are courtesy of Medical Travel.com.

From AHA.org, comes an article about the Zika epidemic I wrote about a while ago. About 14% of babies age one or older who were born in U.S. territories to pregnant women infected with Zika virus since 2016 have at least one health problem possibly caused by exposure to the virus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported today. About 6% had Zika-associated birth defects, 9% nervous system problems and 1% both.

From Health Affairs.org, comes a report about the fundamental flaw of health care and the recurring-payment-for-outcomes solution.

Bloomberg.org reported that US hospitals are shutting at a 30-a-year pace with no end in sight.

Lastly, Health Affairs blog posted an article about an issue I covered some years ago, the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).

Have a good rest of the week after remembering the fallen of 9/11. FYI, I was in Houston at the time, just having started a new job with Aon there, and heard about the first plane crashing into the north tower while driving to work and listening to the radio. As we were all new, and had little to do, I took a brief siesta and when I went into the hallway, was told to go upstairs to the break room. There was a TV on, and as I entered the room, the south tower went down. This NYC born kid was not sure what was going to happen next, surrounded as I was by all these Texans. I remembered the people and companies I knew there in both towers, especially my cousin who was there for the 1993 attack.