Monthly Archives: March 2015

My Response to Rebecca Shafer and Michael Stack

Rebecca Shafer, J.D. and Michael Stack, CPA are the president and principal ofAmaxx Risk Solutions, Inc., respectively.

This morning, on their blog, Rebecca wrote an article about the six things employers should do to avoid being a part of a ProPublica report.

You may be aware that ProPublica and NPR have recently reported on the harm many injured workers have received not only at the hands of medical personnel and the workers compensation industry, but even from their own employers.

I decided to write a response to Rebecca and Michael. Here is the text of my email to them:

Rebecca and Michael,

There should be a seventh item to your list. Employers should respect the health, welfare, dignity and honest hard work of their employees so that the treatment these workers have been subjected to, as stated in the reports, do not occur.

But the problem is, the American employer historically believes he is lord and master of his domain, which includes the workers and the materials he uses to make the employer wealthy.

If you don’t believe me, here is a quote from someone who knew what real industrial hell does to workers and workers’ lives:

“Capital is reckless of the health or length of life of the laborer, unless under compulsion from society.”

Karl Marx

We are seeing a recrudescence of 19th century, laissez-faire industrial capitalism, with its grinding poverty, income inequality, and now thanks to ProPublica and OSHA, a return to the days when workers lost limbs all in the name of ever greater profit for the owner, but misery and despair for the worker who is injured.

There was a case a few years ago about a company in Alabama that had serious injuries to their employees and not even OSHA could shut them down, This company was featured in a series of articles in the New York Times and on PBS, and because the business owner believed that no one had the right to tell him how to run his business, he could do whatever he pleased.

This is libertarianism, or also known as classical liberalism, and was the modus operandi of American business throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries, until reforms such as workers’ comp, unemployment insurance, the eight-hour day and other legislation consigned these problems to the dustheap of history. But one political party, with the backing of big business and billionaires, are taking us back to the bad old days.

Until the American worker is treated with dignity and respect by their employers, there will continue to be more reports from not only ProPublica, but from Mother Jones, PBS, the New York Times, and many other journalistic outlets.

The culture of greed at any cost, the culture of adversarial labor/management relations, and the push for ever greater return on investment for those who sit on their behinds and reap the benefits of the sacrifices made by workers, whether it is an arm, leg, foot, hand, or fingers must end. That will only happen when workers are treated like human beings and not like the machinery that takes their limbs or their lives.

Addressing the problems reported by ProPublica will not be solved merely by telling the employer to do a better job of managing their claims, their TPA’s and carriers, and getting better communication with their employees, but rather the discarding of the mean-spirited, and vindictive attitudes many employers manifest against any employee who gets hurt or files a claim, files a grievance, or any other proactive stance that is seen as a threat to an employer and his precious bottom line.

Without workers, nothing gets done. Without workers, there is no business, no profit, no return on investment. We are still far from a completely automated industrial production system whereby no human will ever be hurt or maimed again, so rather than go back to the bad old days of the Industrial Revolution, as many Libertarians and Republicans, and the Koch Brothers would wish, why not be more respectful and open and honest with your employees and treat them as you would want to be treated if you were them…with dignity.

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I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer who is sick and tired of being bled by the Wall Street vulture capitalists and the entire medico-legal system known as workers’ comp, to save money, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees, while at the same time, helping to break the monopoly of the American health care cartel.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com. Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp. Connect with me on LinkedIn and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com. Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Workers’ Comp Besieged: Independent Views of the Problems Workers’ Comp is Facing

I had intended to write an article about the recent reports from NPR/ProPublica and OSHA about the serious harm many workers are being subjected to by the workers’ comp system, as well as write about a recent article in Mother Jones magazine attacking the opt-out issue that I have written about in the past.

However, David De Paolo has written a good article that I want to share with you today, as well as my comment to him in response.

Here is David’s article:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/year-awareness-david-depaolo?trk=hb_ntf_MEGAPHONE_ARTICLE_POST

Here is my comment to him this morning:

David,

I wrote to Michael Grabell last week and gave him my research on the employee/employer choice of physician issue, which I think he got wrong. He said that there were 37 states that limited choice, but he did not read the text to the WCRI report from last April that listed all of the option employees had. As is usual with politically oriented journalists, they assume that if there is a complex set of rules, then that is a restriction on the rights of people. It isn’t. It is just that allowing an injured worker to choose any doctor, especially his private doctor, does not work when you are dealing with occupational injuries, as many of them are not trained to treat them, so the state legislatures established guidelines for the choice of physicians that employees can have. Also, I read the MJ article, and wrote the author, but have not had any response. I was a subscriber to MJ years ago, and understand their point of view, but I agree with your assessment to a point. Yet, there is some validity to MJ’s suspicions, in light of the way businesses and politicians are rolling back the gains of the labor movement and taking the country back to the late 19th century when workers had no rights, no benefits, and were at the mercy of the so-called “free market” that government, and in particular, work comp was supposed to deal with. I support the opt-out option only as far as it will allow workers to get better care in medical facilities that are less expensive and have equal or better quality of care. I do not support ARAWC if their real motive is to gut workers’ comp and get rid of it altogether.

I was a little conflicted when I read the Mother Jones article, especially since I have been so supportive of opt-out with regard to implementing medical travel into workers’ comp, but I want to make this perfectly clear, echoing a now disgraced ex-president, that: I, in no way support the dismantling and elimination of workers’ compensation altogether, just so that the extreme right-wing, free-market libertarian types, win and workers lose, as we are seeing in many states across the nation.

David is right when he says that opt-out must have reasonable protections that meet the essential elements of work injury protection and that means taking care of an injury for life and not stacking dispute resolution in favor of one party or the other.

And he is also right that we need to become more aware of the problems of workers’ comp, and not wish that “everything is beautiful” and therefore any discussion of the ills of workers’ comp, even ones that rely on anecdotes and personal stories, rather than statistics and data, are not to be accepted or given credence.

Disraeli said this about lies: “There are three types of lies — lies, damn lies, and statistics.”

Paul Broduer said: “Statistics are human beings with the tears wiped off.”

So statistics can only tell us so much. It’s the lives of real people brought forth in articles like the one in Mother Jones, or the reports by NPR/ProPublica and OSHA that really have any real value, because there are real human beings in there, not a bunch of numbers.

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I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer who is sick and tired of being bled by the Wall Street vulture capitalists and the entire medico-legal system known as workers’ comp, to save money, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees, while at the same time, helping to break the monopoly of the American health care cartel.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies, (561) 738-0458 or (561) 603-1685, cell. Email me at: richard_krasner@hotmail.com. Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp. Connect with me on LinkedIn and follow my blog at: richardkrasner.wordpress.com. Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Accountable Care Organizations May Shift Claims into Workers’ Comp

As reported Monday on the Insurance Information Institute’s blog, Terms + Conditions, and posted by Claire Wilkinson, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) may actually cause millions of claims dollars to be shifted into the workers’ comp system, according to research by the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI).

Under the ACA, a mechanism called an Accountable Care Organization (ACO), which was designed to control costs, was used by the researchers at WCRI to estimate the nature of the cost shift, as well as giving a general idea of the magnitude of the shift. They used the ACO’s similarity to Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) in their research.

The ACA calls for the creation of ACO’s, which is a network of doctors and hospitals that share the financial and medical responsibility for a group of patients. The ACO receives a set amount per patient for a year, regardless of the services. This is called a capitated plan.

What the WCRI found by looking at a nationwide sample of more than 700,000 claims from 2008 to 2010, was that about 17 percent came from HMO’s. In those states with a large HMO presence, HMO doctors declared 26 percent of soft tissue injuries into workers’ comp. This was 30 percent higher than doctors in fee for service arrangements.

The Executive Director of WCRI, Dr. Richard Victor, estimated that ACO’s could increase the percentage of workers in capitated plans by 25 percent. Such an increase was determined would allow capitation plans to regain 15 percent of the market it has lost since 2000.

As stated in the blog article, cost-shifting in Illinois would out $90 million of claims into workers’ comp. and in Pennsylvania, it would cost insurers $55 million.

As I’ve said in my post, Workers’ Comp at a Crossroads: Where Does it Go from Here?, and in many other articles, things are not looking up for workers’ comp in the near term and well into the future.

But still, with the handwriting on the wall, and the trumpets blaring that will bring down the walls of the padded cell that is the American workers’ comp system, this industry insists on playing the “see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil” game.

A conversation I had earlier today with a broker about medical travel and workers’ comp convinced me that at some point there needs to be a safety valve in this system, otherwise it will collapse in on itself.

Shortages of doctors, nurses, rising inpatient and outpatient costs, consolidation of hospitals, and other pressures will mount even greater, and not even the move towards domestic medical travel within the US will be sufficient to alleviate the bottleneck that is coming down the road.

But go ahead and keep running around on that wheel you see in squirrel cages, because in the final analysis, you are all just rats in a maze, with no clue.

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I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer who is sick and tired of being bled by the Wall Street vulture capitalists and the entire medico-legal system known as workers’ comp, to save money, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees, while at the same time, helping to break the monopoly of the American health care cartel.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies. Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp. Connect with and follow me on LinkedIn and my blog. Share this article, or leave a comment below.

Top 10 Causes of Workplace Injuries: How Medical Tourism Can Save Employers Money

Merrell: “…Can you see a role of medical tourism in workers’ compensation injury?”
Ludwick: “I could, if it were a long-term issue. Many workers’ comp issues are emergent,
so that would take out the medical tourism aspect. However, if it was a long-range issue, I
could see us involving workmen’s comp issues into that, or problems.”
Lazzaro: “I would support that. I don’t know the incidence, for example, of some of the
orthopedic procedures that are non-emergent, such as knee or hip replacement, which would
fall under workmen’s comp. But theoretically, a case could be made for that…”
Merrell: “I was thinking about it in terms of the chronic back injury and the repetitive action
injuries and hernia that are in the workers’ compensation area. An acute injury on the job
would probably not be at issue but a work-associated problem with a potentially surgical
solution might be a matter for medical tourism.”

You may recognize the above quoted dialogue from my white paper on medical tourism and workers’ comp. I am reprinting it here because I came across a report from the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety that highlighted the top ten causes and direct costs of the most disabling workplace injuries in 2012. My thanks goes to Jim Mecham, Continuing Education Director and Return-to-Work Software Developer at OCCUPRO, for bringing this to my attention through his post on LinkedIn.

The report, the 2014 Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index is based on information from Liberty Mutual, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), and the National Academy of Social Insurance. The Index provides statistics for injuries that occurred in 2012, which is the most recent year for which data was available.

The Index showed that the most disabling injuries and illnesses had a direct workers’ comp cost of $59.58 billion, which translates to over a billion dollars a week spent by business on the most disabling injuries.

The following chart indicates what those ten injuries are, the percentage of each type of injury, and the direct cost.

safe_image

Source: Bing Images

The top five causes were:

  • Overexertion involving outside source
  • Falls on same level
  • Struck by object or equipment
  • Falls to lower level
  • Other exertions or bodily reactions

Overexertion accounted for 25.3% of injuries, and is further identified as being caused by lifting, pushing, pulling, holding, carrying, or throwing, and cost businesses $15.1 billion in direct costs.

Falls to same level accounted for 15.4% of injuries, costing $9.19 billion.

Struck by object or equipment injuries accounted for 8.9% of injuries and cost $5.3 billion.

Falls to lower level accounted for 8.6% and cost $5.12 billion.

Other exertions and bodily reactions accounted for 7.2% of injuries and cost $4.27 billion. This includes injuries resulting from bending, crawling, reaching, twisting, climbing, stepping, kneeling, sitting, standing, or walking.

The second group of five injury causes accounted for 18.4% of the direct total cost of injuries. These were:

  • Roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicles — 5.3%, $3.18 billion;
  • Slip or trip without fall — 3.6%, $2.17 billion;
  • Caught in/compressed by equipment — 5%, $2.1 billion;
  • Repetitive motions involving micro-tasks — 3.1%, $1.84 billion;
  • Struck against object or equipment — 2.9%, $1.76 billion

These ten injuries comprised 83.8% of the total cost burden for disabling work-related injuries in 2012.

What does this all mean?

For the employer, it means a lot, especially in terms of dollars and cents that can be avoided if there are proper safety programs in place to lessen the frequency and severity of these injuries. However, accidents do occur, and while safety programs do work, they don’t always live up to the promise; nor do workers ever follow safety rules, so when these injuries occur, it would be wise for an employer to find a less expensive way to deal with the injury than expensive surgeries at home.

For the workers’ comp industry, it means that you are not doing a very good job of saving your client’s money, or you are doing a great job making money for yourselves and other workers’ comp service providers.

And finally, for the medical tourism industry, it means you have some work to do to go out and get this business and prove to the American employers, insurance companies and injured workers that when any of these types of injuries occur, you can provide them with the best care and the lowest cost. As I said in my presentation in Reynosa, Mexico last November, “[the] Medical Tourism industry must take [the] lead and go after the market; the market will not come to you”.

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I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer willing to save money, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies. Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp. Connect with and follow me on LinkedIn and my blog. Share this article, or leave a comment below.

US States Ranked by Well-Being: A Strategy for Implementing Medical Tourism into Workers’ Comp

My good friend, and maybe yours too, Maria Todd, sent me an article this afternoon from wcinsights.com.

The article, “State of the State’s Well-Beings”, by Kelia Scott, discussed a recently released survey from Gallop-Healthways called the 2014 State Well-Being Rankings. These rankings determine how each state is ranked in terms of well-being.

Gallop-Healthways conducted over 176,000 interviews with adults in all fifty states, and asked them to rank elements that are related to well-being like social (having support and relationships), physical (good health and daily energy), environmental (liking your community and feeling safe), financial (managing your finances to reduce stress and insecurity) and purpose (liking what you do and feeling motivated).

The findings, which can be seen in greater detail here and here as well, indicated that high rates of well-being correspond to rates of healthcare utilization, workplace performance and absenteeism, a change in obesity rates and others. In short, healthier workers may be happier workers.

The map below indicates which states are in the top quintile, the 2nd quintile, the 3rd quintile, the 4th quintile and the bottom quintile.

states-well-being-index

Source: wcinsights.com

So the strategy I would recommend for anyone wishing to implement medical tourism into workers’ comp would be to consider directing your energies and resources to the following states: Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Missouri. This would be followed by those states in the 4th and 3rd quintiles.

A personal note: I know that all of you in the medical tourism industry are sending good wishes for a speedy recovery to Maria as she recuperates from her recent illness, as I am, and that she will be back to good health as soon as possible.

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I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer willing to save money, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies. Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp. Connect with and follow me on LinkedIn and my blog. Share this article, or leave a comment below.

 

Workers’ Comp at a Crossroads: Where Does it Go from Here?

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— 
I took the one less traveled by, 
And that has made all the difference.

Robert Frost

Robert Frost’s poem, “The Road Less Traveled” is symbolic of where the workers’ comp industry stands today as it enters its second hundred years, as I intend to point out in this article, and especially in light of recent reports that indicate that the system is failing, and failing miserably to adapt to changes in the workforce, in technology, and to deal with an ever globalizing world.

You might say that workers’ comp is a Mac in an ever increasing Wintel world. In other words, workers’ comp has a closed architecture, whereas general health care has an open architecture, and like all modern electronic devices with an open architecture, it can change its parts and add new features with not that much difficulty.

But workers’ comp cannot, or will not open itself to other parts, and that is why it is failing.

To begin with, I wrote an article last week entitled, “Hospital Outpatient Costs Still Rising Says New Study”, in which I mentioned a study by the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute (WCRI). This report was one of the topics discussed this morning at their annual conference in Boston. The WCRI report stated that hospital outpatient costs are still rising, and that:

  • States with percent-of-charge-based fee regulations or no fee schedules had the highest payments to hospitals for outpatient surgical episodes for knee and shoulder surgeries. In particular, states with no hospital outpatient fee schedules had 60 to 141 percent higher hospital outpatient payments per episode compared with the typical state with fixed-amount fee schedules.
  • There was tremendous variation in the rates of change in hospital payments per surgical episode across states. From 2006 to 2013, South Carolina saw a reduction of 31 percent in this metric while in Alabama the average hospital payment per surgical episode grew by 81 percent. States with percent-of-charge-based fee regulations or no fee schedules had more rapid growth in hospital outpatient payments per episode than states with other regulatory approaches. In particular, most percent-of-charge-based fee regulation states that did not have updates to the reimbursable percentage of charges experienced growth in hospital payments per surgical episode that was 157–286 percent faster than the median of states with fixed-amount fee schedules.
  • States with cost-to-charge ratio fee regulations had similar levels and growth rates in hospital outpatient payments per episode to states with fixed-amount fee schedules. Hospital outpatient payments per episode in states with cost-to-charge ratio regulations grew 10–25 percent from 2006 to 2013.

The second half of that article discussed a report written by Peter Roumaniere, “Seismic Shifts: An Essential Guide for Practitioners and CEO’s in Workers’ Comp“. Peter’s report examined how technology and demographics will impact workers’ comp from the present day through 2022. One of the factors Peter identified was the shift from a manufacturing to service economy. By the 1960’s, the service sector began to eclipse manufacturing, and employment in services climbed from 55% to 85% of total employment.

He illustrated how jobs as a share of the national employment in three occupation groups from 1950 to 2005 declined. These occupations are: hand craft production; transport, construction, mining and farming; and machine operators and assemblers. He also said that manufacturing employment was much safer, and as an example, stated that in 1994, for every ten work injuries in manufacturing requiring one day’s lost time, there were eight such injuries in the service sector. In 2012, for every two manufacturing lost-time injuries, there were ten service sector injuries

Peter provides four most likely reason for the decline in injuries and claims in workers’ comp:

  1. Workers may be reporting and claiming less out of intimidation or unhappiness with the benefit package which has shrunk in past decades.
  2. Employment sector shifts
  3. Employers are devoting more attention to work safety
  4. Employers are pushing down lost-time claims by stay-at-work arrangements, or expediting return-to work.

The report goes on to discuss how the workers’ comp industry is shrinking and the opportunities for growth that practitioners need to be aware of, but that are out of the scope of this discussion.

Next, a post earlier this week by David De Paolo prompted me to write another article, this one entitled, “STOP THE MADNESS”, in which I decried the disgusting way that employers, their insurance companies and third party administrators are treating injured workers, in this case, a man named Glenn Johnson, who along with his wife, was arrested for allegedly filing a fraudulent workers’ comp claim, but the charges were dropped and the case never went to trial.

Mr. Johnson is not the only aggrieved injured worker in this country. There are many thousands of men and women who are treated inhumanely and unfairly by employers, insurers, and the rest of the workers’ comp system.

As a follow-up to his first post, David wrote a second post the next day in which he suggested, and rightly so, that if employers could be allowed to opt-out of the workers’ comp system, so should employees such as Glenn Johnson and his wife, so they can get the satisfaction of justice they deserve. I heartily agree, and said so in my post, ”Let Our (Working) People Go”.

Then came another report, this time by the Association of American Medical Colleges, in an article by Healthcare Finance News.com, that said that by 2025, there would be a shortage of doctors around 90,000, of which 12,500 to 31,000 would be primary care physicians, and between 28,000 to 63,700 would be non-primary care physicians.

But the really devastating reports, at least as far as workers’ comp is concerned, that came out this week and on the same day, was one report by ProPublica called “The Demolition of Workers’ Compensation” and another by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) called “Adding Inequality to Injury: THE COSTS OF FAILING TO PROTECT WORKERS ON THE JOB”.

Both David and Joe Paduda commented about these reports in their respective blogs today. David’s article is called “Cost of Being Society” and in it he said that both reports came to the same conclusion: workers’ comp… fails in its basic state mission too often, and consequently is pushing the cost of taking care of injured workers onto government benefit systems, ergo costing the general tax paying public to take up the slack.

He cites the OSHA report as saying: “Changes in state based workers’ compensation insurance programs have made it increasingly difficult for injured workers to receive full benefits (including adequate wage replacement payments and coverage for medical expenses) to which they are entitled. Employers now provide only a small percentage (about 20%) of the overall financial cost of workplace injuries and illnesses through workers’ compensation. This cost-shift has forced injured workers, their families and taxpayers to subsidize the vast majority of lost income and medical care costs generated by these conditions.”

It is David’s opinion that these reports are evidence that not only have the times changed, but that more change is necessary, and on a grander scale. Joe’s article is called “ProPublica’s demolition of workers’ comp”, and offers a critique of the report.

David De Paolo’s posts this week, and the two reports about the demolition of workers’ comp and the cost of failing to protect workers, are not mere coincidences of publication. They are a warning sign that something terrible is happening in this country.

As I mentioned in a comment in response to the ProPublica report, we are witnessing the recrudescence of 19th century capitalism, where if a worker got hurt, he lost his job, had to rely on charity from friends, neighbors, family, the church, while the owner of the business went right on making a profit. Too many Americans have been duped by slick politicians and ideologues to believe that workers have no rights, so why should they get benefits when they get hurt through no fault of their own.

So that brings us back to Robert Frost and the poem, “The Road Less Traveled”.

For that is exactly where workers’ comp, and coincidently, my writing about workers’ comp and medical tourism are, on a road less traveled. In the case of workers’ comp, it is at a crossroads as to which road to take, and I have already decided, as Frost points out, to travel the road less traveled, because I wanted to blaze a trail where no one else had been.

Workers’ comp, on the other hand, wants to go down the same old road it have been going down now for nearly a century, and expecting that the woods would be different. So while much of the industry is bundled up in snowy, cold Boston, trudging down that same old road, I am choosing another path, and that has made all the difference, because my mind is open to new possibilities, while theirs is closed, xenophobic, and rife with American Exceptionalism.

I am sure they are learning a lot about the state of workers comp while they are talking among themselves and fiddling while Rome burns, but if they were smart, they would admit that the road more traveled on is fraught with serious problems that only gets more and more serious each and every day.

All is not lost, however. There is still time for them to see a better way, to choose the road less traveled on, and one way to do that is to open the system’s architecture and let in new ideas and new possibilities, especially with medical travel.

In the nearly two and a half years that I have been writing this blog, and in the four years since I first wrote my paper on implementing medical tourism into workers’ comp, I have met dozens of men and women, highly educated and highly intelligent from all over the world, Europe, Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Central America, South America and other parts of North America, and none of those outside of Europe or the Americas are witch doctors with bones in their noses. These people are ready, willing and able to provide high quality health care to anyone who needs it, and at a reasonable cost. They want our business, and are not concerned about whether it comes from general health care or workers’ comp.

And yet, the very idea of globalizing workers’ compensation is dismissed, is ridiculed, and shunted to the sideline. Well, I am not about to be shunted to the sideline or dismissed, or told to stop writing, as one Okie said earlier this week. I am going to keep on writing and advocating for change, not because I want to, but because I have to. The stakes for all workers, injured or not, is too great. Globalization is a two-way street. Jobs can go abroad, and so should the workers, injured or not.

It’s up to you…take the road less traveled on, or take the road that isn’t less traveled. And that makes all the difference.

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I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer who is looking to save money, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies. Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp. Connect with and follow me on LinkedIn and my blog. Share this article, or leave a comment below.

New Report on Doctor Shortage: What it could mean for Workers’ Comp and Medical Tourism

Healthcare Finance News.com published an article on Tuesday about a report that said the doctor shortage could be 90,000 by 2025.

Here is the link to the article:

http://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/doctor-shortage-hit-90000-2025-report-says?mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRoiv63OZKXonjHpfsX56OwvWqC3lMI%2F0ER3fOvrPUfGjI4FS8pmI%2BSLDwEYGJlv6SgFQ7LHMbpszbgPUhM%3D

I’ve written before about the physician shortage (see http://wp.me/p2QJfz-hu and http://wp.me/p2QJfz-1GI)

If this report is correct, and I have no reason to doubt it, then the American health care system, workers’ comp included, is headed for disaster. But the band plays on while the Titanic is sinking.

I am willing to work with any broker, carrier, or employer who is sick and tired of being bled by the Wall Street vulture capitalists and the entire medico-legal system known as workers’ comp, to save money, and to provide the best care for their injured workers or their client’s employees, while at the same time, helping to break the monopoly of the American health care cartel.

Call me for more information, next steps, or connection strategies. Ask me any questions you may have on how to save money on expensive surgeries under workers’ comp. Connect with and follow me on LinkedIn and my blog. Share this article, or leave a comment below.