All Quiet on the Medical Tourism Front

It’s been a while since I posted anything on medical travel, so you will forgive me for taking liberties with the title of Erich Maria Remarque’s novel about the First World War.

I guess the lull can be attributed to the shock of realizing that the current occupant of the White House is totally unfit and may be reckless, so the world is holding its collective breath to see what happens.

Or, it could be that you are waiting for the other shoe to drop, and by that, I mean, what will happen to the Affordable Care Act now that he has signed an executive order to dismantle it.

This much we do know. What we don’t know is will the Republicans in Congress repeal it completely, or will they replace parts of it. And what does you-know-who want? Canadian-style health care, as some have suggested he favors? And we also know that his nominee for Health and Human Services is against the ACA, and the Speaker of the House wants to kill Medicare and Medicaid.

Your guess is as good as mine. But whatever happens, it is certain that the industry needs to be prepared, because once people lose their coverage, they will need alternatives to high cost medical care here.

A total repeal would be catastrophic for health care in this country. Replacing it with something worse will also be bad for the health care industry, but may offer a way for medical travel to finally get a hearing with the American people, at least those who can afford to go abroad after losing their ACA coverage.

Those covered under Medicaid when their states expanded coverage will be the ones to lose the most, since they are the poorest and sickest. Those who purchased coverage through the exchanges and paid lower premiums than those who paid higher premiums, may be right for medical travel, if the industry goes after them.

Predictions are that should the ACA be repealed, premiums for everyone will go up. So, it is imperative that the industry be ready, willing, and able to handle the influx of new patients, and not just for boutique procedures and expensive treatments.

I said this once before, and I will say it again, the market will not come to you; you must go to the market. You must show Americans that there is an alternative to high cost care in the US, and for obvious reasons, only those locations within a three-hour flight will be possible.

BTW, if any of you need someone to work on a project for medical travel between the US and your country, let me know. You know me by now, so don’t be a stranger.

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