Low-Income Uninsured Declines Due to ACA Expansion: Kentucky

Richard’s Note: This is my 250th post, although not all of them were written by me, and some of them are just infograms; nevertheless, this is an important milestone. It shows that with dogged determination, in the face of heavy odds and criticism, one can persevere and be insightful at the same time. My only wish is that more people would read this blog, and that it would be taken more seriously. One does not need a title to be taken seriously. Just ask Donald Trump.

As reported today in Health Affairs, Kentucky, which was one of two Southern states to expand Medicaid in 2013, saw a sharp decline in the percentage of uninsured from 35 percent at the end of 2013 to 11 percent in late 2014.

This decline was part of a study that was completed before the new Kentucky governor, Matt Bevins, a Tea Party lackey, announced that he would discontinue the expansion.

The study used data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, an annual survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Residents of Missouri, Tennessee, and Virginia, three neighboring states not expanding Medicaid eligibility, served as study controls.

Some of the other study findings revealed declines in the number of people with unmet medical needs and lacking a regular source of health care.

But now that the new governor has discontinued the expansion, it is quite probable that rates of uninsurance will once again climb, as those who gained insurance under the ACA, will more than likely have it taken away from them.

What this means for the health care system in Kentucky, and in the other states that expanded Medicaid, should their states elect more Matt Bevins, is that people who one did not have insurance, will find themselves back in the same position before the ACA.

As I wrote back in May of last year, in my article, “Failure to Expand Medicaid Could Lead to Cost-Shift to Work Comp“, states such as Florida (my state), Texas (naturally), Virginia (legislature said no, governor wants it), Wisconsin (Scott (I hate unions) Walker, and others, are likely to see such cost-shifting.

Adding Kentucky to that mix will only make matters worse. Why the health care industry in general, and the workers’ comp industry in particular, does not explore ALL possible options to providing health care to low-income and injured workers, is beyond me.

But to leave out one particular option because some judge won’t order it (do doctors order executions?), or because some people think that medical care outside the three mile limit of the US is sub-standard, or because they like the status quo and are fooling themselves into believing that some new program or scheme will fix the problem?

And to tell your industry that those “ideas” are new trends without even trying that one particular option, cannot be called “outfront ideas”. It is just more of the same.

Readers of this blog know what that option is…it is part of the reason this blog exists, and why it will continue to exist. We must open our health care options to every conceivable possibility, no matter how far fetched or “out there” it is. It is a law of economics if you can find a product or service at lower cost, and at equal or better quality somewhere else, you will buy it. That seems to work for everything else, but health care.

 

 

 

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