Paralysis by Analysis: Or the Only Thing We Have to Fear Is, Fear Itself

Having now written this blog for more than two and a half years, I find that when I discuss the issue of medical travel, either for workers’ comp or for general health care, that there are dozens of reasons (or maybe they are excuses) given by various individuals I have conversations with, as to why medical travel is not feasible or even profitable.

Being an intelligent, well-educated person, I know that this country has put men and women into orbit, landed on the Moon, and have sent unmanned space crafts to every single planet and planetoid in our system, as well as sent two probes out of the solar system and into deep space.

And yet, as complicated as these space missions were, no one ever said it was impossible, no one ever said it would never work, no one ever said it was not profitable, and no one ever said there was no incentive in it for this one or that one, etc., ad infinitum.

However, that is not the case with medical travel. There always seems to be some kind of reason, some kind of caveat, and some kind of negative excuse given against this idea. And mostly, it concerns what some lawyer would do to an employer, or other entity that puts the fear of a lawsuit or economic ruin if this were to be attempted.

But it is not just lawyers who are at fault here for the fear that I am sensing. Laws and regulations designed to deal with all aspects of the health care and benefits fields, not to mention the statutes and regs in workers’ comp, are to blame for what a career counselor I knew years ago here in Florida, used to tell unemployed people at the weekly workshop.

He was a retired engineer, and in his field, they talked a lot about “paralysis by analysis”, and how we stop doing things once we analyze it to death. This was true in the engineering field, and is true in doing a job search, and even implementing medical travel into either health care or work comp.

We are so used to being afraid of doing new things, we are so afraid of doing something different and out of the norm, that one has to wonder why any of us get out of bed in the morning, or leave the house for that matter, fearing that something terrible is going to happen.

As pertains to medical care, of course bad things can happen. They can happen in the hospital across town, or on the way to the hospital, but we don’t avoid it because of what might happen. The same is true for medical travel. The same complications and negative outcomes can occur here that they are afraid of might happen over there.

Then there is the legal liability excuse. Damn, if I had to worry about legal liability, I would not take my car out of the garage.

And here again, we come back to the issue of lawyers and lawsuits, etc. As many of you may know, my father died last September, and since then, and earlier that year, we had to deal with lawyers to handle family matters in the event one or both of my parents passed away.

The first lawyer we used is the best friend of my first cousin, and was the person who drew up several legal documents for my parents in the past. The second lawyer was referred to me by the first lawyer after my father died, and I was using him up until April, when my brother decided to go with someone who was referred to him by a fourth lawyer he sat next to on the plane to Miami when my brother came for a short visit.

I have known many lawyers in my life, as no doubt many of you have, and on the whole, they are not a bad lot. But some of them are just out for the money and to prevent progress on a whole range of fronts, including health care and workers’ comp.

I have worked for and under two lawyers in my career in claims. Both of them did not leave me with a good feeling for insurance lawyers, so when I hear that employers are afraid to consider medical travel to save money on expensive surgeries, or that some large organization in the labor world might sue an employer or a union, because benefits are negotiated in collective bargaining agreements, then it tells me that people are afraid that it might work.

Instead, the lawyers force employers and insurers to spend more money because it is in a contract, or they want to use American medical providers, etc.; when it has been clearly proven that ours is the most expensive health care system in the world.

FDR said in his first inaugural address that the only thing we have to fear is, fear itself. It would seem that in the case of medical travel, it is not fear itself we fear. We fear lawyers and lawsuits, we fear what others might say or do, we fear that employees will like to go abroad because the care is better, we fear that employers will save money which rightfully belongs to those who are profiting from the status quo, and most importantly, we fear that we aren’t the best in everything, except in self-delusion and in paralysis by analysis.

We can do better.

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I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer interested in saving money on expensive surgeries, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies at (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com. Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp. Connect with me on LinkedIn and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com. Share this article, or leave a comment below.

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This entry was posted in Fear, Legal Barriers, Legal Issues, Medical Tourism, Medical Travel, Paralysis by Analysis, Unions, Workers' Comp, Workers' Compensation and tagged , , , , , , on by .

About Transforming Workers' Comp

Have worked in the Insurance and Risk Management industry for more than thirty years in New York, Florida and Texas in the Claims and Risk Management spheres, primarily in Workers’ Compensation Claims, Auto No-Fault and Property & Casualty Claims Administration and Claims Management. Have experience in Risk and Insurance Business Analysis, Risk Management Information Systems, and Insurance Data Processing and Data Management. Received my Master’s in Health Administration (MHA) degree from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida in December 2011. Received my Master of Arts (MA) degree in American History from New York University, and received my Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in Liberal Arts (Political Science/History/Social Sciences) from SUNY Brockport. I have studied World History, Global Politics, and have a strong interest in the future of human civilization in all aspects; economic, political and social. I am looking for new opportunities that will utilize my previous experience and MHA degree. I am available for speaking engagements and am willing to travel. LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardkrasner Resume: https://www.box.com/s/z8rxcks6ix41m3ocvvep

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