Borderless Healthcare: A Model for the Future of Medical Care in Workers’ Comp

By now, many of you, my faithful, and not so faithful readers (and critics) have been aware of my strong interest and passion about implementing medical tourism into workers’ comp.

The critics have not silenced me, they have only made me more determined than ever to get the word out…MEDICAL CARE UNDER WORKERS’ COMP IN THE US WILL HAVE TO GLOBALIZE, OR ELSE IT WILL FAIL TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CARE AT LOWER COST AND AT EQUAL OR BETTER QUALITY THAN WHAT IS RECEIVED CURRENTLY.

I capitalized the above because in the three plus years I have been writing this blog, it takes a bit of shouting to get heard in this world.

To make the point I just shouted, I participated yesterday in a webinar on Bloomberg BNA.com produced by Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP/Manatt Jones Global Solutions.

For all of you political junkies out there, Charles Manatt was the Chairman of the Democratic Party from 1981 to 1985, in the first term of that has-been Hollywood actor the GOP shoved down our throats.

The webinar, “Healthcare without Borders: The Opportunities and Challenges of Medical Tourism”, was an almost ninety minute, four-part presentation given by two Managing Directors, a Partner, and a Medical Director of a Mexican hospital system.

The presenters were Jon Glaudemans, Managing Director of Manatt Health Solutions, Andrew Rudman, Managing Director of Manatt Jones Global Solutions, Linda Tiano, Partner with Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP, and Dr. Alfonso Vargas Rodriguez, Medical Director of Hospitales H+.

While the focus of the middle of the presentation dealt with conducting medical tourism in Mexico, the information presented by Mr. Glaudermans was concerned about the trends in healthcare that are pointing to greater demand for medical tourism, and are elaborated in the following graphic:

Megatrends

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

Here are the key points from Mr. Glaudemans’ presentation slides:

  • Consumers pay more and make more care decision, using social
    media/apps to acquire price/network data.
  • Providers take risk for population/patient/product outcomes, requiring new care models and contracts
  • Care monitoring and delivery move out of traditional settings, shifting the locus of/focus on patient loyalty
  • Providers and payers consolidate to manage costs and enhance power, fighting for CM (care management) space
  • States become more active regulators and purchasers, creating marketplace mosaics and more “experiments”
  • Data on health status and effectiveness become widely available, changing practice and payment patterns
  • Bigger datasets yield insights, informing personalized care and challenging price-setting and patient privacy
  • Employers’ role continues to erode, while exchange plans sharpen focus on multi-year patient loyalty
  • Digital natives’ and baby boomers’ interests coalesce, forcing focus on new ‘late-life/end-of-life’ care models
  • Visibility into global pricing and care models improves, requiring providers to justify value and pricing
  • Social determinants accepted as major cost driver, leading to increased focus on service integration

Naturally, many of these megatrends will not pertain to workers’ comp, but given the fact that comp sometimes follows the lead of healthcare, it is not out of the realm of possibility that some of these trends will be felt in medical care for workers’ comp.

Andrew Rudman’s presentation focused on what medical tourism is, and why Mexico is an ideal medical tourism destination for Americans. The main thrust of his presentation is the proximity to the US, the flight times between major American cities and those Mexican medical tourism destinations he focused on in the discussion.

Mr. Rudman also provided a cost comparison chart between US and Mexican costs of certain medical procedures, which is shown below.

Cost comparison 2012

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP/PROMEXICO

Dr. Rodriquez discussed how Mexican doctors become certified in their sub-specialties and how they get re-certified once they are certified by their respective boards. In addition, he showed slides about the various hospitals in the Hospitales H+ system, and for our purposes here, outlined the price differential for certain orthopedic surgeries at the various hospitals in their system versus that of the US.

Ortho surgery prices

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP/Hospitales H+

Lastly, Linda Tiano covered the legal issues of medical tourism, and those of you who have been reading this blog for three years, know that my original paper covered some of these issues, and I raised them in my presentation in Reynosa, Mexico in November 2014.

Here are the key points Linda made regarding medical tourism benefits.

Medical Tourism Benefits

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

3rd Party Facilitator

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

Liability issues

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

HIPAA

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

State Regs

Source:  2016+Medical+Tourism+Deck.pdf Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP

At the end, I asked the question, “do you see the possibility of implementing medical tourism into workers’ comp, and what are the legal issues with that?” Ms. Tiano mentioned the state-specific laws regarding workers’ comp, and said that the workers’ comp industry is way behind health care, to which I heartily agreed.

So you can see from this brief, but thorough review of the presentation, that medical tourism is a serious research area for many interested parties. Yet, you guys in work comp refuse to see, hear or speak about the truth of what is happening around you. So here is another picture for you.

hear-no-evil-see-no-evil-speak-no-evil

This is the workers’ comp industry on the subject of global health care and medical tourism…three deaf, dumb and blind monkeys clinging to the same old statutes, laws and regulations that haven’t changed since the days of Taft and Wilson.

So when are you going to catch up to the rest of the world, and to the globalization of health care? In the 23rd century? When are you going to admit to yourselves that automation, new technology, the Internet of Things, telemedicine, etc., are going to make you guys OBSOLETE… to borrow a term from “The Twilight Zone”.

I have a vision for the future of medical care in workers’ comp. What you have is the same old, same old, and expecting different results. That’s not only crazy, that is doing a disservice to the people workers’ comp is supposed to be for, the claimant.

But suit yourselves…the dinosaurs are waiting to greet you.

 

 

 

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