We’ve Got to Stop Meeting Like This

This morning I received a notice of the upcoming IMTJ Summit next month in Athens, Greece. Last month, it was the Temos conference in Dusseldorf. And just after that one, one connection of mine traveled to China as an invited guest. I’d never heard of Temos before last month.

It seems that every month, year after year, there are conferences, summits, congresses, etc. all over the world, either on a global, regional, or national level.

I noticed these conferences are advertised in some of the online newsletters and print publications from the industry. Yet, when I started this blog, three newsletters, one in Singapore, one in Malaysia, and one in the US, closed within a year or so of them picking up my earliest posts on Medical Travel.

It is impossible, of course, for anyone to attend these conferences at the same time, so it must be very small crowds that attend, or a very privileged few who do.

A member of my family likes to attend every wedding, and that is not always possible. However, being invited would be nice occasionally.

This is not the first time I have spoken about the number of conferences in the Medical Travel industry, an industry, I think you will agree, that is not very big, and despite inflated numbers to the contrary, has not had the growth many would like to see.

I specifically titled this post, We’ve Got to Stop Meeting Like This, facetiously because I have only attended three conferences and have met only a handful of individuals. The rest I have connected with online, and really do not know, nor do they know me. I’m not so bad once you meet me.

I still get notices about the Mexican conference promoted by Carlos Arceo, even though he no longer invites non-facilitators and non-experts to his show. I haven’t even seen anything about the Costa Rican conference since I attended the one in 2014.

I wonder how much better this industry would look to the outside world if more non-facilitators, more passionate individuals such as myself and others would be invited to attend and present the industry in a more favorable light to the rest of the world.

Such conferences should not be private clubs or reserved for those with flexible schedules to jet all over the world, even if they are not speaking, and only showing their face.

Perhaps you can forgo for a time scheduling so many conflicting and coterminous conferences, and concentrate on making one great industry-wide conference to better organize the industry and to set standards and good practices for all participants in the industry.

Maybe then when we do meet at some of these conferences, we can joke that we really should stop meeting like this.

What do you think?

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This entry was posted in Conferences, Medical Tourism, Medical Travel and tagged , , , , , , on by .

About Transforming Workers' Comp

Have worked in the Insurance and Risk Management industry for more than thirty years in New York, Florida and Texas in the Claims and Risk Management spheres, primarily in Workers’ Compensation Claims, Auto No-Fault and Property & Casualty Claims Administration and Claims Management. Have experience in Risk and Insurance Business Analysis, Risk Management Information Systems, and Insurance Data Processing and Data Management. Received my Master’s in Health Administration (MHA) degree from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida in December 2011. Received my Master of Arts (MA) degree in American History from New York University, and received my Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in Liberal Arts (Political Science/History/Social Sciences) from SUNY Brockport. I have studied World History, Global Politics, and have a strong interest in the future of human civilization in all aspects; economic, political and social. I am looking for new opportunities that will utilize my previous experience and MHA degree. I am available for speaking engagements and am willing to travel. LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardkrasner Resume: https://www.box.com/s/z8rxcks6ix41m3ocvvep

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