Understanding Medical Tourism’s Role in Early Intervention in Workers’ Compensation

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Early intervention strategies in workers’ compensation cases are key to improving workers’ compensation results, as my LinkedIn connection, Paul Binsfield writes today in his article, Early Intervention Strategies in Workers’ Compensation in PropertyCasualty360.com. Paul is CEO of Company Nurse, a firm specializing in injury management for workers’ compensation.

In his article, he writes that In a tough economy, employers require effective and innovative ways to improve workers’ compensation results. Many program managers are updating their approach and leveraging early intervention such as prompt reporting, nurse triage, proactive claims management, and integrated return-to-work (RTW) coordination to improve performance. These strategies are designed to manage work-related injuries right from the start and bring about best possible outcomes.

He lays out five key areas employers need to focus on to insure better outcomes for their injured workers. These areas do not necessarily relate to how those wishing to implement medical tourism into workers’ compensation would be involved, but it gives one the background of what the employer has already done before the medical tourism option is considered.

The five key areas are:

  • Improving the Reporting Process
  • Quality Medical Care
  • Pre-Injury Foundation for Success
  • Post-Injury Program Improvements
  • Injury Triage as Backbone to Future Success

If medical tourism is to be successful in being implemented into workers’ compensation, a knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the process laid out by Paul and others in the workers’ compensation arena, is essential for those wishing to seek out employers and insurance carriers as partners in this venture. In much the same way that salespersons know, understand and appreciate the manufacturing process of the products they sell, so too should medical tourism facilitators and the personnel at medical tourism destinations.

By doing so, the entire process from first report of injury to initial treatment and final medical tourism care, if that occurs, would be a seamless flow from beginning to end with all interested parties working together to get the patient the best care possible and back to work as soon as medically possible. In this way, medical tourism could be seen as the end stage of the entire workers’ compensation process and the cost savings realized could be used to incentivize the employee to chose the medical tourism option, and in turn, be re-directed back to making improvements in the five key areas above.

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This entry was posted in Claims Process, Health Care, Injury Management, Intervention, Medical Tourism, Nursing, Triage, Workers' Compensation and tagged , , , , , , , , on by .

About Transforming Workers' Comp

Have worked in the Insurance and Risk Management industry for more than thirty years in New York, Florida and Texas in the Claims and Risk Management spheres, primarily in Workers’ Compensation Claims, Auto No-Fault and Property & Casualty Claims Administration and Claims Management. Have experience in Risk and Insurance Business Analysis, Risk Management Information Systems, and Insurance Data Processing and Data Management. Received my Master’s in Health Administration (MHA) degree from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida in December 2011. Received my Master of Arts (MA) degree in American History from New York University, and received my Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in Liberal Arts (Political Science/History/Social Sciences) from SUNY Brockport. I have studied World History, Global Politics, and have a strong interest in the future of human civilization in all aspects; economic, political and social. I am looking for new opportunities that will utilize my previous experience and MHA degree. I am available for speaking engagements and am willing to travel. LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/richardkrasner Resume: https://www.box.com/s/z8rxcks6ix41m3ocvvep

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